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Full text of "The Labour gazette January-June 1953"

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Canada. • labour, Uep 
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THE 

Labour Gazette 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY 

DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR, CANADA 

v. S3* 

INDEX 

VOLUME LIII 

FOR THE YEAR 
1953 



Minister — Hon. Milton F. Gregg 
Deputy Minister — Arthur H. Brown Editor — Harry J. Walker 



EDMOND CLOUTIER, C.M.G., O.A., D.S.P. 

QUEEN'S PRINTER AND CONTROLLER OF STATIONERY 

OTTAWA, 1954. 



to 

Sloi 

v. 5 "5 



ERRATA 



On Page 1270 — Column 1— para. 4 — 4th line — for 48 hours read 48 weeks. 
Table F-la — June, 1951 — under Col. Food — for 151.8 read 115.8 (for months of January, 
February, March and April, 1953). 



Page numbers of monthly editions 
Pages Month 

1- 170 January 

171- 344 February 

345- 498 March 

499- 640 April 

641- 792 May 

793- 966 June 

967-1097 July 

1099-1239 August 

1241-1400 September 

1405-1578 October 

1579-1714 November 

1715-1877 December 



604152 



INDEX 



Abbott, Hon. Douglas C, Minister of Fi- 
nance : 
says definition of "dumping" in Customs 
Act may require revision, 1603. 

Absenteeism : 

Canada — 
absenteeism amongst older workers lower, 

188. 
re accident frequency of the older worker, 
208. 
Czechoslovakia — 
enactment of new forced labour laws, 1136. 

Accident Insurance : 

Canada — • 

accident insurance plans for office workers 
in manufacturing (1949-53), 1667. 

group sickness and accident insurance plans 
in manufacturing industry (in 1949, 
1950, 1951 and 1953), 1531, 1532. 

Accidents : 

industrial health and safety session at con- 
vention of International Association 
of Governmental Labour Officials, 
1045. 
Canada — 

fatalities during first quarter of 1953, 1301, 
1404; during second quarter, 1609. 

industrial fatalities during 1952, 863, 960; 
, during 3rd quarter of 1952, 49, 170; 
4th quarter, 674, 791. 

accident prevention facilities in manu- 
facturing establishments, 569. 

The Sloan Report — results of inquiry into 
administration of Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act in British Columbia, 
552-69; 676-86. 

conference on uniformity of job accident 
statistics, 516. 

re accident frequency of the older worker, 
208. 

compensable accidents among federal em- 
ployees — Minister of Labour urges 
government workers to avoid acci- 
dents, 571. 

claims for compensation under Govern- 
ment Employees Compensation Act 
(1952-53), 1130. 

employees' compensation claims in 1951- 
52 — report of Employees Compensa- 
tion Branch, Department of Labour, 
370. 

94375— 1J 



Accidents — Con. 
Canada — Con. 

workmen's compensation paid to Canadian 

workers in 1952, 1427. 
conference proceedings of I.A.P.A. of 

Ontario, 663. 
equal labour representation on accident 
prevention boards requested by C.C. 
of L., 1456. 

B.C.: The Sloan Report — results of inquiry 
into administration of Workmen's 
Compensation Act, 552-69; 676-86; 
full benefits of piovincial Workmen's 
Compensation Act extended to civil 
defence workers, 1115; decline in fatal 
accidents in metal mining industry, 
1737. 

Man.: 1953 amendments to Workmen's 
Compensation Act, 1033. 

N.B.: 1953 amendments to Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act, 1033. 

Nfld.: amendments to Workmen's Compen- 
sation Act, 1033, 1803. 

N.S.: amendments to Workmen's Compen- 
sation Act, 1033, 1804. 

Ont.: amendments to Workmens' Compen- 
sation Act, 1033; amendment to Act 
re aerial-testing or flying by aeroplane 
manufacturer, 1186; accidents reported 
in 1950-1951, 435, 521; conference pro- 
ceedings of I.A.P.A., 663; increase in 
claims for workmen's compensation in 
1952 noted in annual report of I.A.P.A., 
985. 

P.E.I. : 1953 amendments to Workmen's 
Compensation Act, 1033. 

Que.: number of claims for workmen's com- 
pensation filed in 1951 and 1952, 370, 
985; holding that employer was not 
negligent, Superior Court dismisses 
action of injured worker for damages, 
110; survey of working conditions of 
young workers made by Jeunesse 
Ouvriere Catholique, 230, 294. 

Sask.: 1953 amendments to Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act, 1033; application of 
Workmen's Compensation (Accident 
Fund) Act to members of Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Engineers), 117; amendments to 
Workmen's Compensation (Accident 
Fund) Act, 361, 1647. 



IV 



INDEX 



Accidents — Con. 

N.W.T.: revised regulations under Mining 
Safety Ordinance, 890; revised regu- 
lations under Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Ordinance, 887. 
United Kingdom — 

accidents do not increase with age — 
report of National Advisory Commit- 
tee on the Employment of Older 
Men and Women, 188. 

mid-century report of Chief Factory In- 
spector compares working conditions 
in factories in 1951 with those of 
1901, 1304. 

job fatalities in 1952, 1293. 

fatal accidents to seamen in 1952, 1293. 
U.S.A.— 

work injuries in industry in 1952, 986, 
1293, 1763. 

Bee also Legal Decisions; Workmen's 
Compensation. 

Adult Education: 

United Kingdom — 

50th anniversary of Workers' Educational 
Association, 1470. 

Advocates: 

B.C.— 

appointment of advocates requested by 
B.C. District Council of I.W.A. in 
submission to Chief Justice Sloan, 
685. 

Age for Employment: 

See Minimum Age for Employment. 

Age Groups: 

U.S.A.— 

one in every twelve persons aged over 65 — 
Bureau of the Census, 30. 

Age Limit: 

Canada — 

extracts from Hansard re employment age 
limit, 32. 

U.S.A.— 

re age limit for office workers in manu- 
facturing industries, 39. 

Agreements : 

United Kingdom and Australia approve 
reciprocal agreement on social service 
benefits, 523. 

U.S.W.A. consider 1954 contract demands 
at policy conference, 1598. 



Agreements — Con. 
Canada — 

monthly summary of collective agreements 
and wage schedules— 91, 275, 425, 576, 
722, 879, 1025. 1160, 1322, 1498, 1631, 
1792. 

monthly summary of agreements under 
Collective Agreement Act (Quebec) — 
96, 281, 431, 580, 727, 884, 1030, 1165, 
1326, 1502, 1635, 1797. 

summary of collective agreements under 
Industrial Standard Acts — Nova Scotia, 
99, 433; New Brunswick, 99, 434, 1168; 
Ontario, 99, 434,. 730. 1168. 1506; 
Saskatchewan, 100, 1507; Alberta, 100, 
731, 1169, 1507. 

provisions of settlement reached between 
major railways and 17 non-operating 
railway unions, 19. 

terms of settlement reached between 
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen 
and Canada's railways, 187. 

strike of merchant • seamen ends — provi- 
sions of agreement reached between 
SI.U. and Shipping Federation of 
Canada (A.F. of L. — T. and L.C.), 
1427, 1597. 

collective agreements in Canadian manu- 
facturing industries — provisions of 
labour-management agreements in 
effect in 1952, 221. 

guaranteed wage and employment plans 
in collective agreements, 1269 — in 
manufacturing industry, 1269, 1270; 
in non-manufacturing industries, 1269, 
1271. 

number of white-collar workers in manu- 
facturing industries covered by col- 
lective agreements, 33. 

seniority provisions in collective agree- 
ments in manufacturing, 390. 

number of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1951, by industry, affilia- 
tion and province, 1294. 

agreements for co-ordination of rehabili- 
tation services for disabled persons 
signed by federal government and 
governments of Saskatchewan, New 
Brunswick and Manitoba, 1596. 

re collective agreements and older workers, 
210. 

wage changes during 1952, in collective 
agreements, 218, 548. 

provisions of collective agreement between 
Dupuis Freres, Montreal department 
store, and National Syndicate of 
Trade Employees (C.C.C.L.), 1140. 

U.M.W. to vote third time on no-increase 
contract — other recommendations of 
union's policy committee, 1602. 



INDEX 



Agreements — Con . 

Canada — Con. 

vocational training agreements — report of 
semi-annual conference of Vocational 
Training Advisory Council, 398. 

renewal of Vocational Training Agree- 
ment, 1752. 

revision of Vocational Schools' Assistance 
Agreement, 399, 1749. 

re Federal-Provincial Farm Labour Agree- 
ments, 48. 

recommendation of C.C.C.L. re union 
security, 1469. 

T. and L.C. support of cumulative sick 
leave plans in collective agreements, 
1291. 

Alta.: new sections under Fire Departments 
Platoon Act provide for collective 
bargaining and compulsory arbitration 
of disputes, 1799; provisions of Police 
Act, 1800. 

B.C.: provisions of first long-term contract 
in logging industry signed between 
I.W.A. and Western Plywoods (Cari- 
boo) Limited. 814; Supreme Court 
finds that collective agreement entitled 
machinists' union to perform certain 
drilling, 1516; 5-day, 40-hour week and 
wage increase provided in agreement 
between Vancouver General Hospital 
and Local 180, Hospital Employees 
Federal Union (T. and L.C), 54. 

Man.: agreement for co-ordination of re- 
habilitation services for disabled per- 
sons signed by federal government and 
government of Manitoba, 1596; 
blanket collective agreement covering 
11 local unions signed between Winni- 
peg Building Trades Council and Win- 
nipeg Builders' Exchange, 811. 

N.B.: agreement for co-ordination of rehabi- 
litation services for disabled persons 
signed by federal government and 
government of New Brunswick, 1596; 
first collective agreement between 
government department and I.B.E.W., 
signed, 371. 

Ont.: High Court of Justice finds Arbitra- 
tion Act applicable to clause in agree- 
ment between engineers and City of 
Hamilton, 441. 

Que.: provisions of collective agreement 
between Dupuis Freres, Montreal de- 
partment store, and National Syndi- 
cate of Trade Employees (C.C.C.L.), 
1140; Arbitration Board finds pro- 
posed agreement between clothing 
factory and union "one that the em- 
ployer can properly sign" and criticizes 
firm for move to bar union, 518; 



Agreements — Con. 
Que. — Con. 

agreement reached between Montreal 
civic administration and employers 
(white-collar, policemen and firemen), 
1597; number of collective agreements 
received by Labour Relations Board 
as at March 31, 1952, 310; recommen- 
dation of C.C.C.L. re union security, 
1469. 
Sask.: agreement for co-ordination of re- 
habilitation services for disabled per- 
sons signed by federal government 
and government of Saskatchewan, 
1596; amended provisions of Trade 
Union Act, 1648; industrial standard 
schedules in beauty culture, electrical 
industry, carpentry and baking indus- 
try, amended, 691. 
Australia — 

United Kingdom and Australia approve 
reciprocal agreement on social service 
benefits, 523. 
United Kingdom — 

United Kingdom and Australia approve 
reciprocal agreement on social service 
benefits, 523. 
Italy- 
two democratic labour groups sign agree- 
ment to collaborate against com- 
munism, 521. 
Puerto Rico — 

re-organized company must carry out 
pension provisions of collective agree- 
ment, 23. 
Sweden — 

agreement signed between trade unions 
and industry provide wage provisions 
in last year's contract continue in 
force for steel workers in 1953, 364. 
U.S.A.— 

solutions re problem of converting escala- 
tor agreements to new consumer price 
index, 809. 

242 railroads sign union shop agreement, 
1117. 

six major railroads sign union shop agree- 
ments with non-operating rail unions, 
187. 

union shop and check-off agreement signed 
between several railroads and 17 co- 
operating railway labour organizations 
in Eastern States, 19. 

average time required by N.L.R.B. to 
settle a case, 1519. 

percentage of union contracts containing 
union security clauses, 993. 

unions urged to make long-term contracts 
as bar to representation vote, by 
decision of N.L.R.B.. 372. 



INDEX 



Agreements — Con . 
U.S.A.— Con. 

A.F. of L. — C.I.O. leaders sign no-raiding 
pact, 990. 

mutual assistance pact signed by Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters 
(A.F. of L) and Bakery and Con- 
fectionery Workers' International 
Union of America (A.F. of L.), 1597. 

four-year-no-raiding pact renewed between 
U.A.W. and I.A.M., 989. 

wage reduction for employees of Inter- 
national Harvester Company, in 
accordance with escalator clauses, 809. 

revision of U.A.W.'s escalator contracts 
accepted by General Motors Corpora- 
tion and Ford Motor Company, 809. 

year's holiday with pay after 10 years' 
service provided in agreement signed 
between Local 1031, I.B.E.W. and 
Hedco Manufacturing Company, 988. 

birthdays of truck drivers paid holidays 
in Boston under provisions of new 
contract, 1474. 

joint action in wage negotiations and 
organizing campaigns by Amalgamated 
Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen 
(A.F. of L.) and United Packinghouse 
Workers (C.I.O.), 1119. 

guaranteed wage provisions of contract 
negotiated by International Brother- 
hood of Teamsters for Rice-Stix Dry 
Goods Company, and Brown Shoe 
Company, 659. 

contract changes between U.A.W. and 
Chrysler Corporation, 809. 

Classification by Industries: 
Communicat ion — 

telephones, Province of Alberta, 1794, 1795. 
Construction — 

bricklayers, Calgary, 1633 ; Edmonton, 882 ; 
Ottawa, 1506; Sydney, 433; Vancou- 
ver, 1163. 

building trades, Hull district, 1032; 
Joliette, 596, 1167; Montreal, 432, 582, 
728, 886, 1326, 1636 ; Montreal district, 
1504; Quebec, 1168; Quebec district, 
433, 1032, 1327; Rimouski, 1328; St. 
Hyacinthe, 728, 1636; St. Jean and 
Iberville, 1504; St-Jerome, 911, 1327; 
Sherbrooke, 911; Trois-Rivieres, 729, 
1505; Trois-Rivieres district, 1636. 

carpenters, Belleville, 730; Fredericton, 
1162; Guelph, 1163; Moose Jaw, 1507; 
Niagara Falls, 434 ; Nova Scotia, 1323 ; 
Ottawa, 1500, 1507; Saint John, N.B., 
99, 434; Swift Current, 100, 1507; 
Sydney, 99 ; Toronto, 1500. 

electrical workers, Cornwall, 99; London, 
434. 



Agreements — Con. 
Classification by Industries — Con. 
Construction — Con. 
electricians, Ottawa, 1507; St. John's, Nfld., 

1162; Sarnia, 731; Toronto, 1500; 

(inside wiremen), Vancouver, 882; 

Welland, 1506. 
labourers, Halifax, 1794; Vancouver, 1164. 
lathers, Ottawa, 1168. 
painters, Calgary, 1169; Kingston, 434; 

Saint John, N.B., 99, 434; Saskatoon, 

1323; Sault-Ste-Marie, 1169; Toronto, 

1506. 
painters and decorators, Hamilton, 1168. 
plasterers, Edmonton, 1027; Sydney, 434. 
plumbers, Kingston, 1163; Moncton, 99, 

1168; Fredericton, 881; Ottawa, 100; 

Toronto, 1633; Welland, 731. 
plumbers and roofers, Trois-Rivieres, 1044, 

1798. 
roads, Province of British Columbia, 276, 

725. 
sheet metal workers, Ottawa, 100; Windsor, 

731. 
structural iron industry, Province of 

Quebec, 886. 
structural iron industry (erectors), Prov- 
ince of Quebec, 1327, 1505. 

Fishing — 

whaling, West Coast, 879. 

Logging- 
logging, British Columbia Coastal Region, 
1631. 

Manufacturing — 
aircraft, Toronto, 724. 
aluminum products, Isle-Maligne, Que., 

1162. 
automobiles, Windsor, 92, 93, 1794. 
bakeries, Calgary, 1793. 
bakery products, Calgary, 731; Quebec 

district, 281, 1502; Trois-Rivieres and 

district, 1326; Winnipeg, 880. 
bakery salesmen, Calgary, 731. 
bookbinders, Montreal, 1026. 
building materials industry, Province of 

Quebec, 283, 582, 728, 886. 
business machines, Toronto, 1793. 
canned fruits and vegetables, Vancouver, 

880. 
chemical products, Beauharnois, P.Q., 95. 
clothing, Toronto, 91. 
corrugated paper box industry, Province 

of Quebec, 432. 
cotton textiles, St-Hyacinthe, 1793. 
dress manufacturing industry, Province of 

Quebec, 1503. 
embroidery and other fashion accessories, 

Montreal, 426. 
explosives and fertilizers, McMasterville, 

P.Q., 881. 



[NDEX 



Agreements — Con. 
Manufacturing — Con. 

farm machinery, Brantford, 578. 

fashion accessories industry, Montreal, 885. 

fine grade paper, Ontario and Quebec, 577, 
1025. 

fish processing. Lunenburg, 425. 

food products manufacturing and whole- 
sale food trade, Quebec district, 281, 
1797. 

fruit and vegetable packing, British 
Columbia, 1792. 

furniture, Toronto, 92. 

garage employees, Sherbrooke, 1503. 

garages, Antigonish, 1026; Victoria, 1026. 

garages and service stations, Edmonton, 
101; Montreal, 1166; Rimouski, 97. 

glass processing industry, Quebec, 1167. 

grain mill products, Moose Jaw, 1631. 

handbags, Toronto, 881. 

hats and caps, Quebec and Ontario, 1025. 

knitting machine needles, Bedford, 1027. 

ladies' cloak and suit industry, Province 
of Quebec, 97, 1326. 

meat packing, Charlottetown, Montreal, 
Hull, Toronto, Peterborough, Winni- 
peg, Edmonton, and Vancouver, 275, 
1792. 

men's and boys' clothing industry, Prov- 
ince of Quebec, 283, 431, 1031. 

men's and boys' shirt manufacturing 
industry, Province of Quebec, 97, 581. 

metal products, Montreal, 723, 1161; 
Oshawa, 93, 1500; Toronto, 94, 1160; 
Toronto and St. Catharines, 427. 

metal smelting and refining, Trail, 94. 

metal trades, Quebec district, 1032, 1504. 

millinery industry, Province of Quebec, 
431. 

oil refining, Regina, Moose Jaw, Saskatoon 
and Rosetown, 1322; Vancouver, 95. 

ornamental iron and bronze workers, 
Montreal, Trois-Rivieres and Sher- 
brooke, 728; Montreal, Trois-Rivieres 
and Sherbrooke districts, 886. 

paper box industry (uncorrugated paper), 
District of Quebec, 1166. 

paper products, Toronto, 1322; Vancouver, 
723. 

plumbers and sheet metal workers, Moose 
Jaw, 1633. 

porcelain insulators, Hamilton, 725. 

printing and publishing, Hamilton, 577; 
Truro, 92. 

printing industry, Montreal, 97. 

printing pressmen, Montreal, 1025. 

printing trades, Montreal, 432, 728, 1031; 
Quebec district, 432, 885. 

pulp and paper, Kenogami and Riverbend, 
1632; Province of Ontario, 577. 



Agreements — Con. 
Manufacturing — Con. 

railway cars, Montreal, 578. 

rayon textiles, Cornwall, 426. 

retail fur industry, Montreal, 1165. 

rubber products, Granby, 1632; Hamilton, 
722; Toronto, 576. 

sheet metal manufacturing, Montreal, 1326, 
1503. 

sheet metal tools, Hamilton, 1161. 

shipbuilding, Montreal, 275. 

shipbuilding and repairing, Lauzon, P.Q., 
427. 

shipping containers, Toronto, 1499. 

shoes, Quebec, P.Q., 425. 

steel, Sydney, 578. 

tannery employees, Province of Quebec, 
885. 

textile products, Ajax, 1498. 

textiles, Marysville and Milltown, N.B., 
Cornwall and Hamilton, Ontario, 275. 

uncorrugated paper box industry, District 
of Quebec, 1798; Province of Quebec, 
581. 

veneer and plywood, Mattawa, 1499. 

whale processing, Coal Harbour, B.C., 879. 

wholesale food trade, Quebec district, 293. 

wood products, British Columbia Coastal 
Region, 1632; Sydney, 1632; Vancou- 
ver and New Westminster, 1793. 

Mining — 
asbestos mining, Matheson, Ontario, 1160. 
building materials industry, Province of 

Quebec, 281, 580, 728, 884. 
coal mining, Provinces of Alberta and 

British Columbia, 1631. 
fluorspar, St. Lawrence, Nfld., 425. 
iron mining, Steep Rock Lake, Ontario, 

1498. 
metal mining, Falconbridge, 576; Kimber- 

ley and Chapman Camp, B.C., 91. 

Public Utility Operation — 

electric light and power, Charlottetown, 
883. 

Service — 

building service, Montreal, 1028. 

fire fighters, Hamilton, 1501; Vancouver, 
1634. 

hospital and charitable institution em- 
ployees, Sherbrooke, 98. 

hospital employees, Vancouver, 726. 

hotels, New Westminster, 1635; Toronto, 
8g3; Vancouver, 1634. 

laundering, drycleaning and dyeing, Mont- 
real, 579. 

laundry, Sydney, 279. 

municipal employees, Hamilton, 1501; 
Moose Jaw, 1796; Trail, B.C., 1324. 

municipal government, Lethbridge, 1029. 

public administration, Province of Saskat- 
chewan, 280. 



VIII 



INDEX 



Agreements — Con. 
Service — Con. 
schools (teachers), Montreal, 1029. 
scientific services, Chalk River, 1325. 
tavern employees, Quebec, 1506. 

Trade— 
dairy, Calgary, 579, 1507. 
department store, Montreal, 1795. 
food products manufacturing and whole- 
sale food trade, Quebec. 1798. 
hardware, paint and building materials 

stores, Quebec, 1505. 
hospital nurses, Vancouver, 727. 
retail food stores, Quebec district, 283, 

1798. 

retail stores, Bell Island, Nfld., 726. 

Transportation, storage, communication— 
grain elevators, Fort William and Port 

Arthur, 1324. 
Transportation and Public Utilities- 
checkers (ocean navigation), .Quebec, 1167. 
freight handlers (longshoremen) (inland 

and coastal navigation), Montreal, 

1167. 
longshore work, St. John's, Newfound- 
land, 1634. 
longshoremen, Vancouver, 1164. 
longshoremen (ocean navigation), Quebec, 

1167. 
longshoremen, checkers and coopers (ocean 

and inland navigation), Sorel, 98. 
truck drivers, Montreal, 98; Province of 

Ontario, 1323; Province of Quebec, 95; 

Quebec, 1798. 
truck transportation, Vancouver and New 

Westminster, 883. 
urban and suburban transportation, 

Ottawa, 1028; Toronto, 277, 278, 279. 
urban and suburban transportation and gas 

and electricity supply, Winnipeg, 428, 

430. 

Agreements Resulting from Proceedings 
Under The Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act: 

British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 
(C.P.R.), and employees, 54. 

British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 
(C.P.R.), Canadian National Steam- 
ships, Union Steamships Limited, Van- 
couver, and employees, 1316. 

The Brookland Company Limited (Radio 
Station CHEX, Peterborough), and 
employees, 1770. 

The Brookland Company Limited (Radio 
Station CKWS, Kingston), and em- 
ployees, 1770. 

Canada Steamship Lines Limited, Montreal, 
and employees, 1629. 



Agreements Resulting from Proceedings 
Under the Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act 

— Con. 
Canada Steamship Lines, Limited, Colonial 
Steamships, Limited, N. M. Paterson 
and Sons Limited, Upper Lakes and 
St. Lawrence Transportation Company 
Limited, and employees, 1770. 
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and 

employees (editorial), 1475. 
Canadian National Newfoundland Steam- 
ship Service (C.N.R.), and employees. 
1629. 
Canadian National Railways and employees 
(Nova Scotian Hotel, Halifax), 1628. 
Canadian National Railways (Atlantic, Cen- 
tral and Western Regions), and em- 
ployees, 606. 
Canadian National Railways and employees 
(Canadian National Newfoundland 
Steamship Service), 1629. 
Canadian National Railways, Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company, Toronto, 
Hamilton and Buffalo Railway Com- 
pany, and Ontario Northland Railway, 
and various railway labour organiza- 
tions, 240. 
Canadian National Steamships, Canadian 
National Railways (Barge and Ferry 
Service, Port Mann, Barge and Ferry 
Service, Okanagan Lake), Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company (B.C. Coast 
Steamship Service), Union Steamships 
Limited, Frank Waterhouse and Com- 
pany of Canada Limited, and em- 
ployees, 1314. 
Canadian National Steamships, Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company (B.C. Coast 
Steamship Service), Canadian Na- 
tional Railways (B.C. Coast and B.C. 
Lakes Barge and Ferry Service), 
Union Steamships Limited, Frank 
Waterhouse and Company of Canada, 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees, 
1314. 
Canadian Overseas Telecommunications Cor- 
poration, and employees, 1156. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company (British 
Columbia Coast Steamship Service), 
and employees, 54. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and 
employees (dining, cafe and buffet 
car employees), 606. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company (East- 
ern, Prairie and Pacific Regions), and 
employees, 606. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and 
Canadian National Railways, and em- 
ployees, 420. 



INDEX 



IX 



Agreements Resulting from Proceedings 
Under the Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act 

— Con. 

Canadian Stevedoring Company Limited. 
Empire Stevedoring Company Limit- 
ed. Louis Wolfe and Sons (Vancou- 
ver) Limited, and Victoria and Van- 
couver Stevedoring Company Limit- 
ed, and employees, 420. 

Colonial Steamships Limited, Port Col- 
bourne, and employees, 1770. 

Colonial Steamships, Limited, N. M. Pater- 
son and Sons, Limited, Upper Lakes 
and St. Lawrence Transportation Com- 
pany, Limited, and employees, 1629. 

Giant Yellowknife Gold Mines Limited, and 
employees, 699. 

Keystone Transports Limited, and em- 
ployees, 874. 

McCabe Grain Company Limited (Seed 
Plant), St. Boniface, and employees, 
1770. 

National Harbours Board, Halifax, and em- 
ployees, 1629. 

Newfoundland Coal Company, and 
employees, 1022. 

Newfoundland Employers' Association 
Limited (General Cargo), St. John's, 
and employees, 1022. 

Northern Telephone Company, Limited, 
New Liskeard, and employees, 1770. 

Northland Navigation Company Limited, 
and Shipping Federation of British 
Columbia, Vancouver, 420. 

Nova Scotian Hotel, Halifax, (C.N.R.), and 
employees, 1628. 

'Ottawa Transportation Commission, and em- 
ployees, 420. 

N. M. Paterson and Sons, Limited, Colonial 
Steamships, Limited, and Upper Lakes 
and St. Lawrence Transportation 
Company, Limited, and employees, 
1629. 

Purity Flour Mills Limited, Calgary, and 
employees, 1156. 

Quebec Central Transportation Company, 
Sherbrooke, and employees, 1315. 

Railway Association of Canada, and em- 
ployees, 606. 

Railway Express Agenc3 r , Inc., and em- 
ployees, 1156. 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited, Saska- 
toon, and employees, 1023. 

Shipping Federation of British Columbia 
and Northland Navigation Company 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees, 
420. 
94375—2 



Agreements Resulting from Proceedings 
Under the Industrial Relation* 
and Disputes Investigation Act 

— Con. 

Sorel Dock and Stevedoring Company 
Limited, J. C. A. Turcotte, and em- 
ployees, 1629. 

J. C. A. Turcotte, Sorel Dock and Stevedor- 
ing Company Limited, and employees, 
1629. 

Upper Lakes and St. Lawrence Transporta- 
tion Company Limited, Colonial 
Steamships, Limited, and N. M. Pater- 
son and Sons, Limited, and employees, 
1629. 

Vancouver Barge Transportation Limited, 
and employees, 420. 

Yukon Consolidated Gold Corporation, and 
employees, 699. 

Agricultural Implements : 

Canada — 
resolution adopted at convention of C.C. 
of L. re establishment of Farm Imple- 
ment Council to aid unemployment in 
farm implement industry, 1444. 

Agriculture : 

ratification of I.L.O. Holidays with Pay 
Convention, respecting agriculture in 
New Zealand, 1625. 

I.L.O. Convention providing annual paid 
holiday for agricultural workers, 
ratified by Sweden, 1625. 
Canada — 

tenth annual Federal-Provincial Farm 
Labour Conference (1952), 43. 

plan to overcome slump in production of 
farm machinery submitted by steel 
and auto workers, to federal govern- 
ment, 17. 

extension of unemployment insurance 
coverage to some types of farm 
workers urged by National Advisory 
Council on Manpower, 22. 

number of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1946. 1950, and 1951, 
1294, 1296. 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in agriculture in 1941 
and 1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 
1951 Census bulletin, 28. 
Ont.: N.E.S. recruitment of workers from 
Maritime and Prairie Provinces to aid 
in general farm work, haymaking and 
harvesting, 992. 
New Zealand — 

ratification of I.L.O. Holidays with Pay 
Convention, 1625. 
Sweden — 

I.L.O. convention providing annual paid 
holiday for agricultural workers rati- 
fied by Sweden, 1625. 



INDEX 



Agriculture, Department of: 

annual report on co-operatives, prepared 
by Economics Branch, 1604. 

Aid: 

See Colombo Plan; Student Aid. 

Air Line Pilots' Association: 

death of David L. Behncke, founder and 
first president, 657. 

Aircraft Industry : 

Canada — 

specialized training program for "trade 
improvement" in aircraft industry by 
C.V.T. and Northwest Industries, 
Limited, Edmonton, 816. 

program for expanded aircraft production 
— report on industrial expansion, 1948- 
1952, in the transportation industry, 
513. 

plant expansion and employment oppor- 
tunities in 1952, 15. 

Alta.: specialized training program for "trade 
improvement" in aircraft industry, by 
C.V.T. and Northwest Industries, 
Limited, Edmonton, 816. 

Ont.: effects of plant expansion on employ- 
ment, 1948-53, 1005. 

Alberta : 

See various subject headings. 

Alberta Federation of Labour (T. and L.C.) : 

annual convention, 1006. 

Allowances : 

Alta.— 

amended regulations under Supplemen- 
tary Allowances Act re recipients of 
old age security pension, blind per- 
sons' allowance or old age assistance 
allowance, 442. 

Man.: amendments to Workmen's Compen- 
sation Act re children and orphans, 
1034. 

N.S.: amendments to Workmen's Compen- 
sation Act re children, orphans and 
dependents, 1034. 

Ont.: amended provisions of Mothers' 
Allowances Act, 1646; amendments to 
Workmen's Compensation Act re pay- 
ment of benefits to widow and children 
of deceased workman, 1639. 
See also Blind Persons; Handicapped Per- 
sons; Pensions; Workmen's Compen- 
sation. 



Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher 
Workmen (A.F. of L) : 

U.S.A.— 
joint action in wage negotiations and 
organizing campaigns by Meat Cutters 
and United Packinghouse Workers 
(C.I.O.), 1119. 

American Federation of Labour: 

72nd annual convention, 1617. 
trade union membership, 817, 1257; mem- 
bership in 1951, 404. 
numbers of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1951, by affiliation, 
1295. 
revision of organizing machinery, 1119. 
expulsion of International Longshoremen's 
Association from the Federation, 1617. 
suspension of International Longshoremen's 

Association by A.F. of L., 1267. 
establishment of International Longshore- 
men's Association (A.F. of L), 1618. 
application of certain longshoremen for 
charter for new union to be known as 
American Federation of Longshore- 
men, 1267. 
urges all affiliates to seek wage increases, 

362. 
no-raiding pact between A.F. of L. and 

C.I.O., 660, 990, 1424, 1617. 

no-raiding pact signed by International 

Association of Machinists (A.F. of 

L.) and United Rubber Workers 

(C.I.O.), 1259. 

A.F. of L. to settle for amendment rather 

than repeal of Taft-Hartley Act, 30. 

recommendations of executive council at 

conference, 1258. 
re secession of United Brotherhood of 

Carpenters from A.F. of L., 1258. 
joint action in wage negotiations and 
organizing campaigns by Amalgamated 
Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen 
(A.F. of L.) and United Packing- 
house Workers (C.I.O.), 1119. 
locals of United Brewery Workers of 
America (C.I.O.) join brewery divi- 
sion of International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters (A.F. of L.), 1120. 
representation elections during 1952— 

annual report of N.L.R.B., 1159. 
number of members of C.I.O. textile unions 
transferred to A.F. of L. United 
Textile Workers of America, 24. 
two Canadian officials of International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters (A.F. of 
L.), dismissed, 1118. 
top positions in U.S. Department of 
Labour held by A.F. of L. officials, 
1115. 



INDEX 



American Federation of Labour — Con. 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America return to A.F. of 
L., 1425. 

extracts from address of Toney Gallo as 
fraternal delegate to 68th convention 
of T. and L.C., 1287. 

death of Mrs. Gertrude Gompers, widow 
of founder of A.F. of L., 1266. 

United Textile Workers of America (A.F. 
of L. — T. and L.C.) defeated by 
C.I.O. rival, Textile Workers' Union 
of America (C.C. of L. — C.I.O.) , in 
two Ontario, Canada, plants, 369. 

American Federation of Musicians: 

James C. Petrillo re-elected president, 993. 

American Federation of Technical Engineers : 

affiliates with T. and L.C, 1604. 

American Radio Association (C.I.O.) : 

jurisdiction over radio and electronic com- 
munications on certain ships won by 
Association, 1607. 

Anniversaries : 

Canada — 
two Toronto locals mark 50th anniversary, 
1267. 

N.B.: 50th anniversary of Saint John Print- 
ing Pressmen and Assistants' Union 
No. 36, 1335; and of Saint John Trades 
and Labour Council (T. and L.C), 
370. 

Ont.: 50th anniversary of Local 25, Fort 
William, Bricklayers, Masons and 
Plasterers' International Union of 
America, 370. 

U.S.A.— 

70th anniversary of Brotherhood of Rail- 
road Trainmen, 1428. 

Annual Conventions: 

See Trade Unions. 

Annual Holidays: 

See Holidays; Vacations with Pay. 

Annual Reports: 

Canada — 
annual report of Federal Department of 

Labour (1952), 19. 
N.B.: annual report of Department of 

Labour (1952), 1011. 
Ont.: annual report of Department of 

Labour (1951), 435. 
Sask.: annual report of Department of 

Labour for 1951, 690. 
94375— 2J 



Annual Reports — Con. 
U.S.A.— 
annual report of Department of Labour, 
1604. 

Annual Wage: 

See Guaranteed Wage; Wages. 

Annuities: 

Canada — 

extracts from Hansard re Government 

Annuities Act, 389. 
recommendations of T. and L.C, 535, 1291. 

Anti-Discrimination : 

See Discrimination. 

Apprenticeship : 

Canada — 

registration of apprentices in designated 
trades compulsory in Ontario, Mani- 
toba, Alberta and British Columbia, 
26. 

apprenticeship clause in collective agree- 
ments in manufacturing industries in 
1952, 224. 

need for skilled workers in Canadian 
industry, stressed, 1259. 

CM .A. warns industry to train personnel 
now to assure adequate supply of 
skilled labour, 816. 

Government to continue training program 
for student draftsmen, 368. 

lack of skilled labour acute — apprenticeship 
training urged by C.P.R. officer, 1423. 

R.T.B. seeks federal aid for apprentice- 
ship, 547. 

manpower problems in an expanding 
economy — discussion by Manpower 
Problems panel at annual meeting of 
C.M.A., 1002. 

greater emphasis on apprenticeship urged 
by Presidents of T. and L.C and 
C.M.A., 1423. 

need for more Canadian apprentices 
stressed by Ontario provincial Depart- 
ment of Labour official, 988. 

illustration of Department of Labour 
exhibit shown at Canadian fairs and 
exhibitions during 1953, 986-87. 

apprenticeship plan devised by skilled 
trades council of the United Automo- 
bile Workers, 519. 

bricklayers' apprentices to demonstrate 
skill in competition at C.N.E., 816. 

resolution adopted at convention of T. 
and L.C, 1290. 



INDEX 



Apprenticeship — Con 

Canada — Con. 
Apprenticeship Training Advisory Com- 
mittee — 3rd meeting, 865; report on 
inquiry concerning compulsory legis- 
lation in various provinces, made to 
Committee by Training Branch, De- 
partment of Labour, 26; joint con- 
ference of Committee and provincial 
Directors of Apprenticeship, 1608 ; 
recommends greater uniformity in 
apprentice training, 29. 
Vocational Training — progress report of 
Assistant Director, 1751 ; report of 
Supervisor of Trade Training, 1751 ; 
extension of Apprenticeship Agree- 
ment, 1751, 1752; report of semi- 
annual conference of Council, 397, 399. 

Alta.: regulations under Tradesmen's Quali- 
fication Act, 587; new regulations 
under Apprenticeship Act, 1654; weld- 
ing designated as trade under Appren- 
ticeship Act, 1343; compulsory regis- 
tration of apprentices in designated 
trades, 26. 

B.C.: compulsory registration of apprentices 
in designated trades, 27. 

Man.: amendments to Apprenticeship Act, 
1344; compulsory registration of 
apprentices in designated trades, 26. 

N.B.: apprenticeship legislation, 26; annual 
report of Department of Labour 
(1952), 1012. 

Nfld.: appointment of Director of Appren- 
ticeship, 368; Company trains workers 
before it opens — apprentice training 
program in co-operation with Cana- 
dian Vocational Training Branch, 
federal Department of Labour, 368 ; 
members of Apprenticeship Board, 
named, 988. 

N.S.: new general regulations under Appren- 
ticeship Act, 291. 

Ont.: compulsory registration of apprentices 
in designated trades, 26; support of 
employers in training apprentices 
urged by official of Department of 
Labour, 368; need for more Canadian 
apprentices stressed by provincial De- 
partment of Labour official, 988; plan 
permits students half day at work, 
half at school, 368; administration of 
Act in 1950-51, 437. 

Que.: establishment of Montreal Building 
Trades Apprenticeship Centre by 
Joint Montreal Committee of the 
Building Trades, 519; Apprenticeship 
Commission of the Printing Trades 
of the City of Montreal has 452 
apprentices — summary of annual re- 
port, 1424. 



Apprenticeship — Con . 

Sask.: apprenticeship legislation, 26; amend- 
ed regulations under Apprenticeship 
and Tradesmen's Qualification Act, 
1816; change in membership of Pro- 
vincial Apprenticeship Board, 25; 
appointment of Director of Appren- 
ticeship Branch, Department of 
Labour, 1261 ; resolution adopted by 
Provincial Federation of Labour, 1756 ; 
annual report of Apprenticeship and 
Tradesmen's Qualification Branch, De- 
partment of Labour (1951), 691. 

U.S.A.— 

expansion of training programs urged at 
New York state Apprenticeship Con- 
ference, 1735. 

Arbitration: 

Canada — 

compulsory and binding arbitration in 
place of right to strike in disputes 
involving public health and safety, 
recommended by Canadian Bar Asso- 
ciation, 1426; criticism of T. and L. 
C, 1426. 
compulsory arbitration rather than right 
to strike, sought by National Federa- 
tion of Public Employees, 1263. 

Alta.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1036; 
amendments to Labour Relations Act 
providing compulsory arbitration in 
disputes involving firemen and police- 
men, 1035; new sections under Fire 
Departments Platoon Act provide for 
collective bargaining and compulsory 
arbitration of disputes, 1799; provi- 
sions of Police Act, 1800. 

B.C.: criticism of Industrial Conciliation 
and Arbitration Act by B.C. Trade 
Union Congress (T. and L.C.), 1616. 

N.B.: provisions of first collective agree- 
ment between government department 
and I.B.E.W.. 371. 

Ont.: High Court o: Justice finds Arbitra- 
tion Act applicable to clause in agree- 
ment between engineers and City of 
Hamilton, 441 ; compulsory arbitra- 
tion opposed by vice-chairman of 
Labour Relations Board, 815. 

P.E.I. : new section re arbitration in dis- 
putes added to regulations under 
Trade Union Act, 1347. 

Que.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1035; 
Arbitration Board finds proposed 
agreement between clothing factory 
and union "one that the employer 
can properly sign" and criticizes firm 
for move to bar union, 518; Court of 
Queen's Bench. Appeal Side . . . finds 



INDEX 



XIII 



Arbitration — Con. 

Que. — Con. 

check-off a "condition of employment" 
coming within jurisdiction of arbitra- 
tion board, 895; recommendations of 
Provincial Federation of Labour (T. 
and L.C.), 1010. 

Sask.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1036; 
amendments to Labour Relations Act 
providing compulsory arbitration in 
disputes involving firemen and police- 
men, 1035; amended provisions of 
City Act and Fire Departments Pla- 
toon Act re compulsory arbitration of 
disputes between firemen and police- 
men, 1648. 

United Kingdom — 

resolution adopted by T.U.C. rejects . . . 
wage restraint which interferes with 
freedom of collective bargaining and 
independent arbitration, 1622. 

India — 

Government proposals for changes in 
industrial relations legislation studied 
by Indian Labour Conference, 739. 
See also Agreements; Conciliation; Indus- 
trial Disputes; Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act; 
Strikes and Lockouts. 

Armed Forces: 

- Canada — 

availability of manpower for armed forces 
studied by National Advisory Council 
on Manpower, 22. 

trade training for armed services — report 
of semi-annual conference of Voca- 
tional Training Advisory Council, 397. 

progress report of Assistant Director of 
Vocational Training re civilian teach- 
ers for armed services, 1751 ; re trade 
training, 1750. 

Arts and Crafts: 
Que.— 

arts and craft school opened at St. Johns. 
Quebec, 810. 

Asbestos: 

Canada — 
settlement of charges pending against 
Quebec asbestos strikers recommended 
by C.C.C.L., 1470. 

Asia: 

I.L.O.'s Third Asian Regional Conference. 
1624. 

Association of International Government 
Labour Officials: 

40th annual convention, 1045. 



Australia: 

new medical benefits program, 1122. 
immigration quota reduced, 369. 

Automotive Industry: 

Canada — 

plan to overcome slump in production of 

farm machinery submitted by auto 

workers to federal government, 17. 
U.A.W. chiefs urge auto manufacturers to 

level off production in order to prevent 

unemployment, 810. 

Ont.: effects of plant expansion on employ- 
ment. 1948-53, 1005. 

U.S.A.— 

guaranteed annual wage plan proposed by 
U.A.W. , opposed by Ford Motor Com- 
pany spokesman, 1599. 

higher pensions granted in Ford — U.A.W. 
contract, 809. 

pension benefits paid by General Motors 
raised, 984. 

revision of U.A.W.'s escalator contracts 
accepted by General Motors Corpora- 
tion and Ford Motor Company, 809. 

wage increases sought by United Auto 
Workers (C.I.O.), 362. 

end of 14-year-old strike at Peterson 
Chevrolet Company, 1365. 

See also United Automobile Workers of 
America. 

Baby Bonus: 

See Family Allowances. 

Bakery and Confectionery Workers' Inter- 
national Union of America (A.F. 
of L.) : 

mutual assistance pact signed with Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters 
(A.F. of L), 1597. 

Ballew, John A., United States Labour 
Attache (Canada): 
appointment, 516. 

Barbers and Hairdressers: 

Nfld.— 

amended provisions of Shops (Barbers' and 
Hairdressers') Closing Hour Act, St. 
John's, 1803. 
Que.: validity of decree under Collective 
Agreement Act fixing minimum hair- 
dressing rates, upheld, 1808. 

Baron, Sam, Canadian Director, United Tex- 
tile Workers of America: 
resignation, 365. 



XIV 



INDEX 



Beauty Culture: 

Alta.: regulations under Tradesmen's Quali- 
fication Act, 587. 

Behncke, David L. : 

death of founder and first president of 
Air Line Pilots Association, 657. 

Belgium : 

results of survey on unemployment among 

older workers, 217. 
ratification of ILO Convention concerning 

migration for employment, .1625. 
profit-sharing and joint management strike 

issues at machine shop plant, 688. 

Benefits : 

Canada — 

monthly tabular report on current unem- 
ployment insurance statistics, 5, 176, 
350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 1256, 1420, 
1594, 1730. 

workmen's compensation paid to Canadian 
workers in 1952, 1427. 

new order under Department of Veterans 
Affairs Act re workmen's compensa- 
tion benefits, 442. 

Veterans Benefit Act (1951) extended, 1511. 

Veterans Benefit Regulations under Can- 
ada Veterans Benefit Act, 584. 

provisions of Public Service Superannua- 
tion Act, 1511. 

amended provisions of Merchant Seamen 
Compensation Act, 1509, 1510. 

text of report of Unemployment Insur- 
ance Advisory Committee (1952-53), 
1819. 

holiday pay and severance pay — amend- 
ments to unemployment insurance 
benefit regulations, 1660. 

unemployment insurance benefit continues 
during illness, injury or quarantine — 
amended provisions of Unemployment 
Insurance Act, 1116, 1509. 

amendments to Unemployment Insurance 
Act recommended by C.C.C.L., 1468. 

recommendation of Political Action Com- 
mittee of C.C. of L. re unemployment 
insurance benefits, 361. 

B.C.: amendment to Hospital Insurance 
Regulations under Act, 1343; recom- 
mendations of Chief Justice Sloan re 
increased benefits under Workmen's 
Compensation Act, 567; full benefits 
of provincial Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Act extended to civil defence 
workers, 1115. 



Benefits — Con. 

Ont.: amendments to Workmen's Compen- 
sation Act re payment of benefits to 
widow and children of deceased work- 
man, 1639. 

Sask.: amended provisions of Workmen's 
Compensation (Accident Fund) Act, 
1647. 

Australia — 

new medical benefits program, 1122. 
U.S.A.— 

payments for pensions and other welfare 

benefits by U.S. corporations, 1266. 
adequacy of unemployment insurance 

benefits studied, 1824. 
See also Fringe Benefits; Pensions; Work- 
men's Compensation. 

Bengough, Percy R., President, Trades and 
Labour Congress of Canada: 

presidential address at 68th annual con- 
vention of T. and L.C., 1282. 

remarks at presentation of annual memor- 
andum to Cabinet, 531. 

New Year's message, 1758. 

Labour Day message, 1126. 

remarks on 80th anniversary of T. and 
L.C., 515. 

receives honourary Doctor of Law degree 
from St. Francis Xavier University, 
993 ; from University of British Colum- 
bia, 1737. 

criticizes recommendations of Canadian 
Bar Association, 1426. 

on suspension of United Fishermen and 
Allied Workers' Union, 1425. 

on dismissal of two Canadian officials 
from International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters (A.F. of L.), 1118. 

urges greater emphasis on apprenticeship, 
1423. 

elected to executive board of Inter- 
American Regional Organization of 
Workers (O.R.I.T.), part of I.C.F.T.U., 
188. 

Beverages : 

Canada — 
number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in food and beverage industry, 222. 

Bill of Rights: 

adoption recommended by C.C. of L., 538; 

recommendation of Political Action 

Committee, 361. 
enactment urged by T. and L.C., 1291. 
See also Civil Rights. 



INDEX 



xv 



Bishop, Mariano, Executive Vice-President, 
Textile Workers' Union of America: 
death of, 366. 

Bitan, Moshe, North American Representative 
of Histadrut: 
extracts from address at 68th convention 
of T. and L.C., 1287. 

Blackburn, George G., Director of Informa- 
tion, Department of Labour: 
presents memorandum The Problem of the 
Older Worker, to National Advisory 
Council on Manpower, 203. 

Blacksmiths: 

formation of International Brotherhood of 
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, 
Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers — 
amalgamation of boilermakers' and 
blacksmiths' unions in Canada and 
U.S.A, 1118. 

Bladen, Dr. V. M., University of Toronto: 
Canadian member of Guaranteed Wage 
Public Advisory Committee of U.A.W., 
658. 

Blasting: 

Alta.— 
revised regulations under Quarries Regu- 
lation Act, 1656. 

Blind Persons : 

Canada — 

number of persons receiving assistance 
under The Blind Persons Act as at — 
September 30, 1952. 25; December 31, 
1952, 370; March 31, 1953, 662; June 
30, 1953, 1261; September 30, 1953. 
1736. 
extracts from Hansard re old age and 

blind pensions, 833. 
enrolment in schools for blind and deaf 

persons in 1950-51, 1429. 
C.C. of L. recommends increase in allow- 
ance and abolition of means test, 538. 
Alta.: amended regulations under Supple- 
mentary Allowances Act, 442. 
Nfld.: new regulations under Blind Persons 
Allowances Act, 116; amendment to 
Act, 1803. 
Sask.: amended regulations under Social 

Aid Act, 116. 
N.W.T.: provisions of Old Age Assistance 
and Blind Persons Allowance Ordi- 
nance, 893. 
Yukon: provisions of Old Age Assistance 
and Blind Persons Allowance Ordi- 
nance, 894. 



Boilermakers : 

formation of International Brotherhood of 
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, 
Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers — 
amalgamation of boilermakers' and 
blacksmiths' unions in Canada and 
U.S.A., 1118. 

Boilers : 

Alta.— 

administration of Boilers Act transferred 
to Department of Industries and 
Labour, 1039, 1343, 1802. 

B.C. : revised regulations under British 
Columbia Boiler Inspection Act, 1519. 

N.B.: inspections during 1952, 1012. 

Nfld.: amended regulations under Boiler and 
Pressure Vessel Act, 1038, 1347, 1803. 

Ont.: Boilers and Pressure Vessels Act, 1038, 
1184, 1642; boiler inspections in 1950- 
51, 436. 

Sask.: new regulations under Boiler and 
Pressure Vessel Act covering safe 
handling of liquefied petroleum gas, 
1348; activities of Boilers, Factories 
and Elevators Branch, Department of 
Labour (1951), 692. 

N.W.T.: regulations (Canadian Regulations 
for Construction and Inspection of 
Boilers and Pressure Vessels) under 
Steam Boilers Ordinance (1951), 891. 

Yukon : amended provisions of Steam Boilers 
Ordinance, 894. 

Bonds: 

See Canada Savings Bonds. 

Bonus: 

Canada — 
bonus plans included in provisions of col- 
lective agreements in manufacturing 
industries in 1952, 224. 

Bookbinders: 

See International Brotherhood of Book- 
binders. 

Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers' Inter- 
national Union of America: 

Local No. 1, Saint John, N.B., names Hon. 
A. E. Skaling, Minister of Labour, 
honorary life president, 18. 

50th anniversar}' of Local 25, Fort William, 
Ont., 370. 

Bricklaying: 

Canada — 
bricklayers' apprentices to demonstrate 
skill in competition at C.N.E., 816. 



XVI 



INDEX 



Bridges : 

See Building and Construction. 

Bridges, Harry, President, International Long- 
shoremen's Association: 
perjury charges thrown out by Supreme 
Court— citizenship restored, 993. 

British Columbia: 

See various subject headings. 

B.C. Federation of Labour (C.C. of L.) : 

annual convention, 1007. 

B.C. Fisheries Association: 

herring operations closed — operators' price 
offer rejected by United Fishermen 
and Allied Workers' Union (T. and 
L.C.), 23. 

British Columbia Gillnetters' Association: 

merges with Seafarers' International Union, 
1257. 

British North America Act: 

amendments recommended in resolution 
adopted at convention of C.C. of L., 
1445. 

amendment to Act recommended b}^ T. 
and L.C., 534. 

British Columbia Trade Union Congress 
(T. and L.C.) : 
first annual convention, 1616. 
criticism of Canadian Bar Association, 
1616. 

British Trades Union Congress: 

85th annual conference, 1620. 

extracts from address of Arthur Deakin 
as fraternal delegate to 68th annual 
convention of T. and L.C, 1286. 

re history of British unionism, 1316. 

Broadcasting: 

Canada — 

C.C.C.L. requests free broadcasting time 
on C.B.C. for industrial workers, 542. 

R.T.B. re-affirms support of public owner- 
ship and government control of, 547. 

resolution adopted by T. and L.C. re free 
radio and television time for labour 
organizations, 1291. 

See also Canadian Broadcasting Corpora- 
tion. 



Brotherhood of Express Employees (C.C. of 
L.): 

C.C. of L. union merges with Brotherhood 
of Railway and Steamship Clerks, 
Freight Handlers, Express and Station 
Employees (A.F. of L. — T. and L.C), 
516. 

Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers: 

U.S.A.— 

unity bid by Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Firemen and Enginemen rejected by 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, 
1119. 

Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and 
Enginemen : 

U.S.A.— 
unity bid by Brotherhood rejected by 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, 
1119. 

Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen: 

Canada — 

railway strike averted — settlement between 
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen 
and Canada's railways, 187. 

Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship 
Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express 
and Station Employees (A.F. of 
L.— T. and L.C): 

Canada — 

Brotherhood of Express Employees (C.C 
of L.) merges with A.F. of L. railway 
clerks, 516. 

Brown, Arthur H., Deputy Minister of Labour: 
appointment, 411. 
attendance, as Assistant Deputy Minister 

of Labour, at 120th session of I.L.O. 

Governing Body, 232. 
appointment as co-chairman of National 

Advisory Council on Manpower, 1731. 
remarks at meeting of Apprenticeship 

Training Advisory Committee, 865. 

Brown Shoe Company: 

guaranteed wage provisions of contract 
negotiated by International Brother- 
hood of Teamsters for, 659. 

Building and Construction: 

4th session of I.L.O. Building, Civil Engi- 
neering and Public Works Committee 
— studies guaranteed wages and in- 
creased productivity; other recom- 
mendations, 1625, 1764, 1766. 



INDEX 



XVII 



Building and Construction — Con. 
Canada — 

proceedings of joint conference of Appren- 
ticeship Training Advisory Committee 
and provincial Directors of Appren- 
ticeship, 1608. 

amended provisions of National Housing 
Act, 1511-12. 

convention proceedings of Canadian Con- 
struction Association, 189. 

wage-rate changes in collective agreements, 
first nine months of 1952, 220. 

largest federal-provincial public housing 
project in Canada underway in Hamil- 
ton, Ontario, 190. 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in construction indus- 
try in 1941 and 1951 as reported in 
D.B. of S. 1951 Census bulletin, 28. 

number of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 
1294, 1296. 

industrial expansion, 1948-1952, in trans- 
portation equipment industry, 513. 

increase in residential construction in 
1952 — annual report of Central Mort- 
gage and Housing Corporation, 517. 

"A Code of Construction Safety Measures" 
— summary of section of National 
Building Code (1953), 992. 

housing statistics, 18, 365, 1117, 1260, 1601. 
Alta.: resolution requesting special section 
in Alberta Labour Act, approved at 
convention of Federation of Labour 
(T. and L.C.), 1007. 
B.C.: amendments to Male and Female 
Minimum Wage Acts, 1040; order 
under Male Minimum Wage Act 
provides higher minimum rate for 
construction industry, 443; annual 
convention of United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners — proposal to 
seek 6-hour day, 30-hour week reject- 
ed; seeks "fringe" benefits, holiday 
pay, etc., 23. 
Man: schedule of minimum rates of wages 
and maximum hours of work pre- 
scribed by Fair Wage Board for cer- 
tain public and private construction 
work, 1181; blanket collective agree- 
ment covering 11 local unions signed 
between Winnipeg Building Trades 
Council and Winnipeg Builders' Ex- 
change, 811. 
Ont.: largest federal-provincial public hous- 
ing project in Canada underway in 
Hamilton, 190; amendment to Factory, 
Shop and Office Building Act re con- 
struction of certain buildings, 1039; 
annual report of Department of 
Labour (1950-51), 436. 



Building and Construction — Con. 
Que.: establishment of Montreal Building 
Trades Apprenticeship Centre by Joint 
Montreal Committee of the Building 
Trades, 519; Court of the Sessions of 
the Peace, Terrebonne . . . finds fair 
wage schedule, not Collective Agree- 
ment Act decree, applies to bridge 
builder, 1043; refrigeration company 
must pay painters, carpenters rates 
set in construction trade decree, 1810; 
charge that city of St. Jean had em- 
ployed carpenters without certificates 
required by parity committee, dis- 
missed, 583. 
United Kingdom— 

in id-century report of Chief Factory In- 
spector compares working conditions 
in factories in 1951 with those of 
1901, 1310. 

post-war housing record set in 1952, 517. 

completion of permanent houses in Sep- 
tember, 1952, 18. 
India — 

extension of subsidized housing scheme for 
industrial workers, 1117. 
U.S.A.— 

increase in wage scales of building con- 
struction workers, 30. 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America return to A.F. of 
L„ 1425. 

housing statistics, 18, 365, 1117, 1601. 

See also Agreements; Housing; Minimum 
Wages; Strikes and Lockouts. 

Building Trades: 

Man.— 
blanket collective agreement covering 11 
local unions signed between Winnipeg- 
Building Trades Council and Winni- 
peg Builders' Exchange, 811. 

Buildings: 

See Public Buildings. 

Bulgaria : 

forced labour law enacted, 1136. 

Burt, George, Vice-President, Canadian Con- 
gress of Labour: 
elected to executive board of Inter- 
American Regional Organization of 
Workers (O.R.I.T.). part of I.C.F.T.U., 
188. 

Business: 

Canada — 
Canadian business controlled elsewhere at 
close of 1951, 1798. 



XVIII 



INDEX 



Business — Con. 

Alta.: new regulations under Licensing of 
Trades and Businesses Act, 115. 

N.W.T.: amended provisions of Business 
Licence Ordinance, 892. 

Yukon: licensing of trades and businesses- 
provisions of Business Licence Ordi- 
nance (1952), 894. 

Caisses Populaires: 

Que.:— 
retroactive pay deposited in caisses popu- 
laires by members of Arvida Alumi- 
nium Syndicate (C.C.C.L.), 1604. 

Call-in Pay: 

Canada — 

call-in pay in manufacturing industry in 
1951, 1532. 

Campbell, Ian, National Co-ordinator of Civi- 
lian Rehabilitation: 
remarks at sessions of National Advisory 
Committee on the Rehabilitation of 
the Disabled, 367, 1746; at meeting of 
National Advisory Council on Man- 
power, 22. 

Canada : 

See various subject headings. 

"Canada": 

publication of 1953 edition of official hand- 
book on all phases of Canada's 
economic organization, 994. 

Canada Fair Employment Practices Act: 

provisions, 1508. 

Canada Labour Relations Board: 

appointment of C. Rhodes Smith, Q.C., as 

chairman of Board, 1257. 
amendment to I.R.D.I. Act recommended 

by T. and L.C, 533. 

Canada Safeway Limited: 

See Legal Decisions. 

Canada Savings Bonds: 

extracts from Hansard re printing of, 32. 

Canada Shipping Act: 

Certification of Ships' Cooks Regulations, 
1342. 

Pilots' Pension Fund Regulations for 
Montreal Pilotage District, 1343. 

pilotage by-laws of British Columbia Dis- 
trict, 114, 1815; District of Caraquet. 
N.B., 442; Halifax, 1342; District of 
Humber Arm, Nfld., 1814; Montreal, 
1343; Montreal district, 1814; New 
Westminster, 1343; Port aux Basques, 
Nfld., 1653; district of Quebec, 289; 
St. Lawrence-Kingston-Ottawa, 1342; 
district of Sydney, N.S., 114. 



Canada Veterans Benefit Act: 

Veterans Benefit Regulations, 584. 

Canada Year Book: 

1952-53 issue released by D.B. of S., 661. 

Canadian and Catholic Confederation of 
Labour : 

32nd annual convention, 1458. 

Labour Day message of Gerard Picard, 
General President, 1129. 

New Year's message of Gerard Picard, 
General President, 1761. 

Dominion legislative program, 539; reply 
of Prime Minister, 543. 

conference proceedings of C.C.C.L. and 
C.C. of L. shipyard unions, 1458. 

Federation of The Wrought Wood Workers 
of Canada — amalgamation of wrought 
wood and furniture federations of 
C.C.C.L, 1258. 

National Catholic Textile Federation seeks 
royal inquiry into textile industry, 
1264. 

numbers of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1954, by affiliation, 1295. 

retirement of Rene Rocque, organizer and 
assistant director of organization 
service, 814. 

opens first labour college in Canada, at 
Quebec, 20. 

regional council plans monthly consumer 
price index, 661. 

committee to re-draft C.C.C.L. constitu- 
tion appointment at annual conven- 
tion, 1468. 

Cardinal urges C.C.C.L. to assert its 
vitality, 518. 

chemical products unions set up new 
C.C.C.L. federation — National Federa- 
tion of Chemical Industry Workers, 
310. 

provisions of collective agreement between 
Dupuis Freres, Montreal department 
store, and National Syndicate of 
Trade Employees (C.C.C.L.), 1140. 

1953 wage demands studied by committee 
established by C.C.C.L., 363. 

Louiseville strike (Textile Workers' Syn- 
dicate), ends with contract unsigned, 
361. 

Canadian Association of Administrators of 
Labour Legislation: 

12th annual conference, 1520. 

Canadian Bar Association: 

proceedings of 35th annual convention, 

1426. 
T. and L.C. criticizes recommendations of 

C.B.A., 1426, 1616. 



INDEX 



XIX 



Canadian Broadcasting Corporation : 

Citizens' Forum schedules labour topics, 
1601. 

setting up of Polish section on interna- 
tional service requested by C.C.C.L., 
542; requests free broadcasting time 
for industrial workers, 542, 

R.T.B. re-affirms support of public owner- 
ship and government control of radio 
broadcasting and television, 547. 

resolution adopted by T. and L.C. re free 
radio and television time for labour 
organizations, 1291. 

Canadian Brotherhood of Railway Employees 
and Other Transport Workers: 

chairmen of regional committees of Joint 
Protective Board, C.B.R.E., appointed, 
1427; correction, 1619. 

Canadian Chamber of Commerce: 

presents brief to federal Cabinet, 228. 

Canadian Citizenship Act: 

amendments, 983. 

Canadian Congress of Labour: 

Dominion legislative program, 536; reply 

of Prime Minister, 538. 
Annual Conventions : 
thirteenth annual convention, 1434. 
Industrial Federation of Alberta, 1755. 
B.C. Federation of Labour, 1007. 
N.B. Council of Labour, 1755. 
Quebec Federation of Industrial Unions, 

1010. 

A. R. Mosher, President — New Year's 
message, 1760; Labour Day message, 
1128; remarks on employment of 
older workers, 211; on unity with 
T. and L.C, 515; remarks at con- 
vention of International Woodworkers 
of America, 1738; receives honorary 
Doctor of Law degree from St. 
Francis Xavier University, 993. 

J. C. Bury, former secretary of Vancouver 
labour council, joins I.C.F.T.U. staff, 
1595. 

appointment of organizer for western Nova 
Scotia, 1427. 

resignation of Jack Williams as Publicity 
Director, 992. 

formation of Quebec Federation of In- 
dustrial Unions (C.C. of L.), 17. 

numbers of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1951, by affiliation, 
1295. 

subsidies for coal mining industry sought 
by Maritime Marine Workers' Federa- 
tion, 1116. 



Canadian Congress of Labour — Con. 

proceedings of national policy conference 
of United Steelworkers of America 
(C.I.O. — C.C. of L.), 1457. 

establishment of defence fund "to protect 
the rights of Quebec workers to bar- 
gain collectively", 519. 

Brotherhood of Express Employees (C.C. 
of L.) merges with Brotherhood of 
Railway and Steamship Clerks . . . 
(A.F. of L. — T. and L.C), 516. 

election of George Burt, vice-president, to 
executive board of Inter-American 
Regional Organization of Workers 
(O.R.I.T.), part of I.C.F.T.U., 188. 

Director of Organization appointed, 372. 

establishment and functions of Inter- 
national Department, 371. 

Textile Workers' Union of America (C.C. 
of L. — C.I.O.) defeats A.F. of L. 
rival, United Textile Workers of 
America (A.F. of L. — T. and L.C.) 
in two Ontario plants, 369. 

20-point program of Political Action Com- 
mittee of C.C of L., 361. 

resolution favouring re-admission of ex- 
pelled unions, defeated at convention 
of C.C of L., 1442. 

joint statement (C.C. of L— T. and L.C.) 
on rehabilitation of disabled persons, 
522. 

C.C of L. — T. and L.C. unity unlikely— 
secretary-treasurer of T. and L.C, 660. 

conference proceedings of C.C. of L. and 
C.C.C.L. shipyard unions, 1458. 

second fair employment practices confer- 
ence held by Ontario Federation of 
Labour, 813. 

Canadian Construction Association: 

convention proceedings, 189. 

Canadian Federation of Agriculture: 

remarks of representative at Federal- Pro- 
vincial Farm Labour Conference, 46. 

Canadian Machinery and Industries Con- 
struction Limited: 

Company trains workers before it opens — 
apprentice training program in co- 
operation with Canadian Vocational 
Training Branch, federal Department 
of Labour, 368. 



INDEX 



Canadian Manufacturers' Association: 

82nd annual meeting, 996. 

greater emphasis on apprenticeship urged 

by J. D. Ferguson, President, 1423. 
warns industry to train personnel now to 

assure adequate supply of skilled 

labour, 816. 

Canadian National Railways: 

C.N.R. begins survey of its labour rela- 
tions, 517. 

activities of L.M.P.C. in Express Depart- 
ment, Montreal, 100. 

Canadian Pacific Railway : 

lack of skilled labour acute— apprentice- 
ship training urged by C.P.R. officer, 
1423. 

Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment 
No. 1: 

summary of recent decisions, 720, 1494, 
1790. 

Canadian Standards Association: 

publishes Safety Code for the Woodwork- 
ing Industry, 444. 

Safety Code for the Woodworking In- 
dustry adopted as regulations under 
Alberta Factories Act, 584. 

provisions of Safety Code for Passenger 
and Freight Elevators embodied under 
Industrial and Commercial Establish- 
ments Act and Public Building Safety 
Act, 1347. 

Canadian Vocational Training: 

See Vocational Training. 

Canadian Welfare Council: 

advocates added aid to employable jobless, 
in brief submitted to Cabinet, 517. 

Canadian Westinghouse Company: 

technical English taught immigrants who 
are qualified engineers and draftsmen, 
at Hamilton plant, 25. 

Canals : 

See Chignecto Canal. 

Canteens : 

United Kingdom — 

mid-century report of Chief Factory In- 
spector compares working conditions 
in factories in 1951 with those of 1901, 
1310. 



Carpenters and Joiners: 

B.C.— 

annual convention of United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners — proposal 
to seek 6-hour day, 30-hour week 
rejected; seeks "fringe" benefits, holi- 
day pay, etc., 23. 
Que.: refrigeration company must pay 
painters, carpenters rates set in con- 
struction trade decree, 1810. 
See also United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America. 

Cassidy Research Fund: 

Canada — 

establishment of Cassidy Research Pro- 
fessorship—fund for social work re- 
search established by University of 
Toronto, 995. 

Catering Industry: 

B.C.— 

application of Semi-monthiy Payment of 
Wages Act to hotel and catering in- 
dustry, 1344. 

Cauley, Jack, Vice-chairman, Ontario Work- 
men's Compensation Board: 
extracts from address at 68th convention 
of T. and L.C, 1287. 

Census: 

Canada — 
number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in Canadian industries 
in 1941 and 1951, as reported in D.B. 
of S. 1951 Census bulletin, 28. 
U.S.A.— 

one in every twelve persons aged over 65, 
according to Bureau of the Census, 30. 

Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation: 

summary of annual report (1952), 517. 
housing statistics, 1422. 

Certification : 

Canada — 

certification and other proceedings before 
the Canada Labour Relations Board— 
53, 237, 418, 574, 697, 872, 1020, 1154, 
1314, 1473, 1627, 1768. 

Supreme Court of Canada upholds setting 
aside by Ontario Court of certification 
order issued by provincial Labour 
Relations Board to Toronto News- 
paper Guild, 984. 

decision of Nova Scotia Supreme Court- 
that Labour Relations Board could 
not refuse to certify union because one 
of officers a Communist— upheld by 
Supreme Court of Canada, 984. 



INDEX 



Certification — Con . 

Canada — Con. 

Quebec Court decision that upheld de- 
certification of Montreal teachers' 
union for participation in illegal 
strike, rejected by Supreme Court of 
Canada, 984. 
provisions of labour code requested by 
C.C. of L., 537. 

N.S.: Rules of Procedure of Labour Rela- 
tions Board amended under Trade 
Union Act, 292; Supreme Court 
refuses employer permission to appeal 
to the Supreme Court of Canada in 
certification case, 111; decision of 
Supreme Court— that Labour Rela- 
tions Board could not refuse to certify 
union because one of officers a Com- 
munist — upheld by Supreme Court of 
Canada, 984. 

Ont.: regulations under Labour Relations 
Act amend Rules of Practice and 
Procedure of Labour Relations Board, 
292; Supreme Court of Canada up- 
holds setting aside by Ontario court 
of certification order issued by provin- 
cial Labour Relations Board to 
Toronto Newspaper Guild, 984; recom- 
mendations of Provincial Federation 
of Labour (T. and L.C.), 1008. 

P.E.I. : regulations under Trade Union Act 
re certification powers of Provincial 
Secretary, 292. 

Que.: Quebec court decision that upheld 
decertification of Montreal teachers' 
union for participation in illegal 
strike, rejected by Supreme Court of 
Canada, 984; Superior Court finds 
procedure of Labour Relations Board 
in certification hearing was unfair to 
employer, 286; U.E.'s claim for in- 
junction to prevent certification of 
rival union at R.C.A. Victor dismissed 
by Court of Queen's Bench, Appeal 
Side, 1338. 

Sask.: Court of Queen's Bench holds labour 
relations board had jurisdiction to 
certify union joint board as bargain- 
ing agent, 1339. 

U.S.A.— 

false non-communist oath voids certifica- 
tion — N.L.R.B. cancels union's bargain- 
ing rights. 1606. 
See also Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act; Legal Decisions. 

Chauffeurs : 

Que.— 

amendment to Motor Vehicles Act re 
licensing of chauffeurs and motor 
mechanics. 1043. 



Check-off: 

Canada — 

compulsory check-off of union dues pro- 
vided under terms of settlement 
reached in dispute between major 
railways and 17 non-operating railway 
unions, 19. 

provisions of collective agreements in 
manufacturing industries in effect in 
1952, 222. 

private member's Bill to amend I. R.D.I. 
Act, not passed, 1514. 

extracts from Hansard re, 31, 194, 377, 833, 
1745. 

revision of labour code requested by C.C. 
of L., 537. 

recommendation of Political Action Com- 
mittee of C.C. of L., 361. 

amendment to I.R.D.I. Act recommended 
by T. and L.C, 533. 
B.C.: provisions of first long-term contract 
in Jogging industry signed between 
I.W.A. and Western Plywoods (Cari- 
boo) Limited, 814. 
N.B.: provisions of first collective agree- 
ment between government department 
and I.B.E.W., 371. 
N.S.: amendments to Trade Union Act, 

1035, 1804. 
Que.: Court of Queen's Bench, Appeal Side 
. . . finds check-off a "condition of 
employment" coming within jurisdic- 
tion of arbitration board, 895. 
U.S.A.— 

union shop and check-off agreement signed 
between several railroads and 17 co- 
operating railway labour organizations 
in Eastern States, 19. 

Chemical Industry: 

Canada — 

expansion of plant facilities during 1948-53, 

1431. 
plant expansion and employment oppor- 
tunities in 1952, 16. 
number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in petroleum and coal products indus- 
try, 222. 

Ont.: effects of plant expansion on employ- 
ment (1948-53), 1006. 

Que.: chemical products unions set up new 
C.C.C.L. federation — National Federa- 
tion of Chemical Industry Workers, 
310. 

Chignecto Canal: 

immediate construction urged by C.C. of 
L., 1456. 



XXII 



INDEX 



Child Labour: 

text of Recommendation No. 96 — Con- 
cerning the Minimum Age for Admis- 
sion to Work Underground in Coal 
Mines, approved at 36th conference of 
I.L.O., 1148. 
legislation affecting women and children 
in industry discussed at convention of 
International Association of Govern- 
mental Labour Officials, 1045. 

Canada — 
report of Young Workers' Committee at 
convention of C.C.C.L., 1466. 

N.B.: employment of children in factories — 
administration of Factories Act in 
1952, 1012. 

Ont.: activities under Factory, Shop and 
Office Building Act in 1950-1951, 436. 

U.S.A.— 
passage of first factory law in New York 
state in 1884, 1606. 

Children of War Dead (Education Assist- 
ance) Act: 

provisions, 1510. 

Chrysler Corporation: 

U.S.A.— 

contract changes between U.A.W. and 
Chrysler Corporation, 809. 

Cigar Industry: 

Canada — 
wages and hours in tobacco, cigar and 
cigarette industry, 451. 

Cigarette Industry: 

Canada — 
wages and hours in tobacco, cigar and 
. cigarette industry, 451. 

Citation of Merit: 

Hon. Milton F. Gregg, Minister of Labour, 
receives Citation of Merit from In- 
ternational Association of Personnel 
in Employment Security, 990-91. 

Citizens' Forum: 

Canada — 
schedules labour topics, 1601. 

Citizenship : 

Canada — 
enactment of Immigration Act, amend- 
ments to Canadian Citizenship Act, 
983. 
language instruction for New Canadians — 
report of semi-annual conference of 
Vocational Training Advisory Council, 
398. 



Citizenship and Immigration. Department of: 

immigration statistics, 1259, 1426. 
See also Migration and Settlement. 

Civic Employees: 

Canada — 
wages, hours and working conditions of 

employees in municipal government 

service, 125-128. 
Que.: agreement reached between Montreal 

civic administration and employees 

(white-collar, policemen and firemen), 

1597. 

Civil Defence: 

Canada — 
recommendation of Canadian Chamber of 

Commerce, 1754. 
resolution adopted at convention of T. 

and L.C, 1291. 
B.C.: full benefits of provincial Workmen's 

Compensation Act extended to civil 

defence workers, lli5. 
Ont.: benefits of Workmen's Compensation 

Act applicable to civil defence 

workers, 29. 

Civil Engineering: 

4th session Of I.L.O. Building, Civil Engi- 
neering and Public Works Committee 
— studies guaranteed wages and in- 
creased productivity; other recom- 
mendations, 1764. 

Civil Rights: 

resolution adopted at I.L.O. 's Third Asian 
Regional Conference, 1624. 
B.C.: Bill not passed, 1041. 

Civil Service: 

Canada — 

provisions of Public Service Superannua- 
tion Act, 1511. 

claims for compensation under Govern- 
ment Employees Compensation Act 
(1952-53), 1130. 

compensable accidents among federal em- 
ployees—Minister of Labour urges 
government workers to avoid acci- 
dents, 571. 

extracts from Hansard re five-day week, 32. 

Staff Training Division to continue train- 
ing program for student draftsmen, 
368. 

recommendations of T. and L.C, 533. 
Alta.: resolution adopted at convention of 
Federation of Labour (T. and L.C), 
1007. 



INDEX 



XXJII 



Civil Service — Con. 
United Kingdom — 
request by National Whitley Council of 
the Civil Service, for equal pay for 
women, rejected, 24. 

Sweden — 
state committee of enquiry recommends 
equal pay for equal work in Civil 
Service, 1115. 

Civilian Labour Force: 

See Labour Force. 

Clerical Employees: 

Canada — ■ 
salaries of clerical employees in manu- 
facturing industries, 38. 

Closed Shop: 

Canada — 
provisions of agreements in manufacturing 
industries in 1952, 225. 

Closing of Shops: 

See Hours of Work; Shops. 

Clothing Industry: 

Canada — 
number of collective agreements and 
number of workers covered by agree- 
ments in clothing industry, 222. 
"generous" pension plan won by Winnipeg 
clothing factory workers (I.L.G.W.U.), 
21. 

Que.: Arbitration Board finds proposed 
agreement between clothing factory 
and union "one that the employer 
can properly sign" and criticizes firm 
for move to bar union, 518. 

U.S.A.— 
wage increases sought by Amalgamated 
Clothing Workers of America (C.I.O.). 
362. 

Co-determination : 

Germany — 
co-determination law analysed — analysis of 
recently enacted Shop Constitution 
Law of West German Federal Repub- 
lic which reintroduces provisions for 
protection of labour . . . 686. 

U.S.A.— 

co-determination in United States un- 
likely — report on situation in Germany 
by American researcher, 1739. 



Coal: 

text of Recommendation No. 96 — Con- 
cerning the Minimum Age for Admis- 
sion to Work Underground in Coal 
Mines, approved at 36th conference 
of I.L.O., 1148. 

Canada — 

output of coal per man day in under- 
ground mines in Canada (1952), 898. 

number of collective agreements and 
number of workers covered by agree- 
ments in petroleum and coal products 
industry, 222. 

subsidies for coal mining industry sought 
by Maritime Marine Workers' Federa- 
tion. 1116. 

recommendations of U.M.W. policy com- 
mittee, 1602. 

C.C. of L. urges appointment of labour 
representative to Dominion Coal 
Board, 538; recommends establish- 
ment of national fuel policy, 538; 
urges development of Canadian coal 
policy to provide full employment in 
coal mining industry, 1443-44. 

Alta.: regulations under Coal Mines Regu- 
lation Act re installation and use of 
diesel locomotives in coal mines, 1654 ; 
new* sections covering use of milli- 
second delay action detonators added 
to regulations under Coal Mines 
Regulations Act, 289. 

N.B.: resolution adopted by Council of 
Labour re Minto coal fields, 1756. 

N.S.: amendments to Coal Mines Regula- 
tion Act, 1804. 

United Kingdom — 
wage increase granted coal miners by 

State Coal Board, 363. 
fatalities in 1952, 1293. 

Japan — 
proposed labour law would curb coal and 
electrical strikes, 817. 

Poland- 
coal miners "members of the army", 1136. 
U.S.A.— 
amendments to Federal Coal Mine Safety 
Act, 1941 — government enforcement 
powers for prevention of major disas- 
ters in coal mines permit closing of 
unsafe mine, 101. 

Coastguards: 

Canada — 
institution of adequate coastguard urged 
bv T. and L. C, 1291. 



XXIV 



INDEX 



Collective Agreement Act (Quebec) : 

monthly summary of agreements under 
Act— 96, 281, 431, 580, 727, 884, 1030. 
1165, 1326, 1502, 1635, 1797. 

legal decisions re, 1808. 

Superior Court finds Collective Agreement 
Act doesn't authorize parity commit- 
tee to sue for damages, 1340. 

Court of the Sessions of the Peace, Terre- 
bonne . . . finds fair wage schedule, 
not Collective Agreement Act decree, 
applies to bridge builder, 1043. 

Collective Agreements : 

See Agreements. 

Collective Bargaining: 

Canada — 

guaranteed wage and employment plans 
in collective agreements, 1269 — in 
manufacturing industry, 1269, 1270; 
in non-manufacturing industries, 1269, 
1271. 

number of white-collar workers in manu- 
facturing industries. in collective 
bargaining units, 33. 

comptometer operators not "confidential" 
employees — decision of B.C. Labour 
Relations Board upheld by Supreme 
Court of Canada, in Safeway case, 984. 

decision of N.S. Supreme Court — that 
Labour Relations Board could not 
refuse to certify union because one of 
officers a Communist — upheld by 
Supreme Court of Canada, 984. 

Quebec court decision that upheld decerti- 
fication of Montreal teachers' union 
for participation in illegal strike, 
rejected by Supreme Court of Canada, 
984. 

Supreme Court of Canada upholds setting- 
aside by Ontario Court of certification 
order issued by provincial Labour 
Relations Board to Toronto News- 
paper Guild, 984. 

principles of guaranteed annual wage plan 
sought by I.U.E.W. (C.I.O.) in col- 
lective bargaining negotiations at con- 
vention in Montreal, 1598. 

guaranteed wages — discussion by employer- 
employee relations panel at meeting 
C.M.A., 996-1002. 

policy declaration of Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce, 228. 

compulsory arbitration rather than right 
to strike, sought by National Federa- 
tion of Public Employees, 1263. 

recommendations of T. and L.C.. 532-33. 



Collective Bargaining — Con. 

Alta.: new sections under Fire Departments 
Platoon Act provide for collective 
bargaining and compulsory arbitration 
of disputes, 1799; provisions of Police 
Act. 1800; concentrated drive by Oil- 
workers International Union to organ- 
ize oil workers, 1755; resolution 
adopted at convention of Federation 
of Labour (T. and L.C.) re Civil 
Service, 1007. 

B.C.: comptometer operators not "confiden- 
tial" employees — decision of Labour 
Relations Board upheld by Supreme 
Court of Canada, in Safeway case, 984; 
Court of Appeal holds Labour Rela- 
tions Board erred in finding compto- 
meter operators not confidential em- 
ployees, 284. 

N.S.: amended provisions of Nova Scotia 
Teachers' Union Act, 1805; decision of 
Supreme Court— that Labour Relations 
Board could not refuse to certify 
union because one of officers a Com- 
munist — upheld by Supreme Court of 
Canada, 984. 

Ont.: regulations under Labour Relations 
Act amend Rules of Practice and Pro- 
cedure of Labour Relations Board, 
292; Supreme Court of Canada up- 
holds setting aside by Ontario Court 
of certification order issued by provin- 
cial Labour Relations Board to 
Toronto Newspaper Guild, 984. 

P.E.I. : amended provisions of Trade Union 
Act, 1806; regulations under Trade 
Union Act re certification powers of 
Provincial Secretary, 292. 

Que.: number of petitions heard by Labour 
Relations Board as at March 31, 1952, 
310; Quebec court decision that up- 
held decertification of Montreal 
teachers' union for participation in 
illegal strike, rejected by Supreme 
Court of Canada, 984 ; establishment 
of defence fund "to protect the rights 
of Quebec workers to bargain col- 
lectively", 519. 

Sask.: amended provisions of Trade Union 

Act. 1648; Court of Queen's Bench 

holds labour relations board had 

jurisdiction to certify union joint 

• board as bargaining agent, 1339. 

India — 

Government proposals for changes in in- 
dustrial relations legislation studied 
by Indian Labour Conference, 739. 

Puerto Rico — 

re-organized company must carry out pen- 
sions provisions of collective agree- 
ment, 23. 



INDEX 



Collective Bargaining — Con. 
United Kingdom — 
resolution adopted by T.U.C. rejects . . . 
wage restraint which interferes with 
freedom of collective bargaining and 
independent arbitration, 1622. 

U.S.A.— 

six major railroads sign union shop agree- 
ments with non-operating rail unions 
187. 

collective bargaining effective wage-setter— 
recommendations of special commit- 
tee of Twentieth Century Fund, 1312. 

retirement income of $117.50 monthly- 
average benefit provided in collective 
bargaining pensions programs, 1266. 

joint action in wage negotiations and 
organizing campaigns by Amalgamated 
Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen 
(A.F. of L.) and United Packinghouse 
Workers (C.I.O.), 1119. 

collective bargaining under "Scanlon Plan" 
—case study into causes of industrial 
peace, issued by National Planning 
Association, 1138. 

causes of industrial peace — report of Na- 
tional Planning Association on study 
of textile plant, 1141. 

agreement signed between Goodyear Tire 
and Rubber Company and United 
Rubber Workers of America (C.I ) 
517. 

bases for Industrial Relations Act dis- 
cussed in address on current labour 
trends and labour problems, 407, 408. 

National Labour Relations Board — 

annual report of Board, 1159. 

rules that union certified as exclusive 
bargaining agent of employees can 
not charge non-members fee for pro- 
cessing grievances, 905. 

urges unions make long-term contracts as 
bar to representation vote, by decision 
of Board, 372. 

orders International Typographical Union 
to bargain in good faith, 995. 

false non-communist oath voids certifica- 
tion — Board cancels union's bargaining 
rights, 1606. 

Colleges : 

Canada — 
enrolment and expenditures during 1949- 

51, 1429. 
See also Universities. 



Colombo Plan : 

Canadian contribution to the Colombo 
Plan and United Nations Expanded 
Program of Technical Assistance, 402. 

technical assistance trainees in Canada 
under Colombo Plan and U.N. agen- 
cies, 1736. 

progress reviewed at 16-nation conference 
hold al New Delhi, India. 1603. 

report on Technical Co-operation Scheme 
of the Colombo Plan, 400. 

instructors for Colombo Plan — report of 
semi-annual conference of Vocational 
Training Advisory Council, 399. 

extracts from Hansard re, 525, 673. 

resolution adopted by Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce re underdeveloped coun- 
tries, 229. 

resolutions adopted at convention of C.C. 
of L., 1441. 

Commercial Establishments: 

See Industrial and Commercial Establish- 
ments. 

Communications : 

Canada — 

wage-rate changes in collective agreements, 
first 9 months, 1952, 218. 

number of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1946. 1950 and 1951, 
1294, 1299. 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in communications in 
1941 and 1951 as reported in D.B. of 
S. 1951 Census bulletin, 28. 

public ownership of all telephone com- 
panies urged by T. and L.C.. 1291. 

U.S.A.— 

wage increases sought by textile workers in 
1953, 362. 

jurisdiction over radio and electronic com- 
munications on certain ships won by 
American Radio Association (C.I.O.), 
1607. 

Communism : 

condemnation by International Wood- 
workers of America at annual conven- 
tion. 1738. 

Canada — 
resolution adopted at convent ion of 

C.C.C.L., 1467. 
suspension of United Fishermen and Allied 

Workers' Union of British Columbia 

by T. and L.C., 1257. 
resolution adopted at convention of T. 

and L.C.. 1275. 



INDEX 



Communism— Co n. 

B.C.: local of United Fishermen and Allied 
Workers' Union, T. and L.C., secedes, 
and affiliates with Pacific Fishermen 
and Allied Trades Union, S.I.U., Cana- 
dian district, 1425; suspension of 
United Fishermen and Allied Workers' 
Union of British Columbia by T. and 
L.C., 1257. 

Israel — 

Communist Party banned from Histadrut 
(General Federation of Labour), 521. 

Italy- 
two democratic labour groups sign agree- 
ment to collaborate against com- 
munism, 521. 

U.S.A.— 

investigation of Communist influence in 
labour unions by special task force, 
1258. 

perjury charges against Harry Bridges, 
President, I.L.A., thrown out by 
Supreme Court — citizenship restored, 
993. 

legislation to bar Communists from trade 
unions recommended by Senate sub- 
committee investigating internal secur- 
ity, 522. 

false non-communist oath voids certifica- 
tion — N.L.R.B. cancels union's bargain- 
ing rights, 1606. 

N.L.R.B. steps up enforcement of non- 
communist provision of Taft-Hartley 
Act, 31. 

Company Unions: 

Canada — 
provisions of labour code requested by 
C.C. of L., 537. 

Compensation : 

Canada — 

amended provisions of Merchant Seamen 
Compensation Act, 1509. 

extract from Hansard re Merchant Seamen 
Compensation Act, 32. 

See also Civil Service; Seamen; Work- 
men's Compensation. 

Compulsory Arbitration : 

Canada — 
compulsory arbitration rather than right 
to strike, sought by National Federa- 
tion of Public Emploj'ees, 1263. 
See also Arbitration. 

Compulsory Military Service: 

See Military Service. 



Compulsory Unionism: 

See Trade Unions. 

Conciliation : 

role of states and provinces in settling 
labour disputes, discussed at conven- 
tion of International Association of 
Governmental Labour Officials, 1045. 
Canada — 

conciliation and other proceedings before 
the Minister of Labour— 54, 239, 419, 
574, 697, 873. 1020, 1155, 1314, 1475, 
1628, 1770. 

Alta.: legislation enacted in 1953. 1036. 

B.C.: judgment requiring municipal board 
to carry out conciliation board's 
recommendation confirmed by Court of 
Appeal, 1338; criticism of Industrial 
Conciliation and Arbitration Act by 
B.C. Trade Union Congress (T. and 
L.C.), 1616; Supreme Court . . . 
issues order requiring police commis- 
sioners to carry out conciliation 
board's recommendations, 733. 

N.B.: activities under Labour Relations Act 
in 1952. 1011; resolution adopted by 
N.B. Federation of Labour re board 
reports, 1615. 

X.S.: amended provisions of Nova Scotia 
Teachers' Union Act, 1805. 

Ont.: activities of Conciliation Service in 
1950-51, 437; recommendations of 
Provincial Federation of Labour (T. 
and L.C.), 1008. 

Que.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1035. 

Sask.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1036; 
activities of Labour Relations Branch, 
Department of Labour, in 1951, 690. 

India — 

Government proposals for changes in in- 
dustrial relations legislation studied 
by Indian Labour Conference, 739. 
See also Agreements; Arbitration; Indus- 
trial Disputes; Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act; 
Strikes and Lockouts. 

Conditions of Employment: 

See Employment Conditions. 

Congress of Industrial Organizations: 

Walter P. Reuther elected president, 21. 

address of Walter Reuther, president, at 
convention of Canadian Congress of 
Labour, 1447. 

President Walter Reuther receives honor- 
ary Doctor of Law degree from St. 
Francis Xavier University, 993. 



INDEX 



XXVII 



Congress of Industrial Organizations — Con. 

appointment of John V. Riffe as Executive 
Vice-president, 521. 

death of Allan S. Haywood, executive 
Vice-president, 366. 

trade union membership, 404, 817. 

number of members of C.I.O. textile 
unions transferred to A.F. of L. United 
Textile Workers of America, 24. 

numbers of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1951, by affiliation, 1295. 

may re-admit unions once Communist- 
led, 663. 

appointment of David J. McDonald, as 
president of United Steelworkers of 
America (C.I.O.) , 29. 

C.I.O. and A.F. of L. set up group to end 
"raiding", at meeting of committee to 
discuss labour unity, 660. 

C.I.O. — A.F. of L. leaders sign no-raiding 
pact, 990, 1424. 

"no-raiding" pact signed by International 
Association of Machinists (A.F. of L.) 
and United Rubber Workers (C.I.O.), 
1259. 

Textile Workers' Union of America (C.C. 
of L. — C.I.O.) defeats A.F. of L. 
rival, United Textile Workers of 
America (A.F. of L. — T. and L.C.) 
in two Ontario plants, 369. 

locals of United Brewery Workers of 
America (C.I.O.) join brewery division 
of International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters (A.F. of L.), 1120. 

joint action in wage negotiations and 
organizing campaigns by United Pack- 
inghouse Workers (C.I.O.) and Amal- 
gamated Meat Cutters and Butcher 
Workmen (A.F. of L), 1119. 

re-organization of staff and reduction of 
regional officers, 989. 

representation elections during 1952 — 
annual report of N.L.R.B., 1159. 

approves merger of white-collar unions, 
815. 

major unions seek wage increases in 1953, 
362. 



Consumer Price Index — Con. 
U.S.A.— 

solutions re problem of converting escala- 
tor agreements to new consumer price 
index, 809. 

contract changes between U.A.W. and 
Chrysler Corporation, 809. 

statistics, 913. 

See also Prices. 

Contracts: 

N.B.— 

provisions of Fair Wages and Hours of 
Labour Act, 1037. 
U.S.A.— 

establishment and membership of Govern- 
ment Contracts Committee appointed 
to prevent discrimination in employ- 
ment by companies holding federal 
government contracts, 1261, 1427. 

See also Agreements; Fair Wages. 

Conventions : 

See Trade Unions; various subject head- 



Co-operative Credit Associations: 

extracts from Hansard re, 673, 817. 

Co-operative Credit Associations Act: 

provisions, 1513. 

Co-operative Credit Societies: 

Nfld.— 
resolution adopted at convention of New- 
foundland Federation of Labour (T. 
and L.C), 1263. 

Co-operative Societies : 

Canada — 
annual report on co-operatives prepared 
by Department of Agriculture, 1604. 

Que.: retroactive pay deposited in caisses 
populaires by members of Arvida 
Aluminium Syndicate (C.C.C.L.), 1604. 



Construction : 

See Building and Construction. 

Consumer Price Index: 

Canada — 
cost-of-living index discontinued — replaced 

by consumer price index, 1533. 
conversion of escalator clauses in wage 
contracts from use of cost-of-living 
index to consumer price index, 1533. 
Que.: C.C.C.L. regional council plans 
monthly regional consumer price 
index, 661. 



Co-operative Union of Canada: 

44th annual congress, 664. 

Corporations : 

Que — 
legislation enacted in 1953, 1035; revised 
regulations under municipal and 
school corporations Act, 1042. 

Correspondence Courses: 

Canada — 
vocational correspondence courses — 397, 
1751, 1752. 



XXVIII 



INDEX 



Corrupt Practices: 

See Communism; Racketeering; Subver- 
sive Activities. 

Cost of Living: 

Canada — 

monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics— 5, 176, 350, 504, 656, 808, 982, 
1114, 1256, 1420, 1594, 1730. 

cost-of-living index discontinued — replaced 
by consumer price index, 1533. 

conversion of escalator clauses in wage 
contracts from use of cost-of-living 
index to consumer price index, 1533. 

cost-of-living bonus or wage adjustments 
in manufacturing industry (in 1949, 
1950, 1951 and 1953), 1530. 

office workers in manufacturing reporting 
cost-of-living wage adjustment (1949- 
53), 1666, 1667. 

recommendation of Political Action Com- 
mittee of C.C. of L., 361. 

U.S.A.— 

solutions re problem of converting escala- 
tor agreements to new consumer price 
index, 809. 

revision of U.A.W.'s escalator contract 
accepted by General Motors Corpora- 
tion and Ford Motor Company, 809. 

Cotterill, Murray, United Steelworkers of 
America: 
appointment as personal representative 
in Western Canada of C. H. Millard, 
Canadian Director, U.S.W.A., 992. 

Cotton Industry: 

United Kingdom — 
Industrial Disputes Tribunal rejects claim 
for wage increase for cotton workers, 
363. 

Cotton Products: 

Canada — 

imports of cotton products during August 
1952 and 1953, 1734. 



Credit Societies: 

Canada — 
provisions of Co-operative Credit Associa- 
tions Act, 1513. 

Credit Unions: 

Man.— 
amendment to Credit Union Act, 1335. 

Que.: retroactive pay deposited in caisses 
populaires by members of Arvida 
Aluminium Syndicate (C.C.C.L.), 1604. 

Criminal Code: 

Canada — 

recommendations of C.C.C.L. re re-draft- 
ing of Code, 541. 

proposed amendments opposed by C.C. 
of L., 1456; requests revision of Code, 
537. 

recommendations of R.T.B., 545. 

recommendations of T. and L.C., 533, 1278. 

Cuba: 

ratification of I.L.O. Conventions govern- 
ing weekly rest in industry, forced 
labour, holidays with pay, minimum 
age for employment at sea, hours of 
work and rest periods and final articles 
revision, 1625. 

Current Labour Market: 

See Labour Market. 

Current Labour Statistics: 

See Labour Statistics. 

Current Labour Trends: 

U.S.A.— 

economist assesses current labour trends 
and labour problems — unions' role in 
the economy, philosophy and policies 
discussed in address by Prof. Sumner 
H. Slichter, of Harvard, 404. 

Cushing, Gordon, Secretary-Treasurer, Trades 
and Labour Congress of Canada: 
T. and L.C. — C.C. of L. unity unlikely, 
660. 



Crafts : 

See Arts and Crafts. 

Crawford, A. W., Director of Training, Federal 
Department of Labour: 
report to Apprenticeship Training Advisory 
Committee at 3rd meeting, 865. 

Credit Associations : 

See Co-operative Credit Associations. 



Customs : 

Canada — 
definition of "dumping" in Customs Act 
may require revision, 1603. 

Czechoslovakia : 

enactment of new forced labour laws, 1136. 

report that rights of trade unions violated 
in Czechoslovakia adopted at 122nd 
session of I.L.O. Governing Body, 1151. 



INDEX 



Daylight Saving: 

Canada — 
recommendation of Canadian Chamber of 
Commerce, 1754. 

Deaf Persons: 

Canada- 
enrolment in schools for deaf and blind 
persons in 1950-51, 1429. 

Deakin, Arthur, British Trades Union Con- 
gress : 
extracts from address as fraternal delegate 
of T.U.C. to convention of T. and 
L.C., 1286. 

Decentralization of Industry: 

Canada — 
resolution adopted by Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce, 230. 

Defence Industries: 

Canada — 

C.V.T. training of workers for defence 
industries, 397, 1751. 

Defence Production : 

See National Defence; Production. 

Defence Training: 

Canada — 
defence training program — report of semi- 
annual conference of Vocational 
Training Advisory Council, 398. 

Defence Workers: 

Canada — 

amended provisions of National Housing 
Act, 1511-12. 

Deferments : 

See Military Deferments. 

Department of Citizenship and Immigration: 

See Migration and Settlement. 

Department of Labour: 

See Labour Departments and Bureaus. 

Department of Veterans' Affairs Act: 

inclusion of disabled veterans employed in 
Federal Government sheltered work- 
shops under Government Employees 
Compensation Act — revision of Vet- 
craft Shops Regulations, 1180. 

new order under Act re workmen's com- 
pensation benefits, 442. 

Department Stores: 

Canada — 
provisions of collective agreement between 
Dupuis Freres, Montreal, and Na- 
tional Syndicate of Trade Employees 
(C.C.C.L.), 1140. 



Depression: 

Que.— 

economic regression predicted by Pro- 
fessional Association of Industrialists 
at convention of Quebec employers' 
organization, 1599. 
U.S.A.— 
inflation or depression? — review of econo- 
mic situation by economic advisers, 
1120. 

Disabled Persons: 

See Handicapped Persons. 

Disabled Persons (Employment) Act, 1944: 

United Kingdom — 

Remploy Limited, company established 
under provisions of Act, 1748. 

Disabled Veterans: 

See Handicapped Persons; Veterans. 

Discrimination : 

Canada — 

provisions of Canada Fair Employment 
Practices Act, 1508. 

extracts from Hansard re Fair Employ- 
ment Practices Bill, 667. 

provisions of collective agreements in 
manufacturing industries in effect in 
1952, 222 . 

report of National Committee on Human 
Rights at annual convention of C.C. 
of L, 1451-52. 

T. and L.C. commends introduction of 
Fair Employment Practices Act, 534; 
requests outlawing of restrictive cove- 
nants in land and property contracts, 
534. 
Man.: provisions of Fair Employment 

Practices Act, 1036, 1330. 
Ont.: second fair emplojnment practices con- 
ference held by Ontario Federation of 
Labour (C.C. of L.), 813; discrimina- 
tion against workers for union activity 
condemned at convention of Provin- 
cial Federation of Labour (T. and 
L.C), 1008. 
U.S.A.— 

anti-discrimination bill introduced in 
Senate, 813. 

establishment and membership of Govern- 
ment Contracts Committee appointed 
to prevent discrimination in employ- 
ment by companies holding federal 
government contracts, 1261, 1427. 

legislation enacted in Alaska and Kansas 
during 1953, 1430. 

anti-discrimination measures in New York 
state adopted in 1942 and 1945, 1606. 



INDEX 



Discrimination — Con. 

U.S.A.— Con. 

review of anti-discrimination law — Ives- 
Quinn Law — of New York state, 29. 

New York Supreme Court upholds judg- 
ment requiring compliance with order 
of state's commission against discrimi- 
nation, 1517. 

Diseases, Industrial: 

Canada — 

new regulations under Government Em- 
ployees' Compensation Act, 114. 

facilities for prevention or treatment of 
industrial diseases in manufacturing 
establishments, 569. 

B.C.: recommendations of Chief Justice 
Sloan re coverage of occupational 
diseases under Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Act, 556; report of Chief Justice 
Sloan on administration of Workmen's 
Compensation Act — submissions of 
I.U.M.M.S.W. re Trail smelter, etc., 
685; workers in prison hospital unit 
eligible for compensation for tuber- 
culosis under amended schedule of 
Workmen's Compensation Act, 1181; 
traumatic deafness included as indus- 
trial disease under Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act, 591. 

Que.: new regulation under Workmen's 
Compensation Act declares "tenosyno- 
vitis" an industrial disease, 1519. 

Sask.: new provisions of Mines Regulations 
Act, 1187. 

N.W.T.: revised regulations under Work- 
men's Compensation Ordinance, 888. 

United Kingdom — 

mid-century report of Chief Factory In- 
spector compares working conditions 
in factories in 1951 with those of 
1901, 1309. 

Dismissals: 

Man- 
Court of Appeal finds one hour adequate 
notice of dismissal for painter paid by 
week at hourly rate, 897. 

Distributive, Processing and Office Workers 
of America: 

U.S.A.— 
C.I.O. approves merger with Retail, Whole- 
sale and Department Store Union 
(C.I.O.), 815. 



Dock Workers: 

U.S.A.— 

racketeering on New York city waterfront 
curbed by legislation enacted by 
states of New York and New Jersey, 
1143. 

Domestic Workers: 

B.C.— 

recommendations of Chief Justice Sloan re 
coverage of domestic servants under 
Workmen's Compensation Act, 554. 
Sask.: Masters and Servants Act replaced 
by Wages Recovery Act, 691. 

Dominion Bureau of Statistics: 

See Statistics, Dominion Bureau of. 

Dominion Coal Board: 

C.C. of L. urges appointment of labour 
representative, 538. 

Dominion Joint Legislative Committee of 
Railway Transportation Brother- 
hoods: 

See Railway Transportation Brotherhoods. 

Draftsmen: 

Canada — 
Government to continue training program 
for student draftsmen, 368. 

Drilling : 

B.C.— 

Supreme Court finds that collective agree- 
ment entitled machinists' union to 
perform certain drilling, 1516. 

"Dumping": 

Canada — 

definition of "dumping" in Customs Act 
may require revision, 1603. 

recommendations of C.I.O. Textile Work- 
ers in brief presented to Federal 
Cabinet, 1734. 

Durkin, Martin P., United States Secretary 
of Labour: 
re-organizes Department of Labour, 1266. 
urges youth to finish schooling, 1262. 
resignation, 1257. 

Early Closing: 

See Hours of Work; Shops. 

Earnings : 

Canada — 
monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics— 5, 176, 350, 504, 656, 808, 982, 
1114, 1256, 1420, 1594, 1730. 
See also Salaries; Wages. 



INDEX 



XXXI 



Economic Aid: 

technical aid answer to "discontent" — 
statement by Hugh Keenleyside, 
Director-General of U.N. Technical 
Assistance Administration, 27. 

Economic Situation: 

Que.— 

economic regression predicted by Pro- 
fessional Association of Industrialists 
at convention of Quebec employers' 
organization, 1599. 
U.S.A.-- 

inflation or depression? — review of econo- 
mic situation by economic advisers, 
1120. 

new era of prosperity forecast, 1739. 

Edelman, John W., Assistant Secretary of 
Labour of the United States: 
nomination, 362. 

Education: 

Canada — 

provisions of Children of War Dead (Edu- 
cation Assistance) Act, 1510. 

major needs in educational research, 1430. 

D.B. of S. report on expenditures on 
formal education in Canada in 1950, 
1429. 

enrolment in schools, colleges, public 
secondary schools, evening classes, 
provincial correspondence courses and 
schools for blind and deaf persons, 
during 1949-51, 1429. 

increase in college and high school attend- 
ance since 1921, 520. 

placement of 1953 university graduates, 
1261. 

extracts from Hansard re education of 
immigrants, 524. 

report of Director of Education Service 
at convention of C.C.C.L., 1465. 

recommendations of C.C. of L., 361, 538. 

R.T.B. commends government assistance 
to universities, 547. 

federal aid for education requested by 
T. and L.C., 535. 
Alta.: Students Assistance Act provides 
financial assistance to university stu- 
dents, teachers in training and student 
nurses, 1801. 
N.S.: regulations under Education Act, 1805; 
amended provisions of Nova Scotia 
Teachers' Union Act, 1805. 
Ont.: plan permits students half day at 
work, half at school, 368; one year in 
five as industrial workers recom- 
mended for vocational school teachers, 
816. 



Education — Con. 

Sask.: amendment to Teacher Tenure Act, 
1651 ; scholarships awarded by Regina 
Trades and Labour Council, 662. 
United Kingdom — 
50th anniversary of Workers' Educational 
Association, 1470. 
India — 
unemployment among educated class re- 
lieved by opening of primary schools, 
1456. 
U.S.A.— 
Secretary of Labour urges youth to finish 

schooling, 1262. 
recommendations of National Manpower 
Council in report presented to Presi- 
dent Eisenhower, 986. 
See also Teachers; Workers' Education. 

Elections: 

resolution adopted at I.L.O.'s Third Asian 
Regional Conference, 1624. 
Canada — 

amendment to Dominion Elections Act 
requested by Canadian Chamber of 
Commerce, 229. 

amendments to Dominion Elections Act 
urged by C.C. of L., 1455; recom- 
mendations re federal election proce- 
dures, 1455. 
Que.: amendments to Cities and Towns 

Act, 1042. 
U.S.A.— 

representation elections during 1952 — 
annual report of N.L.R.B., 1159. 

unions urged to make long-term contracts 
as bar to representation vote, by 
decision of N.L.R.B., 372. 

procedures for supervised union representa- 
tion elections . . . investigation of 
complaints, established in North 
Dakota and Oregon, 1430. 

Electrical Apparatus : 

Canada — 

expansion of plant facilities for manu- 
facture of electrical apparatus during 
1948-53, 1432. 

plant expansion and employment oppor- 
tunities in 1952, 15-16. 

number of collective agreements and 
number of workers covered by agree- 
ments in electrical apparatus and sup- 
plies industry, 222. 
Ont.: effects of plant expansion on employ- 
ment (1948-53), 1006. 

Electrical Energy: 

B.C.— 

regulations under British Columbia Elec- 
trical Energy Inspection Act, 1181. 



XXXII 



INDEX 



Electrical Installations : 

Sask.— 
activities of Electrical Inspection and 
Licensing Branch, Department of 
Labour, in 1951, 692. 

Electrical Workers: 

See International Brotherhoods . . . 

Electricians : 

N.B.— 

new section in Electrical Energy Act 
(1931), re licensing of electricians, 
1639; administration of Trades Exa- 
mination Act during 1952, 1013. 

Electricity : 

Canada — 
number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in electricity industry 
in 1941 and 1951 as reported in D.B. 
of S. 1951 Census bulletin. 28. 
Japan — 

proposed labour law would curb electrical 
and coal strikes, 817 . 

Electronics: 

U.S.A.— 

jurisdiction over radio and electronic com- 
munications on certain ships won by 
American Radio Association (C.I.O.), 
1607. 

Elevators: 

Alta.— 
regulations under Factories Act governing 
construction, operation ... in grain 
elevators, 586. 

Ont.: provisions of Elevators and Lifts Act, 
1641; legislation enacted in 1953, 1038. 

Que.: provisions of Canadian Standards 
Association Safety Code for Passenger 
and Freight Elevators embodied 
under Industrial and Commercial 
Establishments Act and Public Build- 
ing Safety Act, 1347. 

Sask.: activities of Boilers, Factories and 
Elevators Branch, Department of 
Labour (1951), 692. 
See also Grain Elevators. 

Emergency Powers Act: 

amended provisions. 1512. 

Emigration : 

Canada — 

emigration and immigration in 1952 — 

extracts from Hansard, 665. 
See also Migration and Settlement. 



Employees' Compensation : 

See Government Employees' Compensa- 
tion. 

Employer-Employee Relations : 

See Industrial Relations; Labour-Manage- 
ment Co-operation. 

Employers' Organizations : 

Que.— 

economic regression predicted by Profes- 
sional Association of Industrialists at 
convention of Quebec employers' 
organization, 1599; eighth local estab- 
lished at St. Jerome, 994. 

Employment : 

statement of I.L.O. views on full employ- 
ment policy approved at 122nd session 
of I.L.O. Governing Body, 1151. 

I.L.O. studies problems of women textile 
workers, 235. 

text of Recommendation Xo. 96 — Con- 
cerning the Minimum Age for Admis- 
sion to Work Underground in Coal 
Mines, approved at 36th Conference 
of I.L.O., 1148. 

text of Recommendation Xo. 97 — Con- 
cerning the Protection of the Health 
of Workers in Places of Employment, 
approved at 36th Conference of I.L.O., 
1149. 

Belgium ratifies I.L.O. convention con- 
cerning migration for employment. 
1625. 

Cuba ratines I.L.O. convention governing 
minimum age for employment at sea. 
1625. 

Canada — 

current labour market — monthly report on 
labour force survey conducted by 
D.B. of S, 1. 171. 345. 499. 641. 793, 
967, 1099, 1241, 1405, 1579, 1715. 

monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics, 5, 176, 350. 504. 656, 808, 982, 
1114. 1256. 1420. 1594, 1730. 

industrial employment, payrolls and aver- 
age weekly wages and salaries, Sep- 
tember 1. 1953. as reported by D.B. of 
S., 1731. ' 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in Canadian industries 
in 1941 and 1951, as reported in D.B. 
of S. 1951 Census bulletin. 28. 

slight emphrvment drop recorded at Nov- 
ember 1, 1952, 18. 

placements made by X'.E.S. in 1952, 366. 

number of married women in labour force 
during period 1941-1951, 662. 

extracts from Hansard re employment age 
limit, 32. 



INDEX 



XXXIII 



Employment — Con. 

extracts from Hansard re fair employment 
practices, 31. 

effects of plant expansion on employment 
in Canada, 1948-53, 1431. 

guaranteed employment and wage plans 
in collective agreements, 1269 — in 
manufacturing industry, 1269, 1270; in 
non-manufacturing industries, 1269, 
1271. 

expansion in petroleum products industry 
creates new employment, 372. 

industrial expansion, 1948-1952, in trans- 
portation equipment industry, 513. 

placement of handicapped persons in first 
eight months of 1953, by Special 
Placements Division, N.E.S., 1424. 

T. and L.C. and C.C. of L. support rehabi- 
litation of disabled persons, 522. 

shortage of trained young women workers 
forces industry to hire older women, 
812. 

usefulness of workers based on skill, not 
age, 188. 

1953 employment prospects for university 
graduates and undergraduates, 520. 

employment opportunities of technical 
personnel and university graduates, 
661. 

resolution adopted by Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce re employment of physi- 
cally-handicapped, 230. 

development of Canadian coal policy to 
provide full employment in coal min- 
ing industry, urged by C.C. of L., 
1443-44. 

"spread-the-work" policy sought by 
I.U.M.M.S.W. at annual convention, 
660. 
JsLS.: provisions of Nova Scotia Labour 
Act re employment of non-residents, 
1804. 
Ont.: effects of plant expansion on employ- 
ment in Ontario, 1948-53, 1004. 
Que.: survey of working conditions of 
young workers, made by Jeunesse 
Ouvriere Catholique, 230, 294. 
N.W.T.: revised regulations under Mining 

Safety Ordinance, 889. 
New Zealand — 

increase in labour force and population, 
1607. 
United Kingdom — 

seasonal decline in employment during 
September, 1953, 1732. 

annual report of Ministry of Labour and 
National Service (1951), 675. 

labour mobility encouraged by full em- 
ployment, 1329. 

94375—3 



Employment— Con. 

United Kingdom — Con. 

Remploy Limited, company established 

under provisions of Disabled Persons 

(Employment) Act, 1944, to provide 

work for disabled, 1748. 

Belgium — 

Belgium ratines I.L.O. convention con- 
cerning migration for employment, 
1625. 
Cuba — 
Cuba ratifies I.L.O. convention governing 
minimum age for employment at sea, 
1625. 

U.S.A.— 

employment improves in major labour 
markets, 30. 

employment situation during July-August, 
1953, 1732. 

number of women gainfully employed, 
662. 

number of women in paid employment 
quadrupled in 60 years, 1425. 

House of School and Industry aids older 
women to rejoin labour force, 1600. 

shortage of young women workers, 812. 

increase in demand for older workers, 817. 

number of railroad workers 65 years of age 
and over in 1951, 994. 

opportunity for continued work by able- 
bodied aged persons, recommended, 
188. 

few firms develop definite policies for 
utilizing older workers survey by 
American Management Association 
reveals, 1117. 

retirement ages may be extended — N.Y. 
Times, 189. 

provision in New York — New Jersey 
waterfront hiring law requiring regis- 
tration of all longshoremen . . . piers, 
upheld by federal court, 1740. 

annual increase in buying power of work- 
ers' wages forecast in study Employ- 
ment and Wages in the United States, 
by Twentieth Century Fund, 1429. 

establishment of Government Contracts 
Committee to prevent discrimination 
in employment, 1261. 

review of anti-discrimination law — Ives- 
Quinn Law— of New York State, 29. 

number of disabled persons restored to 
useful employment, 1039. 

See also Fair Employment Practices; Re- 
habilitation. 



XXXIV 



INDEX 



Employment Conditions : 

functions of a National Labour Depart- 
ment denned in report of special com- 
mittee of I.L.O., 1471. 

text of Recommendation No. 97 — Concern- 
ing the Protection of the Health of 
Workers in Places of Employment, 
approved at 36th Conference of I.L.O., 
1149. 

resolutions adopted at meeting (fourth 
session) of I.L.O. Petroleum Indus- 
trial Committee, 234. 

Canada — 

Wages, hours and working conditions in 
certain industries — 
meat products, 597. 

municipal government service — fire- 
fighters, police constables, and civic 
labourers, 125, 128. 
pulp and paper, 748. 
tobacco, cigar and cigarette industry, 
451. 
office employees' working conditions in 

manufacturing (1949-53), 1665. 
plant employees' working conditions in 
Canadian manufacturing industry in 
1949, 1950, 1951 and 1953, 1529. 
standard work week (including 40-hour 
week and five-day week) in manufac- 
turing industries, 1952 — plant emploj^- 
ees, 838; office employees, 843. 
accident prevention facilities in manufac- 
turing establishments — Department of 
Labour's annual survey of working 
conditions as at October 1, 1951, 569. 
conference on uniformity of job accident 

statistics, 516. 
C.N.R. begins survey of its labour rela- 
tions, 517. 
Man.: re amendments to Hours and Con- 
ditions of Work Act re payment of 
overtime, 1038, 1333, 1335. 
N.B.: resolution adopted by Council of 

Labour re Minto coal fields, 1756. 
Que.: survey of working conditions of young 
workers made by Jeunesse Ouvriere 
Catholique, 230, 294; injunction pro- 
hibiting textile firm from changing 
work conditions while negotiating dis- 
solved by Court of Queen's Bench, 
Appeal side, 108. 

United Kingdom — 
mid-century report of Chief Factory In- 
spector compares working conditions 
in factories in 1951 with those of 1901, 
1304. 
establishment of committees to study 
human problems in industry, 816. 
Japan — 
Review of Labour Conditions in Japan, 



Employment Conditions — Con. 

U.S.A.— 

working conditions of office workers in 
manufacturing industries, 39. 

commission set up in New York state in 
1895 to study working conditions of 
women and children, 1606. 

Employment of Children: 

See Child Labour; Child Welfare; Juve- 
nile Employment. 

Employment Service: 

Canada — 

N.F.B. film— Everybody's Handicapped — 
prepared by N.E.S., Department of 
Labour, and National Advisory Coun- 
cil for Rehabilitation of the Disabled, 
1595. 

monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics, 5, 176, 350, 504, 656, 808, 982, 
1114, 1256, 1420, 1597, 1730. 

Hon. Milton F. Gregg, Minister of Labour, 
receives Citation of Merit from Inter- 
national Association of Personnel in 
Employment Security, 990-91. 

placements made by N.E.S. in 1952, 366. 

placement of handicapped persons in first 
eight months of 1953, by Special 
Placements Division, N.E.S., 1424. 

report on special placements given at 
meeting of National Advisory Com- 
mittee on the Rehabilitation of Dis- 
abled Persons, 1747. 

job counselling for older workers — address 
of Dr. W. G. Scott, adviser to N.E.S., 
1137. 

recruitment of workers from Maritime 
and Prairie Provinces to aid in gen- 
eral farm work, haymaking and har- 
vesting in Ontario, 992. 

annual report of U.I.C. for fiscal year 
ended March 31, 1952, 191. 

increased registrations at universities indi- 
cate shortage of engineers may be 
relieved in few years — report of 
Executive and Professional Division, 
N.E.S, 520. 
U.S.A.— 

establishment of Public Employment Ser- 
vice in New York state in 1896, 1606. 

Engine Operators: 

N.S.— 
amendments to Engine Operators Act, 
1039, 1804. 

Engineering : 

4th session of I.L.O. Building, Civil Engi- 
neering and Public Works Committee 
— studies guaranteed wages and in- 
creased productivity; other recom- 
mendations, 1764. 



INDEX 



XXXV 



Engineering Institute of Canada: 

extracts from address of Dr. 0. J. Fire- 
stone, Economic Adviser, Department 
of Trade and Commerce, 28. 

Engineers : 

Canada — 

increased registrations at universities in- 
dicate shortage of engineers may be 
relieved \n few years, 520. 

technical English taught immigrants who 
are qualified engineers and draftsmen 
at Hamilton plant of Canadian West- 
inghouse Company, 25. 
Ont.: enactment of Operating Engineers Act, 
1039 ; activities of Board of Examiners 
of Operating Engineers in 1950-51, 
436; High Court of Justice finds 
Arbitration Act applicable to clause 
in agreement between engineers and 
City of Hamilton, 441. 

See also Engine Operators; Operating 
Engineers; Stationary Engineers. 

English Language: 

See Languages. 

Equal Pay: 

provisions of I.L.O. Convention No. 100 
concerning equal pay for men and 
women for work of equal value, 1018. 

report of subcommittee, on problems of 
women's employment in the textile 
industry — fourth session of I.L.O. Tex- 
tiles Industrial Committee, 694. 
.Canada — 

private member's Bill, Women's Equal Pay 
Act, not passed, 1514. 

extracts from Hansard re equal pay for 
equal work for women, 524, 1745. 

arguments for equal pay for women pre- 
sented in study by official of Laval 
Centre for Adult Education, 1265. 

Canadian rubber workers seek equal pay 
to United States . . . 659. 

recommendation of C.C. of L., 538. 

resolution adopted at convention of 
T. and L.C., 1291. 
B.C.: equal pay bill forecast in Speech from 
the Throne, 1422; enactment of legis- 
lation, 1735; Bill not passed, 1041. 
Nfld.: act enforcing fair remuneration for 
female workers requested by Federa- 
tion of Labour (T. and L.C.), 1263. 
Que.: arguments for equal pay for women 
presented in study by official of Laval 
Centre for Adult Education, 1265; 
equality of wages sought by Provincial 
Federation of Labour (T. and L.C.), 
1010. 

94375— 3£ 



Equal Pay — Con. 

Sask.: enactment of legislation 24; proc- 
lamation of Saskatchewan Equal Pay 
Act, 294. 
United Kingdom — 

petition demanding equal pay for equal 
work signed by one million British 
women, 1265. 

request by National Whitley Council of 
the Civil Service, for equal pay for 
women, rejected, 24. 

equal pay for equal work in public ser- 
vices sought by T.U.C., 1657. 
Sweden — 

state committee of enquiry recommends 
equal pay for equal work in Civil Ser- 
vice, 1115. 
U.S.A.— 

woman who leaves employment because 
she does not receive equal pay for 
equal work, entitled to unemployment 
insurance benefit, 1122. 

equal pay laws urged by National Con- 
ference on Equal Pay, 519. 

equal-pay law passed in New Jersey in 
1952, 1045. 

legislation enacted in New York state in 
1944, 1606. 

Equipment: 

See Transportation Equipment. 

Escalator Clauses: 

Canada — 

conversion of escalator clauses in wage 
contracts from use of cost-of-living 
index to consumer price index, 1533. 
U.S.A.— 

solutions re problem of converting escal- 
ator agreements to new consumer 
price index, 809. 

revision of U.A.W.'s escalator contracts 
accepted by General Motors Corpora- 
tion and Ford Motor Company, 809. 

wage reduction for employees of Inter- 
national Harvester Company, in ac- 
cordance with escalator clauses in 
agreements, 809. 

contract changes between U.A.W. and 
Chrysler Corporation, 809. 

Estimates: 

Canada — 
extracts from Hansard re Department of 
Labour estimates, 835. 

Excess Profits Tax: 

Canada — 

recommendation of Political Action Com- 
mittee of C.C. of L., 361. 

resolution adopted at convention of T. 
and L.C., 1281. 



XXXVI 



INDEX 



Exhibits : 

Canada — 
illustration of Department of Labour ex- 
hibit shown at Canadian fairs and 
exhibitions during 1953, 986-87. 

Expenditure : 

Canada — 

personal expenditure and income in 1952. 
1013. 

family expenditures for health services, 
1121. 

D.B. of S. report on expenditures on 
formal education in Canada in 1950. 
1429. 

recommendation of Canadian Chamber of 
Commerce re government expendi- 
tures, 229. 

Explosives : 

Canada — 

recommendations of R.T.B., 545. 

Alta. : new sections covering use of milli- 
second delay action detonators added 
to regulations under Coal Mines 
Regulation Act, 289. 

Express Employees, Brotherhood of: 

See Brotherhood of Express Employees. 

Factories : 

I.L.O. meeting of experts of different 
I nationalities to study methods of in- 

creasing productivity within the fac- 
tory, 50. 

Alta.— 
Safety Code for the Woodworking Indus- 
try adopted as regulations under Fac- 
tories Act, 584; safety regulations 
under Factories Act governing erec- 
tion of derricks and cleaning, repair- 
ing . . . gas and oil well drilling plants, 
etc., 737. 

N.B.: employment of children in factories — 
administration of Factories Act in 
1952, 1012; inspections in 1952, 1012. 

Ont.: legislation enacted in 1953 re employ- 
ment of women and young persons, 
1037; new provisions of Factory, Shop 
and Office Building Act. 1640; amend- 
ments to Factory, Shop and Office 
Building Act. 1039, 1186; inspections 
in 1950-51, 435. 

Sask.: activities of Boilers, Factories and 
Elevators Branch. Department of 
Labour (1951), 692; permits granted 
under Factories Act in 1951, 691. 

United Kingdom — 
mid-century report of Chief Factory In- 
spector compares working conditions 
in factories in 1951 with those of 1901, 
1304. 



Factories — Con. 
U.S.A.— 

increased hourly earnings of factory 
workers offset reduction in work-week, 
1763. 

Fair Employment Practices: 

Canada — 
provisions of Canada Fair Employment 

, Practices Act, 1508. ^ 
private member's Bill withdrawn, 1514. 
legislative memorandum of R.T.B., 546. 
report of National Committee on Human 
Rights at annual convention of 
C.C. of L, 1451-52. 
extracts from Hansard re, 31, 194, 388. 
B.C.: Bill not passed, 1040. 
Man. : provisions of Fair Employment Prac- 
tices Act, 1036, 1330. 
X.B.: resolution adopted by N.B. Federa- 
tion of Labour, 1615. 
Nfld.: enactment of Fair Employment Prac- 
tices Act, requested by Federation of 
Labour (T. and L.C.), 1263. 
Ont.: second fair employment practices con- 
ference held by Ontario Federation of 
Labour (C.C. of L.), 813. 
U.S.A.— 

legislation enacted in Alaska and Kansas 

during 1953, 1430. 
membership of Government Contracts 
Committee appointed to prevent dis- 
crimination in employment by com- 
panies holding federal government 
contracts, 1427. 
establishment of Government Contracts 
Committee to prevent discrimination 
in employment, 1261. 
anti-discrimination bill introduced in 
Senate, 813. 

Fair Employment Practices Act: 

enactment, 983. 

provisions, 1508. 

extracts from Hansard re, 667, 832. 

C.C. of L. criticism, 1451-52. 

legislation commended by T. and L.C., 

534; resolution adopted at convention 

of, 1291. 

Fair Wages: 

Canada — 

fair wages conditions in federal govern- 
ment contracts— 122, 299, 448, 594, 744, 
909, 1049, 1196, 1355, 1525, 1661, 1825. 

resolutions on maritime affairs adopted at 
convention of C.C. of L., 1454. 

recommendations of T. and L.C., 533. 



INDEX 



Fair "Wages — Con. 

Man.: schedule of minimum rates of wages 
and maximum hours of work pre- 
scribed by Fair Wage Board for cer- 
tain public and private construction 
work, 1181; amendment to Fair Wage 
Act, 1334. 

N.B.: provisions of Fair Wages and Hours 
of Labour Act, 1037, 1638. 

Nfld.: act enforcing fair remuneration for 
female workers requested by Federa- 
tion of Labour (T. and L.C.), 1263. 

Ont.: second fair employment practices con- 
ference held by Ontario Federation of 
Labour (C.C. of L.), 813. 

Que.: Court of Sessions of the Peace, Terre- 
bonne . . . finds fair wage schedule, 
not Collective Agreement Act decree, 
applies to bridge builder, 1043. 

Family Allowances: 

Canada — 

provisions of collective agreement be- 
tween Dupuis Freres, Montreal de- 
partment store, and National Syndi- 
cate of Trade Employees (C.C.C.L.), 
1140. 

extracts from Hansard re, 372. 

recommendations of C.C. of L., 361, 538. 

increased allowances urged by T. and L.C., 
1290. 
Que.: provisions of collective agreement be- 
tween Dupuis Freres, Montreal de- 
partment store, and National Syndi- 
dicate of Trade Employees (C.C.C.L), 
1140. 

Family Expenditure: 

Canada — 

expenditures for health services, 1121. 

Farm Implements: 

Canada — 

imports of farm implements and machin- 
ery in August 1952 and 1953, 1734. 

resolution adopted at convention of C.C. 
of L. re establishment of Farm Imple- 
ment Council to aid unemployment in 
farm implement industry, 1444. 

Farm Labour: 

Canada — 

tenth annual Federal-Provincial Farm 
Labour Conference (1952), 43. 

extension of unemployment insurance 
coverage to some types of farm work- 
ers urged by National Advisory Coun- 
cil on Manpower, 22. 



Farm Labour — Con. 

B.C.: recommendations of Chief Justice 
Sloan re coverage of farm workers 
under Workmen's Compensation Act, 
553. 

Ont.: N.E.S. recruitment of workers from 
Maritime and Prairie Provinces to aid 
in general farm work, haymaking and 
harvesting, 992. 

Farm Machinery : 

Canada — 
plan to overcome slump in production of 
farm machinery submitted by steel 
and auto workers to federal govern- 
ment, 17. 

Fatal Accidents: 

See Accidents. 

Federal Contracts: 

See Contracts. 

Federal Elections: 

See Elections. 

Federal-Provincial Farm Labour Agree- 
ments : 

recruitment of workers from Maritime 
and Prairie Provinces to aid in gen- 
eral farm work, haymaking and har- 
vesting in Ontario, 992. 

Federal-Provincial Farm Labour Confer- 
ence: 

tenth annual Federal-Provincial Farm 
Labour Conference (1952), 43 — address 
of Deputy Minister of Labour, 43; 
provincial directors' reports, 43; Cana- 
dian Federation of Agriculture, 46; 
manpower situation, 46; intra- and 
inter-provincial movements, 47; inter- 
national movements, 47; farm labour 
requirements, 47; immigration, 48; 
federal-provincial agreements, 48. 

Federal Service: 

Canada — 
claims for compensation under Govern- 
ment Employees Compensation Act 
(1952-53), 1130. 
See also Civil Service. 

Federation of Industrial Unions: 

See Quebec Federation of Industrial 
Unions. 

Federation of the Wrought Wood Workers 
of Canada: 

amalgamation of wrought wood and fur- 
niture federations of C.C.C.L., 1258. 



XXXVIII 



INDEX 



Fees: 

Man.— 
regulations under Licensed Practical 
Nurses Act, 1656. 

Ferguson, J. D., President, Canadian Manu- 
facturers 9 Association : 

urges greater emphasis on apprentice- 
ship, 1423. 

Films: 

Canada — 

Canadian labour newspapers and journals 
on microfilm, from Federal Depart- 
ment of Labour Library, 754. 

N.F.B. film — Everybody's Handicapped — 
prepared by Department of Labour, 
N.E.S., and National Advisory Coun- 
cil for the Rehabilitation of the Dis- 
abled, 1595. 
Ont.: provisions of Theatres Act, 1646. 

Finance : 

Canada — 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in finance in 1941 and 
1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 1951 
Census bulletin, 28. 

number of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 
1294, 1300. 

recommendations of Canadian Chamber of 
Commerce re public finance and taxa- 
tion, 229. 
Alta.: Students Assistance Act provides 
financial assistance to university 
students, teachers in training and 
student nurses, 1801. 

Finkelman, Prof. J., Chairman, Ontario 
Labour Relations Board: 
appointment, 1426. 

Fire: 

Alta.— 

provisions of Fire Departments Platoon 
Act, 1036. 
Sask: provisions of Act to amend Fire De- 
partments Platoon Act, 1036; activi- 
ties of Fire Commissions and Theatres 
Branch, Department of Labour, in 
1951, 692. 

Firefighters : 

Canada — 
wages, hours and working conditions of 
employees in municipal government 
service, 125-128. 



Firefighters — Con. 

Alta.: new sections under Fire Departments 
Platoon Act provide for collective 
bargaining and compulsory arbitration 
of disputes, 1799; amendments to 
Labour Relations Act providing com- 
pulsory arbitration in disputes involv- 
ing policemen and firemen, 1035. 

Que.: Montreal fire fighters establish health 
co-operative scheme, 28; agreement 
reached between Montreal civic ad- 
ministration and employees, 1597. 

Sask.: amendments to Labour Relations Act 
providing compulsory arbitration in 
disputes involving firemen and police- 
men, 1035; amended provisions of 
City Act and Fire Departments Act 
re compulsory arbitration of dispute 
between firemen and policemen, 1648. 

Firestone, Dr. O. J., Economic Adviser, De- 
partment of Trade and Commerce: 

extracts from address' before Engineering 
Institute of Canada, 28. 

First Aid: 

B.C.— 

report of Chief Justice Sloan on First Aid 
Department of Workmen's Compen- 
sation Board, 681. 

Fish-processing : 

N.S.— 
minimum rate for women workers in fish- 
processing industry, under Women's 
Minimum Wage Act, 1815. 

Fishing: 

Canada — 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in fishing in 1941 and 
1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 1951 
Census bulletin, 28. 

number of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 
1296. 

resolution adopted by Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce re International Con- 
vention on Fisheries, 230. 

appointment of Royal Commission to in- 
vestigate fishing industry, urged by 
T. and L.C, 1291. 
B.C.: herring operations closed — price offers 
rejected by B.C. Fisheries Association 
and United Fishermen and Allied 
Workers' Union (T. and L.C), 23; 
recommendations of Chief Justice 
Sloan re coverage of fishermen under 
Workmen's Compensation Act, 555; 



INDEX 



XXXIX 



Fishing — Con. 

B.C.— Con. 

local of United Fishermen and Allied 
Workers' Union, T. and L.C., secedes, 
and affiliates with Pacific Fishermen 
and Allied Trades Union, S.I.U., Cana- 
dian district, 1425. 

Nfld.: resolutions adopted at second annual 
convention of Federation of Fisher- 
men, 1734, seeks affiliation with T. 
and L.C., 1734. 

Five-day Week: 

Canada — 

proportion of workers on five-day week 
in manufacturing, 40. 

5-day, 40-hour week in manufacturing in- 
dustry (in 1949, 1950, 1951 and 1953), 
1529, 1530. 

five-day week in Canadian manufacturing 
industries in 1952 — plant employees, 
838; office employees, 843. 

number of office employees in manufac- 
turing on five-day week (1949-53), 
1665, 1666. 

provisions of collective agreements in 
manufacturing industries in effect in 
1952, 222. 

extracts from Hansard re five-day week in 
Civil Service, 32. 

recommendations of T. and L.C. re five- 
day week for government employees, 
533, 534; recommends introduction of 
five-day week for civil servants and 
postal employees, 1279; seeks maxi- 
mum five-day, 40-hour week, 1291. 

< B.C.: 5-day, 40-hour week for hospital em- 
ployees provided in agreement reached 
between Vancouver General Hospital 
and L. 180, Hospital Employees Fed- 
eral Union (T. and L.C), 54. 
N.B.: five-day, 40-hour week requested by 
N.B. Federation of Labour, 1615. 

Nfld.: provincial government decrees five- 
day week in St. John's, 994. 

U.S.A.— 
five-day week for office workers in manu- 
facturing industries, 39. 

Food: 

international comparison of retail food 
prices by I.L.O., 1739. 
Canada — 

number of collective agreements and 
number of workers covered by agree- 
ments in food and beverage industrv, 
222. 



Forced Labour: 

report of United Nations — International 
Labour Organization committee on 
forced labour, 1131. 
I.L.O. convention ratified by Cuba, 1625. 
Bulgaria — 

forced labour law enacted, 1136. 
Cuba — 

I.L.O. convention ratified by Cuba, 1625. 
Czechoslovakia — 
enactment of new forced labour laws, 
1136. 

Ford Motor Company: 

U.SA.— 

higher pensions granted in Ford — U.A.W. 
contract, 809. 

revision of U.A.W.'s escalator contracts 
accepted by Ford Motor Company 
and General Motors Corporation, 809. 

need for skilled workers in Canadian in- 
dustry, stressed by Vice-president, 
1259. 

Foreign Policy: 

Canada — 
resolution adopted at convention of C.C. 
of L., 1439. 
U.S.A.— 
recognition of Communist China and its 
admission to U.N. opposed by A.F. of 
L., 1619, resolutions passed at con- 
vention of, 1619. 

Foreign Trade: 

Canada — 

definition of "dumping" in Customs Act 
may require revision, 1603. 

National Catholic Textile Federation 
seeks royal inquiry into textile in- 
dustry, 1264. 

resolution adopted at convention of T. 
and L.C, 1290. 

Forest Fires: 

N.B.— 
resolution adopted by N.B. Federation of 
Labour re reforestation, 1615. 

Forestry : 

Canada — 
number of persons 14 years of age and 

over employed in forestry in 1941 and 

1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 1951 

Census bulletin, 28. 
number of workers affected by collective 

agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 

1294, 1296. 



XL 



INDEX 



Franchise : 

B.C.— 

resolution adopted at convention of Fed- 
eration of Labour (C.C. of L.), 1008. 

Freedom of Association: 

report that rights of trade unions violated 
in Czechoslovakia adopted at 122nd 
session of I.L.O. Governing Body, 1151. 

report of Committee on Freedom of Asso- 
ciation at 121st session of I.L.O. Gov- 
erning Body, 695. 

Freight Elevators: 

See Elevators. 



Furniture Industry: 

Canada — 
Federation of The Wrought Wood Work- 
ers of Canada — amalgamation of 
wrought wood and furniture federa- 
tions of C.C.C.L., 125-8. 

Ont.: strike called by I.W.A., employees of 
Durham Furniture Company, Limited, 
ends without settlement, 361. 

Gallo, Toney, American Federation of 
Labour: 

extracts from address as fraternal dele- 
gate of A.F. of L. to convention of 
T. and L.C., 1287. 



"Fringe" Benefits: 

U.S.A.— 
cost to private industry in 1951 and 1952, 

1266. 
paid vacations general, survey of fringe 

benefit plans reveals, 813. 
trade union benefits in 1951, 404-5. 

Frost, Hon. Leslie M., Premier of Ontario: 

extracts from address at 68th annual con- 
vention of T. and L.C., 1285. 

Fuel: 

Canada — 

C.C. of L. recommends establishment of 

national fuel policy, 538. 
national fuel policy requested by U.M.W. 

policy committee, 1602. 

N.B.: sale of fuel wood by cord ... re- 
quested by N.B. Federation of 
Labour, 1615. 

Que.: abolition of provincial tax on fuel oil 
requested by C.C.C.L., 1469. 

Full Employment: 

statement of I.L.O. views on full employ- 
ment policy approved at 122nd session 
of I.L.O. Governing Body, 1151. 

Canada — 
development of Canadian coal policy to 
provide full employment in coal min- 
ing' industry, urged by C.C. of L., 
1443-44. 
recommendation of Political Action Com- 
mittee of C.C. of L., 361. 

United Kingdom — 

labour mobility encouraged by full em- 
ployment, 1329. 
See also Employment. 



Garage and Service Station Industry: 

U.S.A.— 
organization of workers divided between 
International Association of Machinists 
and International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, 661. ' 

Gas: 

Canada — 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in gas industry in 1941 
and 1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 
1951 Census bulletin, 28. 

building of trans-Canada gas and oil pipe- 
lines urged by C.C. of L., 1456. 

Alta. : regulations under Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act re gas and oil wells, 
588. 

Sask.: regulations under The Gas Inspection 
and Licensing Act, 1038, 1649; new 
regulations under Boiler and Pressure 
Vessel Act covering safe handling of 
liquefied petroleum gas, 1348; regula- 
tions under Oil and Gas Conservation 
Act, 591. 

General Federation of Labour in Israel 
(Histadrut) : 

Histadrut seeks to link wages to produc- 
tivity, 364. 
affiliation with I.C.F.T.U, 995. 

General Motors Corporation: 

revision of U.A.W.'s escalator contracts 
accepted by General Motors Corpora- 
tion and Ford Motor Corporation, 
809. 

pension benefits paid by General Motors 
raised, 984. 



INDEX 



Germany : 

co-determination law analysed — analysis 
of recently enacted Shop Constitution 
Law of West German Federal Repub- 
lic which reintroduces provisions for 
protection of labour . . . 686. 

Gillnetters: 

B.C.— 

Gillnetters' Association merges with Sea- 
farers' International Union, 1257. 

Gold Mining: 

Canada — 
full support for striking gold miners in 
Northern Ontario and Quebec given 
in emergency resolution passed at con- 
vention of C.C. of L., 1445. 
extracts from Hansard re gold miners' 
strike, 1745. 

Alta.: striking gold miners in Northern 
Ontario and Quebec supported by 
Industrial Federation of Labour, 1755. 

Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company: 

U.S.A.— 
agreement signed between Goodyear Tire 
and Rubber Company and United 
Rubber Workers of America (C.I.O), 
517. 

Government Contracts: 

See Contracts. 

Government Employees: 

Canada — 

, compensable accidents among federal 
employees — Minister of Labour urges 
government workers to avoid acci- 
dents, 571. 

resolution adopted by C.C. of L. re union 
recognition, 1456. 

resolutions adopted at convention of T. 
and L.C, 1279; recommendations, 533. 

See also Civil Service. 

Government Employees' Compensation Act: 

new regulations, 114. 

accident claims under Act during 1952-53, 
1130. 

inclusion of disabled veterans employed in 
Federal Government sheltered work- 
shops under Act — revision of Vetcraft 
Shops Regulations, 1180. 

Government Expenditure : 

See Expenditure. 
94375—4 



Gowers Report (United Kingdom) : 

resolution adopted at conference of T.U.C., 
1657. 

Grain: 

Canada — 

extracts from Hansard re threatened grain 
handlers' strike at the Lakehead, 666. 

Alta.: regulations under Factories Act gov- 
erning construction, operation ... in 
grain elevators, 586. 

Ont.: resolution adopted at convention of 
Provincial Federation of Labour (T. 
and L.C), 1009. 

Grants: 

See Labour Departments and Bureaus. 

Gregg, Hon. Milton F., Minister of Labour: 

Labour Day message, 1125. 
New Year's message, 1757. 
receives Citation of Merit from Interna- 
tional Association of Personnel in 
Employment Security, 990-91. 
examines Department of Labour exhibit 
shown at Canadian fairs and exhibi- 
tions during 1953, 986-87. 
Hansard references: 525, 666, 667, 830-32, 

832, 835, 1745. 
announcements — 

signing of agreements for co-ordination 
of rehabilitation services for disabled 
persons by federal Government and 
governments of Saskatchewan, New 
Brunswick and Manitoba, 1596. 
statements — 

re establishment of women's bureau 
within Department of Labour, 812. 

placement of handicapped persons, 1424. 

urges government workers to avoid 
accidents, 571. 
addresses, remarks, etc. — 

36th Session of International Labour 
Conference in Geneva, 1014. 

13th annual convention of C.C. of L., 
1449. 

68th annual convention of T. and L.C, 
1283. 

meeting of National Advisory Commit- 
tee on the Rehabilitation of Disabled 
Persons, 1746. 

Apprenticeship Training Advisory Com- 
mittee, 865. 

reply to delegation of steel and auto 
workers on submission of plan to over- 
come slump in production of farm 
machinery, 17. 

joint conference of Apprenticeship Ad- 
visory Committee and provincial 
Directors of Apprenticeship, 1608. 



XLII 



INDEX 



Gregg, Hon. Milton F.— Con. 

convention of N.B. Federation of 
Labour, 1611. 

Forest City Kiwanis Club, London, 
Ontario, 867. 

Professional Institute of the Public Ser- 
vice, in Ottawa, 868. 

Hamilton Branch of Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce, 868. 

uniformity of job accident statistics, 
516. 

Grievance Procedure: 

Canada — 
provisions of collective agreements in 
manufacturing industries in effect in 
1952, 222. 

Que.: provisions of agreement reached be- 
tween Montreal civic administration 
and employees (white-collar, police- 
men and firemen), 1597. 

U.S.A.— 
N.L.R.B. rules that union certified as ex- 
clusive bargaining agent of employees 
can not charge non-members fee for 
processing grievances, 905. 

Group Insurance: 

Canada — 

re group insurance costs and the hiring of 
older workers, 209. 

group sickness, accident and/or life insur- 
ance plans for office workers in manu- 
facturing (1949-53), 1667. 

group sickness and accident insurance 
plans in manufacturing industry (in 
1949, 1950, 1951 and 1953), 1531, 1532. 

U.S.A.— 

protection for office staffs in manufacturing 
industries, 39. 

Guaranteed Employment: 

Canada — 
guaranteed employment and wage plans in 
collective agreements, 1269 — in manu- 
facturing industry, 1269, 1270; in non- 
manufacturing industries, 1269, 1271. 

Que.: guaranteed work week for all work- 
ers sought by Provincial Federation of 
Labour (T. and L.C.), 1010. 



Guaranteed Wage: 

report of I.L.O. Building, Civil Engineer- 
ing and Public Works Committee, 
1764. 

memorandum of subcommittee on guar- 
anteed wages — fourth session of I.L.O. 
Textiles Industrial Committee, 694. 

guaranteed annual wage sought by 
U.S.W.A. at policy conference, 1598. 

Canada — 
guaranteed wage and employment plans in 
collective agreements, 1269 — in manu- 
facturing industry, 1269, 1270; in non- 
manufacturing industries, 1269, 1271. 
wage guarantee clause included in provi- 
sions of collective agreements in 
manufacturing industries (1952), 224. 
reporting pay (guaranteed wage) in manu- 
facturing industry in 1951, 1532. 
principles of guaranteed annual wage 
plan sought by I.U.E.W. (C.I.O.) in 
collective bargaining negotiations at 
convention in Montreal, 1598. 
members of Guaranteed Wage Public 
Advisory Committee of U.A.W., 658. 
guaranteed wages — discussion by employer- 
employee relations panel at meeting 
of C.M.A, 996-1002. 
guaranteed annual wage sought by Poli- 
tical Action Committee of C.C. of 
L., 361. 
resolution adopted at convention of T. 
and L.C., 1274. 
U.S.A.— 

members of Guaranteed Wage Public 

Advisory Committee of U.A.W., 658. 

U.A.W. calls for guaranteed annual wage 

in 1955, 658. 
guaranteed annual wage plan proposed by 
U.A.W. opposed by Ford Motor Com- 
pany spokesman, 1599. 
study of relationship between annual wage 
guarantees and unemployment com- 
pensation, 1262. 
guaranteed wage provisions of contract 
negotiated by International Brother- 
hood of Teamsters for Rice-Stix Dry 
Goods Company and Brown Shoe 
Compan}', 659. 
U.S.W.A. seek guaranteed annual wage in 
1954, 659. 

Guides : 

Yukon — 

provisions of Game Ordinance re licensing 
of guides, 894. 

Haggerty, John B., President, International 
Brotherhood of Bookbinders: 

death of, 657. 



INDEX 



XL1II 



Hairdressers : 

Nfld.— 
amended provisions of Shops (Barbers' and 
Hairdressers') Closing Hour Act, St. 
John's, 1803. 

Handicapped Persons: 

adaptability of deaf persons to noisy em- 
ployment reported by I.L.O., 416. 
Canada — 

inclusion of disabled veterans emploj^ed in 
Federal Government sheltered work- 
shops under Government Employees 
Compensation Act — revision of Vet- 
craft Shops Regulations, 1180. 

new federal health grant to provinces for 
rehabilitation of the disabled, 1510. 

extracts from address of Minister of 
Labour at meeting of Forest City 
Kiwanis Club, London, Ontario, 867. 

amended provisions of Merchant Seamen 
Compensation Act, 1509. 

agreements for co-ordination of rehabili- 
tation services for disabled persons 
signed by federal government and 
governments of Saskatchewan, New 
Brunswick and Manitoba, 1596. 

opening session of National Advisory 
Committee on the Rehabilitation of 
the Disabled, 367. 

re-election of Dr. G. Fred McNally, as 
chairman of National Advisory Com- 
mittee on the Rehabilitation of the 
Disabled, 365. 

fourth meeting of National Advisory Com- 
mittee on the Rehabilitation of Dis- 
abled Persons, 1746. 

N.F.B. film — Everybody's Handicapped — 
prepared by Department of Labour, 
N.E.S., and National Advisory Coun- 
cil for the Rehabilitation of the Dis- 
abled, 1595. 

remarks of Mr. Ian Campbell, National 
Co-ordinator of Rehabilitation . . . 
at meeting of National Advisory 
Council on Manpower, 22. 

training of handicapped — reports of meet- 
ings of Vocational Training Advisory 
Council, 397, 398, 1750, 1751. 

extracts from Hansard re pensions for dis- 
abled persons, 198. 

placement of handicapped persons in first 
eight months of 1953, by Special 
Placements Division, N.E.S., 1424. 

employment of disabled persons encour- 
aged by C.C. of L., 1453. 

T. and L.C. and C.C. of L. support rehabi- 
litation of disabled persons, 522. 

resolution adopted by Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce re employment of physi- 
cally handicapped, 230. 

94375— 4J 



Handicapped Persons — Con. 

Alta: regulations under Disabled Persons' 
Pensions Act, 1039, 1180', 1801. 

Man.: agreement for co-ordination of re- 
habilitation services for disabled per- 
sons signed by federal government 
and government of Manitoba, 1596. 

N.B.: agreement for co-ordination of re- 
habilitation services for disabled per- 
sons signed by federal government 
and government of New Brunswick, 
1596. 

Ont.: amended regulations under Disabled 
Persons' Allowances Act, 292; number 
of disabled persons receiving pensions 
under Act, 1205. 

Sask. : provisions of Rehabilitation Act, 1039, 
1651, 1657; agreement for co-ordina- 
tion of rehabilitation services for dis- 
abled persons signed by federal gov- 
ernment and government of Saskat- 
chewan, 1596. 

United Kingdom — 

new type of industrial rehabilitation centre 
established — recommendation of In- 
dustrial Rehabilitation Development 
Committee, 1596. 

Remploy Limited, company established 
under provisions of Disabled Persons 
(Employment) Act, 1944, to provide 
work for disabled, 1748. 

U.S.A.— 
number of disabled persons restored to 
useful employment, 1039. 

Hansard : 

extracts from Hansard of interest to labour 
—31, 191, 372, 524, 665, 817. 

Harvesting : 

Ont.— 

N.E.S. recruitment of workers from Mari- 
time and Prairie Provinces to aid in 
general farm work, haymaking and 
harvesting, 992. 

Haythorne, Dr. George V., Director, Eco- 
nomics and Research Branch, De- 
partment of Labour: 

appointment as an Assistant Deputy Min- 
ister, Department of Labour, 1595. 

chairman of meeting convened by Gov- 
erning Body of the I.L.O. to study 
methods of increasing productivity in 
manufacturing industries, 50. 

extracts from address at 5th annual in- 
dustrial relations conference at McGill 
University, 849. 



XLIV 



INDEX 



Haywood, Allan S., Executive Vice-Presi- 
dent, Congress of Industrial Organi- 
zations: 

death of, 366. 

Health: 

text of recommendation No. 97— Concern- 
ing the Protection of the Health of 
Workers in Places of Employment, 
approved at 36th Conference of I.L.O., 
1149. 

Canada — 
unemployment insurance benefit continues 
during illness, injury or quarantine- 
amended provisions of Unemployment 
Insurance Act, 1116. 
family expenditures for health services, 

1121. 
family expenditures for medical care- 
results of 1950-51 sickness survey 
(D.B. of S.), 1429. 
yearly health bill of average family- 
results of national sickness survey 
conducted by federal-provincial gov- 
ernments and D.B. of S., 811. 
Canadian Chamber of Commerce to study 
establishment of health service pro- 
gram, 229. 
compulsory and binding arbitration in 
place of right to strike in disputes in- 
volving public health and safety, 
recommended by Canadian Bar Asso- 
ciation, 1426; criticism of T. and L.C., 
1426. 
national health plan recommended by 
Political Action Committee of C.C. of 
L., 361. 
Alta.: plumbing regulations under Public 

Health Act, 1655. 
Nfld.: appointment of inspectors under 
Workmen's Compensation Act re- 
quested by Federation of Labour 
(T. and L.C.), 1263. 
N.S.: amendments to Coal Mines Regula- 
tion Act, 1804. 
Ont.: enforcement of Plumbing Code under 

Public Health Act, 1347. 
Que.: survey of working conditions made by 
Jeunesse Ouvriere Catholique, 230. 
294; Montreal fire fighters establish 
health co-operative scheme, 28. 
Sask.: amended provisions of Hospitaliza- 
tion Act, 293, 1652; regulations under 
Health Services Act, 293, 443, 1349; 
free hospital services to recipients of 
old age assistance and dependents pro- 
vided by new regulations under Health 
Services Act and Hospitalization Act, 
293. 



Health— Con. 

N.W.T.: revised regulations under Mining 
Safety Ordinance, 889. 

United Kingdom— 

mid-century report of Chief Factory In- 
spector compares working conditions 
in factories in 1951 with those of 1901, 
1304. 

U.S.A.— 

federal-state co-operation in establishing 
comprehensive medical service recom- 
mended by Commission, 522. 

Health Insurance: 

United Kingdom and Australia approve 
reciprocal agreement on social service 
benefits, 523. 

Canada — 

group sickness and accident insurance 
plans in manufacturing industry (in 
1949, 1950, 1951 and 1953), 1531, 1532. 

yearly health bill of average family— re- 
sults of national sickness survey con- 
ducted by federal-provincial govern- 
ments of D.B. of S., 811. 

CC. of L. requests establishment of 
national health insurance plan, 536, 

1451. . 

R.T.B. urges establishment of national 

scheme, 546. 
T. and L.C. requests national health in- 
surance plan, 532, 1276. 
policy declaration of Canadian Chamber 

of Commerce, on national health and 

health services, 1754. 
Alta.: establishment of national scheme 

urged by Industrial Federation of 

Labour of Alberta, 1755. 
N.B.: establishment of plan requested by 

Federation of Labour, 1615. 

Nfld.: establishment of national scheme 
recommended by Federation of Labour 
(T. and L.C), 1263. 

Que.: provisions of agreement reached be- 
tween Montreal civic administration 
and employees (white-collar, police- 
men and firemen), 1597. 

Australia — 
new medical benefits program, 1122. 
United Kingdom and Australia approve 
reciprocal agreement on social service 
benefits, 523. 

L'nited Kingdom — 
United Kingdom and Australia approve 
reciprocal agreement on social service 
benefits, 523. 



INDEX 



XLV 



Health Insurance — Con. 
U.S.A.— 

voluntary national health and hospitaliza- 
tion insurance plan introduced in Con- 
gress, 522. 

four surveys of health insurance plans by 
Health Information Foundation, 523. 

federal-state co-operation in establishing 
comprehensive medical service recom- 
mended by Commission, 522. 

Health Services: 

Sask.— 

amendment to Health Services Act, 1652. 
See also Medical Services. 

Hemming, Arthur E., Executive Secretary, 
Trades and Labour Congress of 
Canada: 
appointment as Publications Director, 
516. 

Herring Industry: 

B.C.— 
herring operations closed — price offers 
rejected by B.C. Fisheries Association 
and United Fishermen and Allied 
Workers' Union (T. and L.C.), 23. 

Hirings: 

U.S.A.— 

hiring rates, July-August, 1953, 1732. 

provision in New York — New Jersey 
waterfront hiring law requiring regis- 
tration of all longshoremen . . . piers, 
upheld by federal court, 1740. 

Histadrut: 

General Federation of Labour in Israel 
affiliates with I.C.F.T.U., 995. 

seeks to link wages to productivity, 364. 

Communist Party banned from Histadrut, 
521. 

Hoists : 

Ont.— 
provisions of Elevators and Lifts Act, 
1641. 

N.W.T.: revised regulations under Mining 
Safety Ordinance re mciical certifi- 
cates, 889. 



Holidays : 

Canada — 

statutory holidays — provisions of collec- 
tive agreements in manufacturing in- 
dustries in effect in 1952, 222. 

paid statutory holidays in manufacturing 
industry (in 1949, 1950, 1951 and 
1953), 1530, 1531. 

paid statutory holidays for office workers 
in manufacturing (1949-53), 1666. 

resolution adopted by C.C.C.L re Do- 
minion Day, 1469. 

recommendation of Political Action Com- 
mittee of C.C. of L., 361. 

T. and L.C. resolution, 1291; recommends 
amendment to I.R.D.I. Act, 533. 

resolution adopted by Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce re public holidays, 230. 

B.C.: Bill to amend Annual Holidays Act, 
not passed, 1042; provisions of first 
long-term contract in logging industry 
signed between I.W.A. and Western 
Plywoods (Cariboo) Limited, 814; 
annual convention of United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners — pro- 
posal to seek 6-hour day, 30-hour 
week rejected; seeks "fringe" benefits, 
holiday pay, etc., 23. 

Man.: amendment to Remembrance Day 
Act, 1038. 

Nfld.: amended provisions of Shops (Barbers' 
and Hairdressers') Closing Hour Act, 
St. John's, 1803. 

Que.: survey of working conditions of young 
workers made by Jeunesse Ouvriere 
Catholique, 230, 294; Court of Queen's 
Bench, Appeal Side . . . finds employ- 
ees not entitled to pay for "paid" 
holidays under a decree if they fall on 
Sunday, 732. 

Sask.: amendments to Minimum Wage Act, 
1651 ; Court of Appeal dismisses appeal 
by employer from conviction under 
Minimum Wage and Annual Holidays 
Acts, 287. 

U.S.A.- 
provisions of contract signed between 
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company 
and United Rubber Workers of 
America (C.I.O.), 517. 



Holiday Pay: 

Canada — 
holiday pay and severance pay— amend- 
ments to unemployment insurance 
benefit regulations, 1660. 

B.C.: sought by United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners, 23. 



Home Building: 

See Housing. 

Home Work: 

Ont.— 

permits issued in 1950, 436. 



XL VI 



INDEX 



Hospital Insurance: 

B.C.— 

amendment to Hospital Insurance Regula- 
tions under Act, 1343; recommenda- 
tions of Chief Justice Sloan re pay- 
ment of medical costs under Work- 
men's Compensation Act, 569. 

Hospitalization : 

Canada — 
yearly health bill of average family — 
results of national sickness survey 
conducted by federal-provincial gov- 
ernments and D.B. of S., 811. 

Alta.: provisions of Hospitalization and 
Treatment Services Act, 1039, 1800. 

Que.: amendment to Cities and Towns Acts, 
1042. 

Sask.: provisions of Hospitalization Act, 443, 
1652, 1657. 

Hospitalization Insurance : 

U.S.A.— 
voluntary national hospitalization and 
health insurance plan introduced in 
Congress, 522. 

Hospitals : 

Canada — 
statistics, 1121. 

average cost per patient-day in Canadian 
general hospitals, 1457. 

B.C.: workers in prison hospital unit eligible 
for compensation for tuberculosis 
under amended schedule of Workmen's 
Compensation Act, 1181; 5-day, 40- 
hour week and wage increase provided 
in agreement between Vancouver Gen- 
eral Hospital and L. 180, Hospital 
Employees Federal Union (T. and 
L.C.), 54. 

Sask.: free hospital services to recipients of 
old age assistance and dependents 
provided by new regulations under 
Health Services Act and Hospital- 
ization Act, 293. 

Hotels and Restaurants: 

B.C.- 

application of Semi-monthly Payment of 
Wages Act to hotel and catering in- 
dustry, 1344. 

Ont.: legislation enacted in 1953 re employ- 
ment of women and young persons, 
1037. 



Hours of Work: 

Cuba ratines I.L.O. Convention concerning 
hours of work and rest periods, 1625. 

resolution adopted at meeting (fourth 
session) of I.L.O. Petroleum Industrial 
Committee, 234. 

Canada- 
monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics, 5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256. 

extracts from Hansard re five-day week in 
Civil Service, 32. 

number of workers in manufacturing in- 
dustry on 40-hour, 5-day week in 1949, 
1950, 1951 and 1953, 1529, 1530. 

standard weekly hours of office employees 
in manufacturing (1949-53), 1665, 1666. 

five-day week — provisions of collective 
agreements in manufacturing indus- 
tries in effect in 1952, 222. 

normal work week analysed by size of 
establishment in manufacturing, 40. 

standard work week (including 40-hour 
week and 5-day week) in manufactur- 
ing industries, 1952 — plant employees, 
838; office employees, 843. 

average hours worked per week in manu- 
facturing in 1952, 1602. 

average hours worked per week by women 
in manufacturing industries in 1952, 
1602. 

provisions of agreement reached between 
Seafarers' International Union (A.F. of 
L.-T. and L.C.), and four large ship- 
ping concerns, 1427. 

provisions of agreement reached between 
S.I.U. and Shipping Federation of 
Canada, 1597. 

terms of settlement reached between Bro- 
therhood of Railroad Trainmen and 
Canada's railways, 187. 

provisions of collective agreement between 
Dupuis Freres, Montreal Department 
store, and National Syndicate of Trade 
Employees (C.C.C.L), 1140. 

40-hour week in steel industry re-affirmed 
as objective of U.S.W.A., 1457. 

hours of work in certain industries — 
meat products, 599. 
pulp and paper, 749. 
tobacco, cigar and cigarette industry, 
451. 
"progressive reduction" of work week . . . 
sought by C.C. of L., 1446; recom- 
mendation of Political Action Com- 
mittee, 361. 
maximum five-day, 40-hour week sought 
by T. and L.C., 1291; resolution 
adopted at convention, 1279. 



INDEX 



XLV1T 



Hours of Work — Con. 

■ Alta.: amended provisions of City Act re 
closing of shops, 1801 ; " no permanent 
exemptions whatever" in provincial 
regulations governing hours of work — 
resolution adopted at convention of 
Federation of Labour (T. and L.C.), 
1006. 
B.C.: amendments to Male and Female 
Minimum Wage Acts, 1040; new regu- 
lation under Metalliferous Mines 
Regulation Act, 290, 590; five-day, 40- 
hour week for hospital employees pro- 
vided in agreement reached between 
Vancouver General Hospital and L.180, 
Hospital Employees Federal Union 
(T. and L.C.), 54; provisions of first 
long-term contract in logging industry 
signed by I.W.A. and Western Ply- 
woods (Cariboo) Limited, 814; annual 
convention of United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners — proposal to 
seek 6-hour day, 30-hour week re- 
jected; seeks "fringe" benefits, holiday 
pay, etc., 23; Hours of Work Act — 
amendment re industries requiring 8- 
hour day, 44-hour week, 289-90, orders 
under Hours of Work Act and Mini- 
mum Wage Acts re overtime in mer- 
cantile industry for Christmas season, 
115, exemptions under Act — new pro- 
visions of Order, 115, regulations No. 
22A, No. 23A, No. 13A, and No. 23B, 
governing road transport, 590, regula- 
tion No. 39 (exemption covering com- 
mercial travellers), 1181. 
Man.: schedule of maximum hours of work 
prescribed by Fair Wage Board for 
certain public and private construction 
work, 1181; amendments to Appren- 
ticeship Act, 1344; amendment to 
Hours and Conditions of Work Act, 
1038, 1333; bill to amend Hours and 
Conditions of Work Act, not passed, 
1335 ; regulations under Licensed Prac- 
tical Nurses Act, 1656; amendment to 
Shops Regulation Act, 1334. 
N.B.: provisions of Fair Wages and Hours 
of Labpur Act, 1037, 1638; provisions 
of first collective agreement between 
government department and I.B.E.W., 
371; resolution adopted by Council of 
Labour re 40-hour week, 1756; five- 
day, 40-hour week requested by Fed- 
eration of Labour, 1615. 
Nfld.: amended provisions of Shops (Bar- 
bers' and Hairdressers') Closing Hour 
Act, St. John's, 1803; amended pro- 
visions of St. John's Shops Act re 
closing of shops, 1802; provincial gov- 
ernment decrees five-day week in 
St. John's, 994. 



Hours of Work— Con. 

Ont.: activities under Factory, Shop and 
Building Act in 1950-1951, 435; legis- 
lation enacted in 1953 re employment 
of women and young persons in fac- 
tories, shops and restaurants, 1037; 
provisions of Factory, Shop and Office 
Building Act re night work of women 
and young persons, 1640; regulations 
under Hours of Work and Vacation 
With Pay Act re vacation-with-pay 
credit, 738. 

Que.: provisions of collective agreement be- 
tween Dupuis Freres, Montreal depart- 
ment store, and National Syndicate of 
Trade Employees (C.C.C.L), 1140; 
survey of working conditions of young 
workers made by Jeunesse Ouvriere 
Catholique, 230, 294. 

Sask.: provisions of new minimum wage 
order in certain ciites, 814; orders 
under Hours of Work Act, 444, 1191; 
amended provisions of Hours of Work 
Act, 1651, 1818; new provisions of 
Mines Regulation Act, 1187; amend- 
ment to Village Act re closing by-laws, 
1651; permits issued under Factories 
Act and Hours of Work Act in 1951, 
691 ; resolutions adopted by Provincial 
Federation of Labour, 1756, normal 
work week in municipal government 
service — firefighters, police constables, 
and civic labourers, 125, 128. 

Yukon — 

regulations under Hours of Labour Ordi- 
nance (1951), 893. 

Cuba — 
Cuba ratifies I.L.O. convention concerning 
hours of work and rest periods, 1625. 

U.S.A.— 

one-hour increase in average work week 
for production workers in manufactur- 
ing, 994. 

working hours of office employees in 
manufacturing industries, 39. 

decline in manufacturing work week during 
June-July, 1602. 

first New York state labour law passed 
century ago, 1606. 

increased hourly earnings of factory work- 
ers offset reduction in work-week, 1763. 

30-hour work week sought by I.L.G.W.U., 
814. 



XLVIII 



INDEX 



Housing: 

resolution adopted by I.L.O. Building, 
Civil Engineering and Public Works 
Committee, 1766. 
Canada — 

amended provisions of National Housing 
Act, 1511. 

extracts from Hansard re amendment to 
National Housing Act, 818. 

statistics, 18, 189, 365, 657, 810, 983, 1117, 
1260, 1421, 1422, 1601, 1733. 

one-fifth of households overcrowded — 
1951 Census bulletin on housing, issued 
by D.B. of S., 983. 

increase in residential construction in 1952 
— annual report of Central Mortgage 
and Housing Corporation, 517. 

proposed measures to increase and broaden 
supply of mortgage money, 1421. 

convention proceedings of Canadian Con- 
struction Association, 189. 

largest* federal-provincial public housing 
project in Canada under way in 
Hamilton, Ontario, 190. 

recommendations of Canadian Chamber of 
Commerce, 229. 

federal housing program to relieve unem- 
ployment urged by International 
Woodworkers of America, 1739. 

recommendations of C.C.C.L., 542; reso- 
lutions adopted at convention, 1468- 
69. 

C.C. of L. urges adoption of low-rental 
housing scheme, 537; resolutions 
adopted at convention, 1438; low-cost 
housing program urged by Political 
Action Committee, 361. 

recommendations of R.T.B., 546. 

recommendations of T. and L.C., 533, 1280. 
N.B.: resolutions adopted by Federation of 
Labour, 1614-15; resolution adopted at 
Council of Labour, 1756. 
N.S.: Housing and Rentals Act, 1951, con- 
tinued in force, 1806. 
Ont.: largest federal-provincial public hous- 
ing project in Canada under way in 
Hamilton, 190; municipalities blamed 
for housing shortage, 1260; joint low- 
rental program urged by Provincial 
Federation of Labour (T. and L.C.), 
1009. 
Que.: amendments to Acts, 1043. 
United Kingdom — 

statistics, 18, 810, 983, 1260, 1733. 

post-war housing record set in 1952, 517. 
India — 

extension of subsidized housing scheme for 
industrial workers, 1117. 
U.S.A.- 

statistics, 18, 190, 365, 810, 984, 1117, 1260, 
1422, 1601, 1733. 



Human Relations: 

Canada — 
management and the problems of human 
relationships — research program estab- 
lished at McGill University, 995. 
United Kingdom — 

establishment of committees to study 
human problems in industry, 816. 

Human Rights: 

Canada's 1952 report for Human Rights 

Yearbook, 1264. 
report of National Committee on Human 

Rights at annual convention of 

C.C. of L., 1451-52. 

Hutcheson, W. L., former president, United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America: 
death of, 1595. 

Immigration : 

Canada 

monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics, 5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256, 

extracts from Hansard re, 665, 827. 

immigration during first quarter of 1953, 
815. 

See also Migration and Settlement. 

Immigration Act: 

enactment of new Act, 983. 
C.C. of L. criticism, 1451-52. 

Imports: 

import of plywood panels from Japan con- 
demned by International Woodworkers 
of America, 1738. 
Canada- 
recommendations of C.I.O. textile workers 
in brief presented to Federal Cabinet, 
1734. 
slowdown of textile imports urged by 
Assistant Canadian Director of Tex- 
tile Workers Union of America, 1120. 
imports of wool and cotton products and 
farm implements and machinery in 
August 1952 and 1953, 1734. 

Incentive Bonus: 

Canada — 
plant employees in manufacturing industry 
receiving production or incentive 
bonus, 1530, 1531. 

Incentive Schemes : 

1954 contract demands considered at 
policy conference of U.S.W.A., 1598. 



INDEX 



XLIX 



Income: 

Canada — 
labour income statistics, 985, 1732. 
personal income and expenditure in 1952, 

1013. 
personal income in 1952, 365. 
higher income group spend more on health 

services, 1121. 
U.S.A.— 
income payments to individuals in 1952, 

1605. 
labour income statistics, 985. 
personal income in 1952, 365. 
distribution of national wage and salary 

incomes, 1430. 
See also Labour Income. 

Income Tax: 

Canada — 

deductibility of medical expenses — extracts 
from Hansard re amendment to Act, 
191. 

amendment to Income Tax Act requested 
by Canadian Chamber of Commerce, 
1754. 

C.C.C.L. requests — increase in exemptions, 
1469; deduction by workers of trans- 
portation expenses and cost of tools, 
for income tax purposes, 1469; recom- 
mendations, 540. 

C.C. of L. — legislative memorandum, 537; 
recommendation re deduction of union 
dues, 538; resolutions adopted at 
annual convention, 1452; recommenda- 
tion of Political Action Committee, 
361. 

R.T.B. — recommendations, 546. 

T. and L.C. — recommendations, 532; reso- 
lution adopted at convention, 1281. 

India: 

progress under Colombo Plan reviewed at 
16-nation conference held at New 
Delhi, 1603. 

unemployment among educated class re- 
lieved by opening of primary schools, 
1456. 

extension of subsidized housing scheme 
for industrial workers, 1117. 

Government proposals for changes in in- 
dustrial legislation studied by Indian 
Labour Conference, 739. 

Indians: 

Sask.: 
amended regulations under Social Aid Act, 
116. 

Industrial Absenteeism: 

See Absenteeism. 



Industrial Accident Prevention Associations 
of Ontario : 

conference proceedings, 663. 

increase in claims for workmen's compen- 
sation in 1952 noted in annual report, 
985. 

Industrial and Commercial Establishments: 

Que. — 
provisions of Canadian Standards Asso- 
ciation Safety Code for Passenger and 
Freight Elevators embodied under 
Industrial and Commercial Establish- 
ments Act and Public Building Safety 
Act, 1347. 

Industrial Development: 

Canada — 
Canadian business controlled elsewhere at 
close of 1951, 1798. 

Industrial Diseases: 

See Diseases, Industrial. 

Industrial Disputes: 

role of states and provinces in settling 
labour disputes, discussed at conven- 
tion of International Association of 
Governmental Labour Officials, 1045. 
Canada — 

provisions of settlement reached between 
major railways and 17 non-operating 
railway unions, 19. 

railway strike averted — settlement reached 
between Brotherhood of Railroad 
Trainmen and Canada's railways, 187. 

strike averted and settlement reached in 
dispute between Seafarers' Interna- 
tional Union and Colonial Steamships 
Limited, Canada Steamship Lines, 
N. M. Paterson and Sons, and Upper 
Lakes and St. Lawrence Transporta- 
tion Company Limited, 1427. 

compulsory and binding arbitration in 
place of right to strike in disputes 
involving public health and safety, 
recommended by Canadian Bar Asso- 
ciation, 1426; criticism of T. and L.C, 
1426. 

banning of strikes as method of settling 
disputes urged by M.P. and farmers' 
spokesman, 23. 

number of industrial disputes in 1952— 
annual report on strikes and lockouts 
in Canada and Other Countries, 1130. 

resolution adopted at convention of C.C. 
of L. re ex parte injunctions, 1456. 

amendment to Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act recom- 
mended by T. and L.C, 533. 



INDEX 



Industrial Disputes — Con. 
Alta.: amendments to Labour Relations 
Act providing compulsory arbitration 
in disputes involving firemen and 
policemen, 1035; new sections under 
Fire Departments Platoon Act provide 
for collective bargaining and compul- 
sory arbitration of disputes, 1799; pro- 
visions of Police Act, 1800. 

B.C.: criticism of Industrial Conciliation and 
Arbitration Act by Trade Union Con- 
gress (T. and L.C.), 1616. 

Man.: blanket collective agreement covering 
eleven local unions signed between 
Winnipeg Building Trades Council and 
Winnipeg Builders' Exchange, 811. 

N.B.: activities under Labour Relations Act 
in 1952, 1011; provisions of first collec- 
tive agreement between government 
department and I.B.E.W., 371. 

N.S.: amended provisions of Teachers' 
Union Act, 1805. 

Ont.: right to strike must be preserved — 
extracts from address by vice-chair- 
man of Labour Relations Board before 
London Chamber of Commerce, 815. 

P.E.I. : new section re arbitration in disputes 
added to regulations under Trade 
Union Act, 1347; amended provisions 
of Trade Union Act, 1806. 

Que.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1035; re- 
vised regulations under Trade Dis- 
putes Act, 1042; recommendations of 
Provincial Federation of Labour (T. 
and L.C.), 1010. 

Sask.: amendments to Labour Relations Act 
providing compulsory arbitration in 
disputes involving firemen and police- 
men, 1035; amended provisions of 
City Act and Fire Departments 
Platoon Act re compulsory arbitration 
of disputes between firemen and 
policemen, 1648; amended provisions 
of City Act, 1036. 

United Kingdom — 

re replacement of Conditions of Employ- 
ment and National Arbitration Order 
(1940) by Industrial Disputes Order, 
675. 

Industrial Disputes Tribunal rejects claim 
for wage increase for cotton workers, 
363. 

payment of unemployment benefit during 
trade disputes recommended by T.U. 
C, 1657. 

Japan — 

number of disputes during year ending 
June, 1951, 689. 



Industrial Disputes — Con. 

U.S.A.— 

bases for Industrial Relations Act dis- 
cussed in address on current labour 
trends and labour problems, 407, 408. 

See also Arbitration; Conciliation; Strikes 
and Lockouts. 

Industrial Establishments : 

Sask. — 

annual report of Wages and Hours Branch, 
Department of Labour (1951), 691. 

Industrial Expansion: 

Canada — 
industrial expansion, 1948-1952, in trans- 
portation equipment industry, 513. 

Industrial Federation of Labour of Alberta: 

annual convention, 1755. 

Industrial Hazards: 

Ont.— 
annual report of Department of Labour 
(1950-1951), 435. 

Industrial Hygiene: 

B.C.— 

recommendations of Chief Justice Sloan 
re administration of Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act, 683. 

Industrial Peace: 

U.S.A.— 

collective bargaining under "Scanlon Plan" 
— case study into causes of industrial 
peace, issued by National Planning 
Association, 1138. 

causes of industrial peace — report of 
National Planning Association on 
study of textile plant, 1141. 

Industrial Pensions: 

See Pensions. 

Industrial Production: 

See Production. 

Industrial Rehabilitation: 

See Rehabilitation. 

Industrial Relations: 

functions of National Labour Department 
defined in report of special committee 
of I.L.O., 1471. 

resolution adopted at meeting (fourth 
session), of I.L.O. Petroleum Indus- 
trial Committee, 234. 



INDEX 



LI 



Industrial Relations — Con. 
Canada — 

monthly reports on proceedings under 
Industrial Relations and Disputes In- 
vestigation Act— 53, 237, 418, 574, 697, 
872, 1020, 1154, 1314. 

monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics— 5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256, 

conciliation and other proceedings before 
the Minister of Labour— 54, 239, 419, 
574, 698, 873, 1020, 1155, 1314, 

certification and other proceedings before 
Canada Labour Relations Board — 53, 
237, 418, 574, 697, 872, 1020, 1154, 1314, 

current manpower and labour relations 
review— 4, 174, 348, 502, 643, 796, 970, 
1102, 1244, 

comptometer operators not "confidential" 
employees — decision of B.C. Labour 
Relations Board upheld by Supreme 
Court of Canada, in Safeway case, 284, 
984. 

decision of N.S. Supreme Court— that 
Labour Relations Board could not 
refuse to certify union because one of 
officers a Communist — upheld by 
Supreme Court of Canada, 984. 

C.C.C.L. charges Quebec Labour Relations 
Board with persecution of Catholic 
labour movement, 1459. 

Quebec court decision that upheld decer- 
tification of Montreal teachers' union 
for participation in illegal strike, re- 
jected by Supreme Court of Canada, 
984. 

Supreme Court of Canada upholds setting 
aside by Ontario court of certification 
order issued by provincial Labour 
Relations Board to Toronto News- 
paper Guild, 984. 

guaranteed wages — discussion by employer- 
employee relations panel at meeting 
of CM. A., 996-1002. 

Labour Department — University Research 
Committee grants for research studies 
in field of , labour-management rela- 
tions, 657. 

the role of management in accident pre- 
vention discussed at conference of 
I.A.P.A. of Ontario, 663. 

appointment of C. Rhodes Smith, Q.C., as 
chairman of Board, 1257. 

Supreme Court of Canada renders judg- 
ment in cases involving labour rela- 
tions boards of B.C., N.S., Ont., and 
Quebec, 1170. 
8th annual industrial relations convention 

of Laval University, 859. 
extracts from address of Minister of 
Labour before Hamilton branch of 



Industrial Relations — Con. 
Canada — Con. 

Canadian Chamber of Commerce, 868. 
CNR. begins survey of its labour rela- 
tions, 517. 
policy declaration of Canadian Chamber 

of Commerce, 228. 
recommendation of U.M.W. policy com- 
mittee, 1602. 
adoption of National Labour Relations 
Act urged by C.C. of L., 537; resolu- 
tion adopted at convention re ex parte 
injunctions, 1456. 
amendments to Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act recom- 
mended by T. and L.C., 532-33 ; resolu- 
tions re labour relations boards 
adopted at convention, 1290. 

Alta.: amendments to Labour Relations Act 
providing compulsory arbitration in 
disputes involving firemen and police- 
men, 1035. 

B.C.: Bill to amend Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigations Act, not 
passed, 1041; comptometer operators 
not "confidential" employees — decision 
of Labour Relations Board upheld by 
Supreme Court of Canada, in Safeway 
case, 284, 984; part-time members of 
reconstructed Labour Relations Board, 
371; Supreme Court upholds that 
Labour Relations Board cannot be 
compelled to produce record of its 
proceedings, 440. 

Man.: rules governing practice and proce- 
dure of Labour Board under Labour 
Relations Act, 1345. 

N.B.: amendments to Labour Relations Act, 
1035, 1639; activities under Labour 
Relations Act in 1952, 1011; legisla- 
tion forecast in Speech from the 
Throne, 361. 

Nfld.: Magistrate's Court fines company for 
interfering with employees' rights, in 
violation of Labour Relations Act, 111; 
appointment of John H. Crann, vice- 
president of Federation of Labour 
(T. and L.C.), to Labour Relations 
Board, 516. 

N.S.: Rules of Procedure of Labour Rela- 
tions Board amended under Trade 
Union Act, 292; amendment to Trade 
Union Act re check-off of union dues, 
1804; amendments to Labour Rela- 
tions Act, 1035; decision of Supreme 
Court — that Labour Relations Board 
could not refuse to certify union be- 
cause one of officers a Communist — 
upheld by Supreme Court of Canada, 
984. 



LII 



INDEX 



Industrial Relations — Con. 
Ont.: regulations under Labour Relations 
Act amend Rules of Practice and Pro- 
cedure of Labour Relations Board, 
292; Supreme Court of Canada up- 
holds setting aside by Ontario court 
of certification order issued by provin- 
cial Labour Relations Board to 
Toronto Newspaper Guild, 984; the 
role of management in accident pre- 
vention discussed at conference of 
I.A.P.A., 663; permission to sue com- 
pany for union dues deducted from 
employees' wages granted U.S.W.A., 
23; right to strike must be preserved 
— extracts from address by vice-chair- 
man of Labour Relations Board before 
London Chamber of Commerce, 815; 
Prof. J. Finkelman appointed chair- 
man, Ontario Labour Relations Board, 
1426; activities of Conciliation Ser- 
vice in 1950-51, 437, of Labour Rela- 
tions Board, 437; recommendations of 
Provincial Federation of Labour (T. 
and L.C.), 1008. 

P.E.I. : amended provisions of Trade Union 
Act, 1806. 

Que.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1035; 
amendments to Labour Relations Act, 
1035 ; revised regulations under Labour 
Relations Act, Trade Disputes Act and 
municipal and school corporations Act, 
1042; activities of Labour Relations 
Board during year 1951-52, 310; Que- 
bec court decision that upheld decer- 
tification of Montreal teachers' union 
for participation in illegal strike, re- 
jected by Supreme Court of Canada, 
984; appointment of secretary-general 
and legal adviser of Labour Relations 
Commission, 816; C.C.C.L. charges 
Quebec Labour Relations Board with 
persecution of Catholic labour move- 
ment, 1459; 8th annual industrial 
relations convention of Laval Univer- 
sity, 859; 5th annual industrial rela- 
tions conference convened by Indus- 
trial Relations Centre, McGill Univer- 
sity, 849; Superior Court finds pro- 
cedure of Labour Relations Board in 
certification hearing was unfair to em- 
ployer, 286; labour relations official 
replaced, 372. 

Sask.: amendments to Labour Relations 
Act providing compulsory arbitration 
in disputes involving firemen and 
policemen, 1035; amended provisions 
of Trade Union Act, 1648; Court of 
Queen's Bench holds labour relations 
board had jurisdiction to certify union 



Industrial Relations — Con. 
Sask. — Con. 

joint board as bargaining agent, 1339; 
annual report of Department of Labour 
(1951), 690. 

United Kingdom — 
establishment of committees to study 
human problems in industry, 816. 

Industrial Relations Handbook published 
by Ministry of Labour and National 
Service,, 995. 

annual report of Ministry of Labour and 
National Service (1951), 675. 

India — 

Government proposals for changes in in- 
dustrial relations legislation studied by 
Indian Labour Congress, 739. 

Spain — 

establishment of employer-employee coun- 
cils in certain ■ commercial undertak- 
ings, 1735. 
U.S.A.— 

A.F. of L. to settle for amendment rather 
than repeal of Taft-Hartley Act, 30. 

death of Robert F. Wagner, author of 
Wagner Labour Relations Act, 812. 

collective bargaining under "Scanlon Plan" 
— case study into causes of industrial 
peace, issued by National' Planning 
Association, 1138. 

causes of industrial peace — report of Na- 
tional Planning Association on study 
of textile plant, 1141. 

establishment of Board of Mediation and 
Arbitration in New York state in 
1886, 1606. 

bases for Industrial Relations Act dis- 
cussed in address on current labour 
trends and labour problems, 407, 408. 

procedures for investigation of labour- 
management complaints established in 
North Dakota and Oregon, 1430. 

National Labour Relations Board — annual 
report (1952), 1159; unions urged to 
make long-term contracts as bar to 
representation vote, by decision of 
Board, 372; false non-communist oath 
voids certification — Board cancels 
union's bargaining rights, 1606; rules 
that union certified as exclusive bar- 
gaining agent of employees can not 
charge non-members fee for processing 
grievances, 905; orders International 
Typographical Union to bargain in 
good faith, 995. 






INDEX 



LIII 



Industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act: 

monthly reports on proceedings under the 
Act— 53, 237, 418, 574, 697, 872, 1020, 
1154, 1314, 

certification and other proceedings before 
Canada Labour Relations Board — 53, 
237, 418, 574, 697, 872, 1020, 1154, 1314, 

conciliation and other proceedings before 
the Minister of Labour— 54, 239, 419, 
574, 698, 873, 1020, 1155, 1314, 

private member's Bill to amend Act, not 
passed, 1514. 

amendments to Act recommended by T. 
and L.C., 532-33. 

extracts from Hansard re voluntary revoc- 
able check-off, 31, 377, 1745. 

Proceedings Under the Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act: 

Alberta Wheat Pool, Kerr Gifford and Com- 
pany Inc., Searle Grain Company, 
Limited, Pacific Elevators Limited, 
and United Grain Growers, Limited, 
Vancouver, and employees, 54, 239, 
420, 606. 

The Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Rail- 
way Company, Sault Ste. Marie, and 
employees, 697, 1154, 1627. 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk 
River, and employees (salaried, techni- 
cal employees), 1314, 1627. 

British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 
(C.P.R.) and employees, 53, 54, 237, 
1154. 

British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 
(C.P.R.), Canadian National Steam- 
ships Limited and Union Steamships 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees. 
419, 575, 606, 699, 874, 875, 1316. 

British Columbia Steamship Company, 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees, 
54. 

The Brookland Company, Limited (Radio 
Station CKWS, Kingston), and em- 
ployees, 418, 697, 1021, 1316, 1770, 
• 1789. 

The Brookland Company, Limited (Radio 
Station CHEX, Peterborough), and 
employees, 418, 697, 1021, 1316, 1770, 
1790. 

Brown and Ryan Limited, and others, 574, 
699, 874. 1316, 1629. 

Burrard Inlet Tunnel and Bridge Company, 
North Vancouver, and employees, 574, 
697. 

Canada Steamship Lines Limited, and em- 
ployees, 698, 874, 1022, 1315, 1475, 
1483, 1629. 



industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act — Con. 

Canada Steamship Lines, Limited; Colonial 
Steamships Limited; N. M. Paterson 
and Sons, Limited; Upper Lakes and 
St. Lawrence Transportation Com- 
pany, Limited, and employees, 1022, 
1770, 1771. 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and 
employees, 237, 239, 418, 574, 697, 872, 
1020, 1154, 1314, 1473, 1474, 1475, 1769, 
1770. 

Canadian Legion Branch No. 2, Whitehorse, 
Y.T., and employees (cocktail lounge), 
1474, 1769. 

Canadian National Newfoundland Steam- 
ship Service, Canadian National Rail- 
ways, and employees, 698, 699, 874, 
1022, 1156, 1629. 

Canadian National Railways, and employees, 
237, 240, 248, 418, 419, 420, 458, 575, 
606, 699, 707, 872, 1155, 1156, 1314, 
1474, 1627, 1628, 1769. 

Canadian National Railways (B.C. Coast 
and B.C. Lakes, Barge and Ferry 
Service) ; Canadian National Steam- 
ships; Canadian Pacific Railway Com- 
pany (B.C. Coast Steamship Service) ; 
Union Steamships Limited; Frank 
Waterhouse and Company of Canada 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees. 
1020, 1021, 1314. 

Canadian National Railways, Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company, Toronto, 
Hamilton and Buffalo Railway Com- 
pany, and Ontario Northland Railway, 
and employees (various railway labour 
organizations), 54, 55, 240. 

Canadian National Railways and Canadian 
Pacific Railway (Vancouver Hotel Co. 
Ltd.) and employees, 419, 575. 

Canadian National Steamships Limited, B.C. 
Coast Steamship Service (C.P.R.), 
and Union Steamships Limited, Van- 
couver, and employees, 419, 575, 606, 
699, 874, 875, 1316. 

Canadian National Steamships; Canadian 
National Railways (Barge and Ferry 
Service, Port Mann: Barge and Ferry 
Service, Okanagan Lake) ; Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company (B.C. Coast 
Steamship Service) ; Union Steamships 
Limited ; Frank Waterhouse and Com- 
pany of Canada Limited, 1021, 1314. 

Canadian National Steamships; Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company (B.C. Coast 
Steamship Service) ; Canadian Na- 
tional Railways (B.C. Coast and B.C. 
Lakes, Barge and Ferry Service) ; 



LIV 



INDEX 



Industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act— Con. 

Union Steamships Limited; Frank 
Water-house and Company of Canada 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees, 
1020, 1314. 
Canadian National Steamships Limited, and 

employees, 418, 872. 
Canadian Overseas Telecommunications Cor- 
poration, and employees, 54, 699, 700, 
1156. 
Canadian Pacific Air Lines Limited, Vancou- 
ver, and employees, 575, 873. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and 
employees, 53, 54, 237, 240, 260, 418, 
420, 458, 606, 699, 716, 1154, 1314, 1474. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Cana- 
dian National Railways, Toronto, 
Hamilton and Buffalo Railway Com- 
pany, and Ontario Northland Railway, 
and employees (various railway labour 
organizations), 54, 55, 240. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company (B.C. 
Coast Steamship Service), Canadian 
National Steamships and Union Steam- 
ships, Limited, Vancouver, and em- 
ployees, (S.I.U., Canadian District), 
419, 575, 606, 699, 874, 875, 1316. 
Canadian Pacific Railway and Canadian 
National Railways (Vancouver Hotel 
Company, Limited), and employees, 
419, 575. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company (B.C. 
Coast Steamship Service) ; Canadian 
National Steamships; Canadian Na- 
tional Railways (B.C. Coast and B.C. 
Lakes, Barge and Ferry Service); 
Union Steamships Limited; Frank 
Waterhouse and Company of Canada, 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees, 
1020, 1021, 1314. 

Canadian Pacific Steamships Limited, and 
employees, 1020, 1154, 1314, 1627, 1769. 

Canadian Press and employees (editorial), 
American Newspaper Guild, 239, 574, 
697. 

Canadian Stevedoring Company; Pacific 
Stevedoring and Contracting Company, 
Limited, Prince Rupert, and em- 
ployees, 1314. 

Canadian Stevedoring Company, Limited; 
Empire Stevedoring Company, Limit- 
ed ; Louis Wolfe and Sons (Vancouver) 
Limited; and Victoria and Vancouver 
Stevedoring Company, Limited, Van- 
couver, and employees, 419. 

Car Barge Towing Company, Limited, Van- 
couver, and employees, 574, 697. 



ndustrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act — Con. 
Carwil Transport Limited, Toronto, and 

employees, 238. 
Chronicle Company Limited, Halifax, and 
employees (Radio Station CJCH), 
1020, 1154. 
CKOY Limited, Ottawa, and employees, 

1770. 
M. R. Cliff Tugboat Company, Limited, 
Vancouver, and employees, 418, 574, 
697. 
Coastal Towing Company Limited, Vancou- 
ver, and employees, 238, 418. 
Colonial Airlines, Inc., and employees, 574, 

697, 872. 
Colonial Steamships Limited, Port Col- 
bourne, and employees, 1155, 1770. 
Colonial Steamships, Limited, N. M. Pater- 
son and Sons, Limited, Upper Lakes 
and St. Lawrence Transportation Com- 
pany, Limited, and employees, 698, 
874, 1022, 1315,. 1475, 1489, 1629, 1770, 
1771. 
Dola Towing Company Limited, Vancouver, 

and employees, 238, 418. 
Dolmage Towing Company, Limited, Van- 
couver, and employees, 238, 418. 
Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company 
Limited, 574, 699, 874, 1316, 1475, 1629. 
Eldorado Mining and Refining Limited, 
Uranium City, Saskatchewan, and em- 
ployees, 1020, 1474, 1627. 
Empire Stevedoring Company, Limited, and 
others, 419, 574, 699, 874, 1316, 1629. 
Gatineau Bus Company Limited, Hull, and 

employees, 239, 699, 704, 874. 
Giant Yellowknife Gold Mines Limited, and 

employees, 699. 
Gulf and Lake Navigation Company Limit- 
ed, Montreal, and employees, 53, 1020, 
1154. 
Hall Corporation of Canada, Montreal, and 
employees, 872, 1020, 1154, 1474, 1627. 
Howe Sound Lines Limited, Vancouver, and 
employees (S.I.U., Canadian district), 
53. 
Kerr Gifford and Company, Inc., Alberta 
Wheat Pool, Searle Grain Company, 
Limited, Pacific Elevators Limited, 
and United Grain Growers, Limited, 
Vancouver, and employees, (Inter- 
national Union of United Brewery, 
Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Dis- 
tillery Workers of America), 54, 239, 
420, 606. 
Keystone Transports Limited, and employees 
(Canadian Merchant Service Guild 
Inc.), 54, 90, 874. 



INDEX 



Industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act — Con. 

Kingscome Navigation Company, Limited, 
Vancouver, and employees (unlicensed 
personnel of deck, engineroom and 
steward's departments — West Coast 
Seamen's Union-Canada-), 53. 

Lake Erie Navigation Company, Limited, 
Walkerville, and employees, 1154. 

Lakes and St. Lawrence Navigation Com- 
pany Limited, Montreal, and em- 
ployees, 1020. 

MacKeno Mines Limited, Keno City, Y.T., 
and employees, 1474, 1769. 

McCabe Grain Company Limited, St. Boni- 
face, and employees, 54, 88, 1155, 1770. 

Macdonald Hotel (C.P.R.), Edmonton, and 
employees (maintenance), 1155. 

Midland Railway Company of Manitoba 
and employees, 54, 239, 1628. 

Monarch Towing and Trading Company, 
Limited, New Westminster, and em- 
ployees (deck, engineroom and stew- 
ard's departments — West Coast Sea- 
men's Union-Canada-), 53. 

National Harbours Board, and employees, 
698, 874, 1021, 1022, 1316, 1475, 1492, 
1629. 

New York Central Railroad, lessee, on Cana- 
dian lines of Michigan Railroad, and 
employees (locomotive engineers), 
1769. 

Newfoundland Coal Company (mechanical 
operations), St. John's, and employees, 
1022. 

Newfoundland Employers' Association 
Limited, and employees, 873, 1021, 
1022. 

North American Elevators Limited, and 

others, 574, 699, 874, 1316, 1629. 
Northern Alberta Railways Company, 

Edmonton, and employees, 1314, 1629. 
Northern Telephone Company, Limited, and 

employees, New Liskeard, 1314, 1770. 
Northland Navigation Company Limited, 

Vancouver, and employees, 54, 238, 418, 

420, 1769-70. 
Nova Scotian Hotel, Halifax (C.N.R.), and 

employees, 1156, 1628. 
Ogilvie Flour Mills Company Limited, and 

employees, 1314, 1474, 1627, 1769. 

Ontario Northland Railway, Toronto, Hamil- 
ton and Buffalo Railway Company, 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company, 
and Canadian National Railways, and 
employees (various railway labour 
organizations), 54, 55, 240. 



Industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act — Con. 

Oshawa Railway Company and Thousand 
Islands Railway Company (C.N.R.), 
and employees, 419, 575. 

Ottawa Transportation Commission, and em- 
ployees, 239, 420. 

Pacific Elevators Limited, United Grain 
Growers, Limited, Kerr Gifford and 
Company, Inc., Searle Grain Company, 
Limited, Alberta Wheat Pool, Vancou- 
ver, and employees (International 
Union of United Brewery, Flour, 
Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery 
Workers of America), 54, 239, 420, 
606. 

Pacific Stevedoring and Contracting Com- 
pany Limited; Canadian Stevedoring 
Company, Prince Rupert, and em- 
ployees, 1314, 1629. 

The Packers Steamship Company Limited, 
Vancouver, and employees, 1155, 1474, 
1627. 

N. M. Paterson and Sons, Limited, and 
others, 698, 874, 1022, 1315, 1475, 1489, 
1629, 1769, 1770, 1771. 

Patricia Transportation Company Limited, 
Winnipeg, and employees, 239. 

Pioneer Towing Company Limited, Vancou- 
ver, and employees, 1627. 

Polymer Corporation Limited, Sarnia, and 
employees, 872 ,873, 874. 

Purity Flour Mills Limited, and employees, 
872, 1154, 1156, 1474. 

Quebec Central Transportation Company, 
Sherbrooke, and employees, 1155, 1315. 

Quebec Railway, Light and Power Company, 
and employees, 1021, 1156, 1315, 1316. 

Queen Charlotte Airlines Limited, and em- 
ployees, 239. 

Radio Station CHEX, Peterborough, and 
employees (Brookland Company 
Limited), 418, 697, 1021, 1316. 

Radio Station CJCH, Halifax, and employees 
(Chronicle Company Limited), 1020, 
1154. 

Radio Station CKOY, Ottawa, and em- 
ployees, 872, 1154. 

Radio Station CKVL, Verdun, Que., and 
employees, 574, 1020. 

Radio Station CKWS, Kingston, and em- 
ployees (Brookland Company Limit- 
ed), 418, 697, 1021, 1316. 

Railway Association of Canada, and em- 
ployees (extra gang employees), 606. 

Railway Express Agency, Inc., and em- 
ployees, 1020, 1156. 



LVI 



INDEX 



Industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act — Con. 

Red River Grain Company Limited, St. 
Boniface, and employees, 575, 699, 
874, 1023. 

The Regina, Whitehorse, Y.T., and em- 
ployees (cocktail lounge and tavern), 
1474, 1768-69. 

Forbes Rhude, and American Newspaper 
Guild, and Canadian Press, 239, 574, 
697. 
• Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited, and em- 
ployees, 239, 420, 873, 1023. 

Sarnia Broadcasting Company Limited, 
Sarnia, and employees (radio announ- 
cers), 1769. 

Saskatchewan Co-operative Producers Limit- 
ed (Flour Mill Division), and em- 
ployees, 697, 872. 

Searle Grain Company, Limited, Pacific 
Elevators Limited, United Grain 
Growers Limited, Kerr Gifford and 
Company, Inc., Alberta Wheat Pool, 
Vancouver, and employees (Inter- 
national Union of United Brewery, 
Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Dis- 
tillery Workers of America), 54, 239, 
420, 606. 

Shawinigan Falls Terminal Railway, and 

employees, 53, 237. 
Shipping Federation of British Columbia 

(Port of Vancouver, New Westminster, 

Chemainus and Port Alberni), and 

employees, 1770. 
Shipping Federation of British Columbia and 

Northland Navigation Company 

Limited, Vancouver, and employees, 

54, 420. 

Shipping Federation of British Columbia, in- 
cluding: Canadian Pacific Railway 
Company (B.C. Coast Steamship Serv- 
ice), Canadian National Steamships, 
General Sea Transportation Limited, 
Griffiths Steamship Company Limit- 
ed, The Packers Steamship Company 
Limited, Union Steamships Limited, 
and Frank Waterhouse and Company 
of Canada Limited, and employees, 
1769. 

Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc., Mont- 
real, and employees, 699, 1475, 1629. 
1770. 

Sorel Dock and Stevedoring Company 
Limited, and others, 574, 699, 874, 
1316, 1629. 

Straits Towing Limited, Vancouver, and 
employees (deck, engineroom and 
steward's departments — West Coast 
Seamen's Union-Canada), 53. 



Industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act — Con. 

Thousand Islands Railway Company and 
Oshawa Railway Company (C.N.R.), 
and employees, 419, 575. 

Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway 
Company, Ontario Northland Railway, 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company, 
and Canadian National Railways, and 
employees (various railway labour 
organizations), 54, 55, 240. 

Tourist Services, Whitehorse, Y.T., and em- 
ployees (cocktail lounge), 1474. 

Trans-Canada Air Lines, and employees 
(maintenance and overhaul depart- 
ment, station services department and 
stores department — International Asso- 
ciation of Machinists), 418, 872. 

J. C. A. Turcotte, Wolfe Stevedores Limit- 
ed ; Empire Stevedoring Company 
Limited; North American Elevators 
Limited; Sorel Dock Stevedoring 
Company Limited; Brown and Ryan 
Limited; and Eastern Canada Steve- 
doring Company Limited, Sorel, and 
employees, 574, 699, 874, 1316, 1629. 

Union Steamships Limited, Vancouver, and 
employees, 54, 237, 239, 418. 

Union Steamships Limited, Vancouver, 
Canadian National Steamships Limit- 
ed, and B.C. Coast Steamship Serv- 
ice (C.P.R.), and employees, 419, 575, 
606, 699, 874, 875, 1316. 

Union Steamships Limited, Frank Water- 
house and Company of Canada 
Limited, Canadian National Steam- 
ships, Canadian Pacific Railway Com- 
pany (B.C. Coast Steamship Service), 
Canadian National Railways (B.C. 
Coast and B.C. Lakes, Barge and 
Ferry Service), Vancouver, and em- 
ployees, 1020, 1021, 1314. 

United Grain Growers. Limited, Searle Grain 
Company Limited, Pacific Elevators 
Limited, Kerr Gifford and Company, 
Inc., Alberta Wheat Pool, Vancouver, 
and employees, 54, 239, 420, 606. 

United Keno Hill Mines Limited, Elsa, Y.T., 
and employees, 1769. 

Upper Lakes and St. Lawrence Transporta- 
tion Company Limited, and others, 
698, 874, 1022, 1315, 1475, 1489, 1629, 
1770, 1771. 

Vancouver Barge Transportation Limited, 
and employees, 239, 420, 1628, 1770. 

Vancouver Hotel Company Limited (C.N.R. 
and C.P.R.), and employees, 419. 



INDEX 



LVII 



Industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act — Con. 
Vancouver Tug Boat Company, Limited, 
Vancouver, and employees (deck, 
engineroom and steward's department 
— West Coast Seamen's Union-Can- 
ada), 53. 

Victoria and Vancouver Stevedoring Com- 
pany Limited, Canadian Stevedoring 
Company, Limited, and Louis Wolfe 
and Sons (Vancouver) Limited, Van- 
couver, and employees, 419. 

Frank Waterhouse and Company of Canada 
Limited, Union Steamships Limited, 
Canadian National Steamships, Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway Company (B.C. 
Coast Steamship Service), Canadian 
National Railways (B.C. Coast and 
B.C. Lakes, Barge and Ferry Serv- 
ice), Vancouver, and employees, 1020, 
1021, 1314. 

Westward Shipping Limited, Vancouver, and 

employees, 574, 874. 
Whitehorse Inn, Whitehorse, Y.T., and em- 
ployees, 1474, 1769. 
Wolfe Stevedores Limited, and others 574 

699.. 874, 1316, 1629. 
Louis Wolfe and Sons (Vancouver) Limited, 
Canadian Stevedoring Company, 
Limited, Empire Stevedoring Company 
Limited, and Victoria and Vancouver 
Stevedoring Company Limited, Van- 
couver, and employees, 419. 
Yukon Consolidated Gold Corporation, and 

employees, 574, 699. 
Agreements Resulting from Proceedings 
under The Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act: 
British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 

(C.P.R.), and employees, 54. 
British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 
(C.P.R.), Canadian National Steam- 
ships, Union Steamships Limited, Van- 
couver, and employees, 1316. 
The Brookland Company Limited (Radio 
Station CHEX, Peterborough), and 
employees, 1770. 
The Brookland Company Limited (Radio 
Station CKWS, Kingston), and em- 
ployees, 1770. 
Canada Steamship Lines Limited, Montreal, 

and employees, 1629. 
Canada Steamship Lines, Limited, Colonial 
Steamships, Limited, N. M. Paterson 
and Sons Limited, Upper Lakes and 
St. Lawrence Transportation Company 
Limited, and employees, 1770. 
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and 
employees (editorial), 1475. 



Industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act — Con. 
Canadian National Newfoundland Steam- 
ship Service (C.N.R.), and employees, 
1629. 

Canadian National Railways and employees 
(Nova Scotian Hotel, Halifax), 1628. 

Canadian National Railways (Atlantic, Cen- 
tral and Western Regions), and em- 
ployees, 606. 

Canadian National Railways and employees 
(Canadian National Newfoundland 
Steamship Service), 1629. 

Canadian National Railways, Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company, Toronto, 
Hamilton and Buffalo Railway Com- 
pany, and Ontario Northland Railway, 
and various railway labour organiza- 
tions, 240. 

Canadian National Steamships, Canadian 
National Railways (Barge and Ferry 
Service, Port Mann, Barge and Ferry 
Service, Okanagan Lake), Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company (B.C. Coast 
Steamship Service), Union Steamships 
Limited, Frank Waterhouse and Com- 
pany of Canada Limited, and em- 
ployees, 1314. 

Canadian National Steamships, Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company (B.C. Coast 
Steamship Service), Canadian Na- 
tional Railways (B.C. Coast and B.C. 
Lakes Barge and Ferry Service), 
Union Steamships Limited, Frank 
Waterhouse and Company of Canada, 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees, 
1314. 

Canadian Overseas Telecommunications Cor- 
poration, and employees, 1156. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (British 
Columbia Coast Steamship Service), 
and employees, 54. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and 
employees (dining, cafe and buffet 
car employees), 606. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (East- 
ern, Prairie and Pacific Regions), and 
employees, 606. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and 
Canadian National Railways, and em- 
ployees, 420. 

Canadian Stevedoring Company Limited, 
Empire Stevedoring Company Limit- 
ed, Louis Wolfe and Sons (Vancou- 
ver) Limited, and Victoria and Van- 
couver Stevedoring Company Limit- 
ed, and employees, 420. 

Colonial Steamships Limited, Port Col- 
borne, and employees, 1770. 



LVIII 



INDEX 



Industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act — Con. 

Colonial Steamships, Limited, N. M. Pater- 
son and Sons, Limited, Upper Lakes 
and St. Lawrence Transportation Com- 
pany, Limited, and employees, 1629. 

Giant Yellowknife Gold Mines Limited, and 
employees, 699. 

Kej^stone Transports Limited, and em- 
ployees, 874. 

McCabe Grain Company Limited (Seed 
Plant), St. Boniface, and employees, 
1770. 

National Harbours Board, Halifax, and em- 
ployees, 1629. 

Newfoundland Coal Company, and 
employees, 1022. 

Newfoundland Employers' Association 
Limited (General Cargo), St. John's, 
and employees, 1022. 

Northern Telephone Company, Limited, 
New Liskeard, and employees, 1770. 

Northland Navigation Company Limited, 
and Shipping Federation of British 
Columbia, Vancouver, 420. 

Nova Seotian Hotel, Halifax, (C.N.R.), and 
employees, 1628. 

Ottawa Transportation Commission, and 
employees, 420. 

N. M. Paterson and Sons, Limited, Colonial 
Steamships, Limited, and Upper Lakes 
and St. Lawrence Transportation 
Company, Limited, and employees, 
1629. 

Purity Flour Mills Limited, Calgary, and 
employees, 1156. 

Quebec Central Transportation Company, 
Sherbrooke, and employees, 1315. 

Railway Association of Canada, and em- 
ployees, 606. 

Railway Express Agency, Inc., and em- 
ployees, 1156. 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited, Saska- 
toon, and employees, 1023. 

Shipping Federation of British Columbia 
and Northland Navigation Company 
Limited, Vancouver, and employees, 
420. 

Sorel Dock and Stevedoring Company 
Limited, J. C. A. Turcotte, and em- 
ployees, 1629. 

J. C. A. Turcotte, Sorel Dock and Stevedor- 
ing Company Limited, and employees, 
1629. 

Upper Lakes and St. Lawrence Transporta- 
tion Company Limited, Colonial 
Steamships, Limited, and N. M. Pater- 
son and Sons, Limited, and employees, 
1629. 



Industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act — Con. 

Vancouver Barge Transportation Limited, 
and employees, 420. 

Yukon Consolidated Gold Corporation, and 
employees, 699. 

Industrial Research: 

United Kingdom — 
establishment of committee of Depart- 
ment of Scientific and Industrial Re- 
search to study human problems in 
industry, 816. 

Industrial Safety: 

See Safety. 

Industrial Standards: 

N.B.— 

annual report of Department of Labour 
(1952), 1011. 

Industrial Standards Act (Alberta) : 

agreements, 100, 731, 1169. 

Industrial Standards Act (New Brunswick) : 

agreements, 99, 434, 1168. 

Industrial Standards Act (Nova Scotia) : 

agreements. 99, 433. 

Industrial Standards Act (Ontario) : 

agreements, 99, 434, 730, 1168. 
administration of Act in 1950-51, 438. 

Industrial Standards Act (Saskatchewan) : 

agreements, 100. 

Industrial Welfare: 

Canada — 

provisions of agreement reached between 
Seafarers' International Union (A.F. 
of L.-T. and L.C.) and four large ship- 
ping concerns, 1427. 

enactment of industrial pension plan 
sought by C.C. of L., 1454. 
Sask.: new provisions of Mines Regulation 

Act, 1187. 
United Kingdom — 

mid-century report of Chief Factory In- 
spector compares working conditions 
in factories in 1951 with those of 1901, 
1309. 
U.S.A.— 

payments for pensions and other welfare 
benefits by U.S. corporations, 1266. 

retirement income of $117.50 monthly — 
average benefit provided in collective 
bargaining pensions programs, 1266. 

employer contributions to private welfare 
and pension funds in 1951, 405. 



INDEX 



Industry: 

legislation affecting women and children 
in industry discussed at convention of 
International Association of Govern- 
mental Labour Officials, 1045. 

Canada — 
management and the problems of human 
relationships — research program estab- 
lished at McGill University, 995. 
resolution adopted by Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce re decentralization of 
industry, 230. 

Que.: management and the problems of 
human relationships — research pro- 
gram established at McGill University, 
995. 

United Kingdom — 
establishment of committees to study 
human problems in industry, 816. 

Inflation: 

U.S.A.— 
inflation or depression? — review of eco- 
nomic situation by economic advisers, 
1120. 

Injunctions: 

Canada — 
union officer's appeal against conviction for 
defiance of anti-picketing injunction, 
dismissed by Supreme Court of Can- 
ada, 1336. 
appeal of Tony Poje rejected by Supreme 

Court of Canada, 657. 
resolution adopted at convention of C.C. 
of L. re ex parte injunctions, 1456. 

B.C.: injunction against picketing to pro- 
hibit only picketing accompanied by 
intimidation, modified by Supreme 
Court, 1515; union officer's appeal 
against conviction for defiance of anti- 
picketing injunction dismissed by 
Supreme Court of Canada, 1336; 
appeal of Tony Poje rejected by 
Supreme Court of Canada, 657. 

N.B.: resolution adopted by Federation of 
Labour, 1615. 

Que.: U.E.'s claim for injunction to prevent 
certification of rival union at R.C.A. 
Victor dismissed by Court of Queen's 
Bench, Appeal side, 1338; injunction 
prohibiting textile firm from changing 
conditions while negotiating dissolved 
by Court of Queen's Bench, Appeal 
side, 108. 

U.S.A.— 
I.L.A. strike postponed — injunction im- 
poses truce in Eastern ports, 1605. 



Inspections: 

B.C.— 

revised regulations under British Columbia 
Boiler Inspection Act, 1519; regula- 
tions under Electrical Energy Inspec- 
tion Act, 1181. 
N.B.: boiler and factory inspections in 1952, 
1012. 

Ont.: regulations under Section 44 of Boilers 
and Pressure Vessels Act (1951), 1184; 
boiler inspections in 1950-51, 436; fac- 
tory inspections in 1950-51, 435. 

Sask.: annual report of Wages and Hours 
Branch, Department of Labour (1951), 
691; inspections under Apprenticeship 
and Tradesmen's Qualification Act in 
1951, 691-92; activities of Boilers, Fac- 
tories and Elevators Branch, Depart- 
ment of Labour (1951), 692; activities 
of Electrical Inspection and Licensing 
Branch, Department of Labour in 
1951, 692; regulations under The Gas 
Inspection and Licensing Act, 1038, 
1649; new provisions of Mines Regu- 
lation Act, 1188. 
N.W.T.: revised regulations under Mining 
Safety Ordinance, 890; regulations 
(Canadian Regulations for the Con- 
struction and Inspection of Boilers 
and Pressure Vessels) under Steam 
Boilers Ordinance, 1951, 891. 

Insurance : 

Canada — 

number of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 
1294, 1300. 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in insurance in 1941 
and 1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 1951 
Census bulletin, 28. 
Que.: provisions of agreement reached be- 
tween Montreal civic administration 
and employees (white-collar, police- 
men and firemen), 1597. 

See also Group Insurance; Health Insur- 
ance; Life Insurance. 

Inter-American Regional Organization of 
Workers (O.R.I.T.): 

election of president of T. and L.C. and 
vice-president of C.C. of L. to execu- 
tive board of O.R.I.T., part of I.C. 
F.T.U, 188. 

International Affairs: 

Canada — 
recommendation of C.C. of L., 538. 
legislative memorandum of C.C.C.L., 540. 



INDEX 



International Association of Governmental 
Labour Officials: 

40th annual convention, 1045. 

International Association of Machinists: 

65th anniversary, 661. 

"no-raiding" pact signed by International 
Association of Machinists (A.F. of L.) 
and United Rubber Workers (C.I.O.), 
1259. 

four-year-no-raiding pact renewed between 
U.A.W. and I.A.M., 989. 

organization of garage and service station 
workers divided between International 
Association of Machinists and Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
661. 

International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, 
Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, 
Forgers and Helpers: 

formation, 1118. 

International Brotherhood of Bookbinders: 

death of John B. Haggerty, President, 657. 

International Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers : 

year's holiday with pay after 10 years' ser- 
vice provided in agreement signed 
between union and Hedco Manufac- 
turing Company, 988. 

first collective agreement between govern- 
ment department and international 
union, signed, 371. 

International Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Engineers : 

Sask.: 
members covered under provisions of 
Workmen's Compensation (Accident 
Fund) Act, 117. 

International Brotherhood of Teamsters: 

two Canadian officials dismissed, 1118. 

Eastern Conference of Teamsters, estab- 
lished by International Brotherhood 
of Teamsters, 1736. 

locals of United Brewery Workers of 
America (C.I.O.), join brewery divi- 
sion of Teamsters, 1120. 

organization of garage and service workers 
divided between International Bro- 
therhood of Teamsters and Inter- 
national Association of Machinists, 
661. 

mutual assistance pact signed with Bakery 
and Confectionery Workers' Inter- 
national Union of America (A.F. of 
L.), 1597. 



International Brotherhood of Teamsters — 

Con. 

guaranteed wage provisions of contract 
negotiated by Brotherhood for Rice- 
Stix Dry Goods Company and Brown 
Shoe Company, 659. 

headquarters transferred from Indiana- 
polis to Washington, D.C., 364. 

International Confederation of Free Trade 
Unions : 

proceedings of third World Congress held 
in Stockholm, Sweden, 1123. 

Histadrut, General Federation of Labour 
in Israel, affiliates with I.C.F.T.U., 
995. 

J. C. Bury, former secretary of Vancouver 
labour council (C.C. of L.) joins 
I.C.F.T.U. staff, 1595. 

two democratic Italian labour groups sign 
agreement to collaborate against com- 
munism, under auspices of chairman 
of I.C.F.T.U., 521. 

election of president of T. and L.C. and 
vice-president of C.C. of L. to execu- 
tive board of Inter-American Regional 
Organization of Workers (O.R.I.T.), 
part of I.C.F.T.U., 188. 

International Fur and Leather Workers' 
Union : 

false non-communist oath voids certifica- 
tion — N.L.R.B. cancels union's bar- 
gaining rights, 1606. 

International Harvester Company: 

wage reduction for employees in accord- 
ance with escalator clauses in agree- 
ments, 809. 

International Labour Organization: 

statement of I.L.O. views on full employ- 
ment policy approved at 122nd session 
of Governing Body, 1151. 

report on results of survey on unemploy- 
ment among older workers, 217. 

two Canadian experts complete duties as 
members of United Nations and 
Specialized Agencies Expanded Tech- 
nical Assistance Program, 1261. 

report that rights of trade unions violated 
in Czechoslovakia adopted at 122nd 
session of I.L.O. Governing Body, 1151. 

functions of National Labour Department 
defined in report of special committee 
of I.L.O., 1471. 

majority of Governments favour I.L.O. 
Recommendation on Holidays with 
Pay, 572. 



INDEX 



International Labour Organization — Con.. 

provisions of I.L.O. Convention No. 100 
concerning equal pay for men and 
women for work of equal value, 1018. 

I.L.O. studies problems of women textile 
workers, 235. 

William Yalden-Thomson appointed Assis- 
tant Director-General, 51. 

Douglas M. Young, appointed head of 
personnel office, 51. 

report of United Nations — International 
Labour Organization committee on 
forced labour, 1131. 

C.C. of L. urges appointment of labour 
representative to International Labour 
Conference, 538. 

text of Recommendation No. 96 — Concern- 
ing the Minimum Age for Admission 
to Work Underground in Coal Mines, 
approved at 36th Conference of I.L.O., 
1148. 

text of Recommendation No. 97 Con- 
cerning the Protection of the Health 
of Workers in Places of Employment, 
approved at 36th Conference of I.L.O., 
1149. 

ratifications of conventions total 1,382, 
1625. 

United Kingdom ratifies Convention gov- 
erning crew accommodation and food 
catering on board ship, 1625. 

New Zealand ratifies I.L.O. Holidays with 
Pay Convention respecting agriculture, 
1625. 

Belgium ratifies Convention concerning 
migration for employment, 1625. 

Cuba ratifies Conventions governing 
weekly rest in industry, forced labour, 
holidays with pay, minimum age for 
employment at sea, hours of work and 
rest periods, and final articles revision, 
1625. 

Sweden ratifies Conventions governing 
social security and annual paid holiday 
for agricultural workers, 1625. 

adaptability of .deaf persons to noisy em- 
ployment, 416. 

report on current problems of vocational 
guidance and training for women, 413. 

Third Asian Regional Conference — 

proceedings, 1624. 
Governing Body — 
proceedings of 122nd session, 1151. 
121st session, 695. 
120th session, 232. 
proposed amendment to I.L.O. constitution 

re membership of Governing Body, 

274. 
convenes meeting of experts to study 

methods of increasing productivity in 

manufacturing industries, 50. 



International Labour Organization — Con. 
Thirty-sixth Conference — 
summary of proceedings, Canadian delega- 
tion, texts of recommendations, etc., 
869, 1018, 1145. 
text of address by Hon. Milton F. Gregg, 
Minister of Labour, 1014. 
Industrial Committees — 
Textiles : 

fourth session, 572, 693. 
Petroleum : 
meeting (fourth session), Canadian dele- 
gation, agenda, etc., 232-33. 
Building, Civil Engineering and Public Works 
Committee — 
fourth session, 1625, 1764. 
Publications and Reports — 
Practical Methods of Increasing Produc- 
tivity in Manufacturing Industries, 
1122. 

International Ladies' Garment Workers' 
Union: 

proceedings of 28th triennial convention, 
814. 

"generous" pension plan won by Winnipeg 
factory workers (I.L.G.W.U.), 21. 

requests survey of union members' atti- 
tudes to retirement, 665. 

International Longshoremen's Association : 

strike postponed — injunction imposes truce 
in Eastern ports, 1605. 

resignation of President Joseph P. Ryan, 
1732. 

expulsion of I.L.A. from American Federa- 
tion of Labour, 1617. 

suspension by A.F. of L., 1267. 

perjury charges against Harry Bridges, 
President, I.L.A. , thrown out by 
Supreme Court — citizenship restored, 
993. 

International Longshoremen's Association 
(A.F. of L.) : 

establishment, 1618. 

International Railway Brotherhoods: 

numbers of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1951, by affiliation, 1295. 

International Trade: 

See Trade. 

International Typographical Union: 

establishment of Unitypo Inc., to com- 
pete with publishers where printers on 
strike, approved at convention, 1264. 

N.L.R.B. orders union to bargain in good 
faith, 995. 



INDEX 



International Union of Electrical Workers: 

principles of guaranteed annual wage plan 
sought by I.U.E.W. (C.I.O.) in collec- 
tive bargaining negotiations at conven- 
tion in Montreal, 1598. 

seeks wage increases, 362. 

International Union of Mine, Mill and 
Smelter Workers : 

Canada — 
"spread-the-work" policy sought at annual 
convention, 660. 
B.C.: report of Chief Justice Sloan on ad- 
ministration of Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Act, 685. 
U.S.A.— 
report of Senate subcommittee investigat- 
ing internal security, 522. 

International Woodworkers of America: 

17th annual convention, 1738. 

provisions of first long-term contract in 

logging industry signed between I.W.A. 

and Western Plywoods (Cariboo) 

Limited, 814. 
appeal of Tony Poje rejected by Supreme 

Court of Canada, 657. 
Joseph Morris elected president of B.C. 

District Council, 993. 
appointment of advocates requested by 

B.C. District Council in submission to 

Chief Justice Sloan, 685. 
C.C. of L. willing to unite with T. and 

L.C. — remarks of A. R. Mosher, Presi- 
dent, C.C. of L. at annual convention 

of I.W.W.A., 515. 

Intimidation : 

B.C.— 

injunction against picketing to prohibit 
only picketing accompanied by inti* 
midation, modified by Supreme Court, 
1515. 

Invalid Pensions 

See Old Age Pensions. 

Iron and Steel Products: 

Canada, — 

expansion of plant facilities in iron and 
steel products industry during 1948-53, 
1432. 

plant expansion and employment oppor- 
tunities in 1952, 16. 

number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agree- 
ments in iron and steel products in- 
dustry, 222. 



Iron Foundries: 

United Kingdom — 

mid-century report of Chief Factory In- 
spector compares working conditions 
in factories in 1951 with those of 1901, 
1310. 

Iron Industry: 

Ont.— 

effects of plant expansion on employment, 
1948-53, 1005. 

Israel : 

Histadrut, General Fderation of Labour in 
Israel, affiliates with I.C.F.T.U., 995. 

Communist Party banned from Histadrut 
(General Federation of Labour), 521. 

number of strikes in 1952, 688. 

extensive vocational training program, 
1430. 

Italy: 

two democratic labour groups sign agree- 
ment to collaborate against com- 
munism, 521. 

Ives, J. L. D., Chairman, Dominion Joint 
Legislative Committee, Railway Trans- 
portation Brotherhoods: 
New Year's message, 1762. 
Labour Day message, 1129. 

Ives, Senator Irving M.: 

extracts from address as President of 36th 
session of International Labour Con- 
ference, 1018. 

Japan: 

Review of Labour Conditions in Japan, 

689. 
proposed labour law would curb electrical 

and coal strikes, 817. 

Job Counselling: 

Canada — 
job counselling for older workers — address 
of Dr. W. G. Scott, adviser to N.E.S., 
1137. 

Job Fatalities: 

See Accidents. 

Jodoin, Claude, Vice-President, Trades and 
Labour Congress of Canada: 
extracts from address as Canada's workers' 
delegate to 36th session of Interna- 
tional Labour Conference, 1017. 



INDEX 



Joint Marine Council: 

Canada — 
formation of Council — all marine unions in 
T. and L.C., 515. 

Jurisdiction: 

Canada — 
organizing rights at Edmonton petro- 
chemical plants given to O.W.I.U., at 
annual convention of C.C. of L., 1439. 



Labour Code: 

Canada — 
establishment of national labour code 

urged by C.C. of L., 361, 537, 1444-45. 
amendments to I.R.D.I. Act recommended 

by T. and L.C., 532-33. 

Labour Colleges: 

Que.— 
first labour college in Canada opened by 
C.C.C.L., 20. 



Juvenile Employment: 

legislation affecting women and children in 
industry discussed at convention of 
International Association of Govern- 
mental Labour Officials, 1045. 

text of Recommendation No. 96 — Concern- 
ing the Minimum Age for Admission 
to Work Underground in Coal Mines, 
approved at 36th Conference of I.L.O., 
IMS. 

Canada — 
report of Young Workers' Committee at 
convention of C.C.C.L., 1466. 

N.B. employment of children in factories — 
administration of Factories Act in 
1952, 1012. 

Out.: legislation enacted in 1953 re employ- 
ment of women and young persons in 
factories, shops and restaurants, 1037; 
provision of Factory, Shop and Office 
Building Act re night work of young 
persons, 1610. 

Que.: survey of working conditions of young 
workers made by Jetmesse Ouvriere 
Gatholique, 230, 294. 

Keenleyside, Hugh, Director-General, U.N. 

Technical Assistance Administration: 

statement on technical and economic aid, 

27. 

Kelly, Emmett, National Secretary, Brother- 
hood of Express Employees: 
announces merger of C.C. of L. rail union 
with A.F. of L. railway clerks, 516. 

Labour and National Service: 

See Ministry of Labour and National 
Service. 

Labour Attaches: 

appointment of John A. Ballew as Labour 
Attache at United States Embassy in 
Ottawa, 516. 



Labour Councils: 

N.B.— 

50th anniversary of Saint John Trades and 
Labour Council (T. and L.C.), 370. 
Que.: Superior Council of Labour elects 
officers, 27. 

Labour Day: 

Canada — 

Labour Day message of Minister of 
Labour, Hon. Milton F. Gregg, 1125. 

messages of labour leaders — Percy R. Ben- 
gough, President, T. and L.C., 1126; 
A. R. Mosher, President, C.C. of L., 
1128; Gerard Picard, General Presi- 
dent, C.C.C.L, 1129; J. L. D. Ives, 
Chairman, R.T.B., 1129. 

Labour Departments and Bureaus: 

functions of National Labour Department 
defined in report of special committee 
of I.L.O, 1471. 
Canada — 

retirement of Dr. A. MacNamara, Deputy 
Minister of Labour, 410. 

appointment of A. H. Brown, as Deputy 
Minister of Labour, 411. 

appointment of Dr. George V. Haythorne, 
as an Assistant Deputy Minister, De- 
partment of Labour, 1595. 

annual report of Federal Department of 
Labour (1952), 19. 

provision for establishment of women's 
bureau within Department, announced 
by Minister of Labour, 812. 

re appointment of Director of Women's 
Bureau, Federal Department of 
Labour, 1422, 1510. 

report of Employees' Compensation 
Branch, Department of Labour, 370. 

scarcity of Canadian scientific and pro- 
fessional personnel indicated in survey 
conducted by Department of Labour, 
988. 

illustration of Department of Labour ex- 
hibit shown at Canadian fairs and 
exhibitions during 1953, 986-87. 



INDEX 



Labour Departments and Bureaus — Con. 

Canada's 1952 report for Human Rights 
Yearbook prepared by Federal Depart- 
ment of Labour, 1264. 

extracts from Hansard re Department of 
Labour estimates, 835. 

Labour Department — University Research 
Committee study applications for re- 
search grants, 657. 

publication of monthly labour gazette by 
provincial departments of labour, 
urged by T. and L.C., 1291, 

The Problem of the Older Worker — memo- 
randum on Canada's ageing population 
prepared by Information Branch, 203. 
Alta.: administration of Boilers Act trans- 
ferred to Department of Industries 
and Labour, 1802; appointment of 
Norman A. Willmore as Minister of 
Department of Industries and Labour, 
1734. 

Ont.: annual report of Department of 

Labour (1950-1951), 435. 
Sask.: annual report of Department of 

Labour (1951), 690. 
U.S.A.— 
re-organization of Department of Labour, 

1266. 
resignation of Martin P. Durkin, Secretary 

of Labour, 1257. 
appointment of James P. Mitchell, as Sec- 
retary of Labour, 1433. 
resignation of Frieda S. Miller, Director 

of Women's Bureau, Department of 

Labour, 1737. 
annual report of Department of Labour, 

1604. 
nomination of John W. Edelman as 

Assistant Secretary of Labour, 362. 

Labour Disputes: 

See Industrial Disputes. 

Labour Education: 

Canada — 
recommendation of C.C. of L. re trade 
union educational material for immi- 
grants, 1456. 
See also Workers' Education. 

Labour Force: 

Canada — 
monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics, 5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256, 

current labour market — monthly report on 
labour force survey conducted by 
D.B. of S., 1, 



Labour Force — Con. 
Canada — Con. 

need for skilled workers in Canadian in- 
dustry, stressed, 1259. 

re D.B. of *S. 1951 Census figures of occu- 
pation groups of labour force popula- 
tion, 22. 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in Canadian industries 
in 1941 and 1951, as reported in D.B. 
of S. 1951 Census bulletin, 28. 
New Zealand — 

increase in labour force and population, 
1607. 

unemployment statistics, 1603. 
U.S.A— 

unemployment at new post-war low, 30. 

employment improves in major labour 
markets, 30. 

number of women in paid employment 
quadrupled in 60 years, 1425. 

number of railroad workers 65 years of age 
and over in 1951, 994. 

See also Unemp^ment. 

Labour Gazette: 

Canada — 
publication of monthly edition by provin- 
cial departments of labour, urged by 
T. and L.C., 1291. 

Labour Income: 

Canada — 

monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics, 5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256, 

labour income as of August, 1953, as re- 
ported by D.B. of S., 1732. 

record high in October, 1952, 190. 

labour income in November, 1952, breaks 
previous records, 364. 

See also Income. 

Labour Legislation: 

Canada — 

recent regulations, federal and provincial — 
113, 289, 442, 584, 737, 899, 1179, 1342, 

legislation enacted by 21st Parliament at 
7th session, 1508. 

12th annual conference of C.A.A.L.L., 1520. 

1952 edition of Provincial Labour Stan- 
dards issued by Federal Department 
of Labour, 135, 294. 

highlights of labour laws enacted by pro- 
vincial legislatures in 1953, 1033. 

Dominion legislative proposals of labour 
organizations: T. and L.C., 531; C.C. 
of L., 536; C.C.C.L., 539; R.T.B., 544. 

National Federation of Public Employees 
urges amendment to British North 
America Act, 1263. 



INDEX 



Labour Legislation — Con. 

Canada — Con. 
20-point program of Political Action Com- 
mittee of C.C. of L., 361. 

Alta.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1799. 

B.C.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1040; equal 
pay bill forecast in Speech from the 
Throne, 1422. 

Man.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1330. 

N.B.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1638; 
annual report of Department of 
Labour (1952), 1011; legislation fore- 
cast in Speech from the Throne, 361. 

Nfld.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1802. 

N.S.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1803. 

Ont.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1639; 
annual report of Department of 
Labour (1950-1951), 435; legislation 
forecast in Speech from the Throne, 
361. 

P.E.I.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1806. 

Que.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1042. 

Sask.: legislation enacted in 1953, 1647; 
proclamation of Saskatchewan Equal 
Pay Act, 294; legislation forecast in 
Speech from the Throne, 361. 

N.W.T.: legislation enacted in 1951 and 1952, 
887. 

Yukon. : legislation enacted in 1951 and 1952, 
887. 

United Kingdom — 
labour laws forecast in Speech from the 
Throne, 1733. 

Bulgaria — 
forced labour law enacted, 1136. 

Czechoslovakia — 
' enactment of new forced labour laws, 1136. 

India^ — 

Government proposals for changes in in- 
dustrial relations legislation studied by 
Indian Labour, Conference, 739. 

Japan — 
proposed labour law would curb electrical 
and coal strikes, 817. 

U.S.A.— 

state labour laws passed in 1952, 1045. 

equal pay laws urged by National Confer- 
ence on Equal Pay, 519. 

legislation enacted in New York state 
since 1853, 1606. 

Labour-Management Co-operation: 

role of states and provinces in settling 
labour disputes, discussed at conven- 
tion of International Association of 
Governmental Labour Officials, 1045. 

94375—5 



Labour-Management Co-operation — Con. 
Canada — 
activities of LMPCs— 52, 236, 417, 573, 696, 
871, 1019, 1153, 1313, 

activities of joint employee-management 
safety committees, 1532. 

recommendation of U.M.W. policy com- 
mittee, 1602. 

Labour Department — University Research 
Committee grants for research studies 
in field of labour-management rela- 
tions, 657. 

the role of management in accident pre- 
vention discussed at conference of 
I.A.P.A. of Ontario, 663. 

recommendation of C.P.R. officer re train- 
ing of skilled workers, 1423. 

guaranteed wages — discussion by employer- 
employee relations panel at meeting 
of C.M.A., 996-1002. 

management and the problems of human 
relationships — research program estab- 
lished at McGill University, 995. 

policy declaration of Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce, 228. 
N.B.: legislation forecast in Speech from the 

Throne, 361. 
Ont: the role of management in accident 
prevention discussed at conference of 
I.A.P.A., 663. 
Que.: management and the problems of 
human relationships — research pro- 
gram established at McGill University, 
995; 5th annual industrial relations 
conference convened by Industrial 
Relations Centre, McGill University, 
849. 
United Kingdom — 

establishment of committees to study 
human problems in industry, 816. 
Belgium — 

joint management and profit-sharing strike 
issues at machine shop plant, 688. 
Germany — 

co-determination law analysed— analysis 
of recently enacted Shop Constitution 
Law of West German Federal Republic 
which re-introduces provisions for pro- 
tection of labour . . .686. 
U.S.A.— 

current labour trends and labour problems, 
405. 

co-determination in United States unlikely 
— report on situation in Germany by 
American researcher, 1739. 

recommendations of special committee of 
Twentieth Century Fund, 1312. 

causes of industrial peace — report of 
National Planning Association on 
study of textile plant, 1141. 



LXVI 



INDEX 



Labour-Management Co-operation— Con. 
U.S.A.— Con. 

collective bargaining under "Scanlon Plan" 
— case study into causes of industrial 
peace, issued by National Planning 
Association, 1138. 
procedures for investigation of labour- 
management complaints established in 
North Dakota and Oregon, 1430. 

Labour-Management Disputes : 

See Industrial Disputes. 

Labour-Management Production Commit- 
tees: 

Canada — 

activities of L.M.P.C.'s— 52, 236, 417, 573, 
696, 871, 1019, 1153, 1313, 

reduction of waste important task, 1169. 

activities of L.M.P.C. in Express Depart- 
ment of C.N.R. at Montreal, 100; at 
Robinson Industries Limited, Hamil- 
ton, 100. 

T. and L.C. requests establishment of 
L.M.P.C.'s in the U.I.C, 1279. 

Spain — 
establishment of employer-employee coun- 
cils in certain commercial undertak- 
ings, 1735. 

Labour Market: 

Canada — 
monthly report on local labour market 

conditions — 6, 
See also Labour Supply. 

Labour Mobility: 

United Kingdom — 
labour mobility encouraged by full employ- 
ment, 1329. 

Labour Officials: 

Canada — 
two Canadian officials of International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters (A.F. of 
L.), dismissed, 1118. 

U.S.A.— 

death of Maurice J. Tobin, former Secre- 
tary of Labour, 1115. 

appointment of James P. Mitchell, as 
Secretary of Labour, 1433. 

death of James P. Shields, Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers, 1118. 

See also Labour Departments and Bureaus. 



Labour Organization: 

Canada — 

reference to Labour Organization in Can- 
ada (1953), 42nd edition, published by 
Department of Labour, 1294. 

organization of white-collar workers in 
manufacturing industries, 33. 

unionization of white-collar workers urged 
by U.S.W.A, 1457. 

C.C. of L. urges organization of office 
workers, 1446. 

appointment of C.C. of L. organizer for 
western Nova Scotia, 1427. 

report of Director of Organization Service 
at convention of C.C.C.L., 1466. 

organizing rights at Edmonton petro- 
chemical plants given to O.W.I.U., 
at annual convention of C.C. of L., 
1439. 
Alta.: concentrated drive by Oilworkers' 
International Union to organize oil 
workers, 1755. 

U.S.A.— 

revision of organizing machinery by A.F. 
of L., 1119. 

joint action in organizing campaigns by 
Amalgamated Meat Cutters and 
Butcher Workmen (A.F. of L.) and 
United Packinghouse Workers 

(C.I.O.), 1119. 

Eastern Conference of Teamsters estab- 
lished by International Brotherhood 
of Teamsters, 1736. 

degree of unionization of plant and office 
workers indicated in resuts of survey, 
1607. 

Labour Papers: 

See Films ; Libraries. 

Labour Permits: 

Man. — 
amendments to Minimum Wage Act re 

special permits, 1334. 
Sask.: permits issued under Factories Act, 

Hours of Work Act and Minimum 

Wage Act, in 1951, 691. 

Labour Relations: 

See Industrial Relations. 

Labour Representation : 

Canada — 

union representation on St. Lawrence Sea- 
way board and equal representation 
on accident prevention boards, re- 
quested by C.C. of L., 1456; other 
recommendations, 538. 

recommendation of R.T.B., 547. 



INDEX 



Labour Representation — Con. 

Que.: resolution passed by Federation of 
Industrial Unions (C.C. of L), 1010. 

Germany — 
co-determination law analysed— analysis of 
recently enacted Shop Constitution 
Law of West German Federal Repub- 
lic which re-introduces provisions for 
protection of labour . . . 686. 

U.S.A.— 
unions urged to make long-term contracts 
as bar to representation vote, by deci- 
sion of N.L.R.B., 372. 

Labour Standards: 

Canada — 

1952 edition of Provincial Labour Stan- 
dards, issued by Federal Department 
of Labour, 135, 294. 

Labour Statistics: 

Canada — 

monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics, 5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256, 

tables, 131, 311, 460, 607, 758, 920, 1062, 
1206, 1366. 

See also Labour Force. 

Labour Supply: 

Canada — 

current manpower and labour relations re- 
view— 1, 171, 345, 499, 641, 793, 967, 
1099, 1241, 

CM. A. warns industry to train personnel 
now to assure adequate supply of 
skilled labour, 816. 

jack of skilled labour acute — appren- 
ticeship training urged by C.P.R. 
officer, 1423. 

availability of skilled and highly-skilled 
manpower studied at meeting of 
National Advisory Council on Man- 
power, 22. 

need for immigrants to make up shortages 
in certain age groups of population — 
immigration target charted by Pro- 
fessor at Laval University, 1302. 
New Zealand — 

increase in labour force and population, 
1607. 

Labour Transference: 

United Kingdom — 
labour mobility encouraged by full em- 
ployment, 1329. 

Labour Trends: 

See Current Labour Trends. 
94375—5* 



Labour Unity: 

formation of International Brotherhood of 
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders, Black- 
smiths, Forgers and Helpers — amal- 
gamation of boilermakers' and black- 
smiths' unions in Canada and U.S.A., 
1118. 

convention proceedings of International 
Woodworkers of America, 1738. 

Canada — 

C.C. of L. willing to unite with T. and 
L.C — remarks of A. R. Mosher, Presi-r 
dent, C.C. of L., 515. 

resolution adopted at convention of C.C. 
of L., 1438. 

T. and L.C— C.C. of L. unity unlikely— 
secretary-treasurer of T. and L.C, 660, 
resolution adopted at convention of 
T. and L.C, 1274. 

program to unite labour movement ap- 
proved at convention of five indepen- 
dent labour unions, 994. 

formation of International Brotherhood of 
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders, Black- 
smiths, Forgers and Helpers — amal- 
gamation of boilermakers' and black- 
smiths' unions in Canada and U.S.A., 
1118. 

convention proceedings of International 
Woodworkers of America, 1738. 

U.S.A.— 

convention proceedings of A.F. of L., 1617. 

A.F. of L. and C.I.O. set up to end "raid- 
ing", at meeting of committee to dis- 
cuss labour unity, 660. 

provisions of no-raiding pact between A.F. 
of L. and C.I.O., 1424. 

convention proceedings of U.A.W., 658. 

unity bid by Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Firemen and Enginemen rejected by 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, 
1119. 

convention proceedings of International 
Woodworkers of America, 1738. 

formation of International Brotherhood of 
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders, Black- 
smiths, Forgers and Helpers — amal- 
gamation of boilermakers' and black- 
smiths' unions in Canada and U.S.A., 
1118. 

Languages: 

Canada — 
technical English taught immigrants in 
Hamilton by Canadian Westinghouse 
Company, 25. 
language instruction for new Canadians — 
report of semi-annual conference of 
Vocational Training Advisory Council, 
398. 



LXVIII 



INDEX 



Laval University: 

8th annual industrial relations convention, 
859. 

need for immigrants to make up shortages 
in certain age groups of population — 
immigration target charted by Pro- 
fessor of History and Geography, 1302. 

Law: 

Canada — 
honorary LL.D. degrees conferred on union 
leaders by St. Francis Xavier Univer- 
sity, 993. 
See also Labour Legislation; Legal Deci- 



Lay-offs : 

Canada — 

extracts from Hansard re railway lay-offs, 
1741. 

federal housing program to relieve unem- 
ployment urged by International 
Woodworkers of America, 1739. 

Leather Industry: 

Canada — 
number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in leather products industry, 222. 

Legal Decisions: 

Canada — 
legal decisions affecting labour — 106, 284, 

438, 583, 732, 895, 1043, 1170, 1336, 
Supreme Court of Canada decisions — 

upholds decision of B.C. Labour Rela- 
tions Board in Safeway case, that 
comptometer operators not "confiden- 
tial" employees, 284, 984. 

upholds decision of N.S. Supreme Court 
that Labour Relations Board could 
not refuse to certify union because one 
of officers a Communist, 984. 

rejects Quebec court decision that up- 
held decertification of Montreal teach- 
ers' union for participation in illegal 
strike, 984. 

setting aside by Ontario court of certifi- 
cation order issued by provincial 
Labour Relations Board to Toronto 
Newspaper Guild, upheld, 984. 

dismisses union officer's appeal against 
conviction for defiance of anti-picket- 
ing injunction, 1336. 

renders judgment in cases involving 
labour relations boards of British 
Columbia, Nova Scotia, Ontario and 
Quebec, 1170. 

appeal of Tony Poje rejected, 657. 



Legal Decisions — Con. 

B.C.: Court of Appeal holds Labour Rela- 
tions erred in finding comptometer 
operators not confidential employees, 
284, 984; judgment rendered by 
Supreme Court of Canada re Labour 
Relations Board et al v. Canada Safe- 
way Limited, 1170; judgment requir- 
ing municipal board to cany out con- 
ciliation board's recommendation con- 
firmed by Court of Appeal, 1338; 
Court of Appeal holds mechanic's lien 
under provincial Act not enforceable 
against an interprovincial pipe line, 
1337; union officer's appeal against 
conviction for defiance of anti-picket- 
ing injunction, dismissed by Supreme 
Court of Canada, 1336 ; appeal of Tony 
Poje rejected by Supreme Court of 
Canada, 657; appeal by members of 
woodworkers' union against conviction 
for contempt of court dismissed by 
Appeal Court, 106; Supreme Court 
holds that Labour Relations Board 
cannot be compelled to produce record 
of its proceedings, 440; Supreme 
Court finds that collective agreement 
entitled machinists' union to perform 
certain drilling, 1516; injunction 
against picketing to prohibit only 
picketing accompanied by intimida- 
tion, modified by Supreme Court, 
1515; Supreme Court . . . issues order 
requiring police commissioners to 
carry out conciliation board's recom- 
mendations, 733. 

Man.: damages awarded to milkman unlaw- 
fully expelled from union, secretary 
ordered to account for funds, 1810; 
Court of Appeal finds one hour ade- 
quate notice of dismissal for painter 
paid by week at hourly rate, 897. 

N.B.: Supreme Court, Chancery Division, 
awards damages to longshoreman for 
penalties imposed by his union con- 
trary to its constitution, 287; long- 
shoremen's union appeal against 
award of damages to member illegally 
expelled dismissed by Appeal Division 
of Supreme Court, 439. 

Nfld.: Magistrate's Court fines company for 
interfering with employee's rights, in 
violation of Labour Relations Act, 111. 

N.S.: decision of Supreme Court — that 
Labour Relations Board could not 
refuse to certify union because one of 
officers a Communist — upheld by 
Supreme Court of Canada, 984; judg- 
ment rendered by Supreme Court of 
Canada re Smith and Rhuland Limited, 



INDEX 



Legal Decisions — Con. 

N.S.— Con. 

v. The Queen, on the relation of Brice 
Andrews et al, 1172; Supreme Court 
refuses employer permission to appeal 
to the Supreme Court of Canada in 
certification case, 111. 

Ont.: judgment rendered by the Supreme 
Court of Canada re Toronto News- 
paper Guild, Local 87 v. Globe Print- 
ing Company, 984, 1174; Supreme 
Court of Canada upholds setting aside 
by Ontario court of certification order 
issued by provincial Labour Relations 
Board to Toronto Newspaper Guild, 
984; High Court of Justice finds Arbi- 
tration Act applicable to clause in 
agreement between engineers and City 
of Hamilton, 441. 

Que.: Quebec court decision that upheld de- 
certification of Montreal teachers' 
union for participation in illegal strike, 
rejected by Supreme Court of Canada, 
984; judgment rendered by Supreme 
Court of Canada re L' Alliance des 
Professeurs catholiques de Montreal v. 
La Commission des Relations ou- 
vrieres de la Province de Quebec et La 
Commission des Ecoles catholiques de 
Montreal, Mise-en-cause, 1117; validity 
of decree under Collective Agreement 
Act fixing minimum hairdressing rates, 
upheld, 1808; refrigeration company 
must pay painters, carpenters rates set 
in construction trade decree, 1810; 
holding that employer was not negli- 
gent, Superior Court dismisses action 
of injured worker for damages, 110; 
injunction prohibiting textile firm 
from changing work conditions while 
negotiating dissolved by Court of 
Queen's Bench, Appeal side, 108; 
Court of Queen's Bench, Appeal Side 
. . . finds employees not entitled to pay 
for "paid" holidays under a decree if 
they fall on Sunday, 732; charge that 
city of St. Jean had employed car- 
penters without certificates required 
by parity committee, dismissed, 583; 
Superior Court finds Collective Agree- 
ment Act doesn't authorize parity 
committee to sue for damages, 1340; 
Court of the Sessions of the Peace, 
Terrebonne . . . finds fair wage sche- 
dule, not Collective Agreement Act 
decree, applies to bridge builder, 1043; 
Court of Queen's Bench, Appeal Side 
. . . finds check-off a "condition of 
employment" coming within jurisdic- 
tion of arbitration board, 895; Superior 



Legal Decisions — Con. 

Que. — Con. 

Court finds procedure of Labour Rela- 
tions Board in certification hearing 
was unfair to employer, 286; U.E.'s 
claim for injunction to prevent 
certification of rival union at 
R.C.A. Victor dismissed by Court of 
Queen's Bench, Appeal Side, 1338. 

Sask.: Court of Queen's Bench holds labour 
relations board had jurisdiction to 
certify union joint board as bargaining 
agent, 1339; District Court, Saskatoon 
. . . holds it lacks jurisdiction to set 
aside settlement between injured train- 
man and railway, 1044; Court of 
Appeal dismisses appeal by employer 
from conviction under Minimum Wage 
and Annual Holidays Acts, 287. 

U.S.A.— 

Supreme Court . . . holds union's demand 
for hiring of local band when travelling 
band engaged not violation of law, 735 ; 
Supreme Court . . . holds typographical 
union's practice of bogus typesetting 
not a violation of Taft-Hartley Act, 
734; perjury charges against Harry 
Bridges, President, I.L.A., thrown out 
by Supreme Court — citizenship re- 
stored, 993; N.Y. Supreme Court up- 
holds judgment requiring compliance 
with order of state's commission 
against discrimination, 1517; provision 
in N.Y .-N.J. waterfront hiring law re- 
quiring registration of all longshore- 
men . . . piers, upheld by federal 
court, 1740. 

Legislation : 

See Labour Legislation; various subject 
headings. 

Leopold, Mrs. Alice K., United States Depart- 
ment of Labour: 
appointment as Director of Women's 
Bureau, 1737. 

Level Crossings: 

Canada — 
extracts from Hansard re elimination of, 
387. 

Libraries : 

Canada — 

publications in Library of Federal Depart- 
ment of Labour— 131, 306, 455, 603, 
754, 915, 1057, 1202, 1362. 

Canadian labour newspapers and journals 
available on microfilm, from Federal 
Department of Labour Library, 754. 



LXX 



INDEX 



Licences : 

Man. — 

provisions of Licensed Practical Nurses 

Act, 1334. 
Sask. : activities of Electrical Inspection and 

Licensing Branch, Department of 

Labour, in 1951, 692. 
See also Business Licences. 

Licensing of Guides: 

Yukon — 
provisions of Game Ordinance, 894. 

Licensing of Trades and Businesses: 

Alta.— 
new regulations under Act, 115. 

Licensing of Workmen: 

Alta.— 
revised regulations under Quarries Regu- 
lation Act, 1656. 

N.B.: new section in Electrical Energy Act 
(1931) re licensing of electricians, 1639; 
resolution adopted by N.B. Federation 
of Labour, 1615. 

N.S.: amendment to Engine Operators Act 
re qualifications, 1804. 

Ont.: provisions of Theatres Act, 1646. 

Sask.: regulations under The Gas Inspection 
and Licensing Act, 1038, 1649; new 
regulations under Boiler and Pressure 
Vessel Act covering safe handling of 
liquefied petroleum gas, 1348. 

Liens : 

See Mechanics' Liens. 

Life Insurance: 

Canada — 
group life insurance plans for office work- 
ers in manufacturing (1949-53), 1667. 

Que.: provisions of agreement reached be- 
tween Montreal civic administration 
and employees (white-collar, police- 
men and firemen), 1597. 

Lifts: 

Ont.— 

provisions of Elevators and Lifts Act, 
1641 ; Elevators and Lifts Act — legisla- 
tion enacted in 1953, 1038. 

See also Elevators; Hoists. 

Loans: 

establishment of international institute for 
building loans requested by I.L.O. 
Building, Civil Engineering and Public 
Works Committee, 1766. 



Loans — Con. 
Canada — 
amended provisions of National Housing 

Act, 1511-12. 
provisions of Co-operative Credit Associa- 
tions Act, 1513. 
N.B.: resolution adopted by N. B. Federa- 
tion of Labour re housing, 1614-15. 

Logging: 

Canada — 
number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in logging in 1941 and 
1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 1951 
Census bulletin, 28. 

B.C.: provisions of first long-term contract 
in logging industry signed between 
I.W.A. and Western Plywoods (Cari- 
boo) Limited, 814. 

Longshoremen : 

N.B.— 

Supreme Court, Chancery Division awards 
damages to longshoreman for pen- 
alties imposed by his union contrary 
to its constitution, 287; longshore- 
men's union appeal against award 
of damages to member illegally 
expelled dismissed by Appeal Divi- 
sion of Supreme Court, 439. 
U.S.A.— 

suspension of International Longshore- 
men's Association by A.F. of L., 1267. 

application of certain longshoremen for 
charter for new union to be known 
as American Federation of Longshore- 
men, 1267. 

I.L.A. strike postponed — injunction im- 
poses truce in Eastern ports, 1605. 

provision in N.Y.-N.J. waterfront hiring 
law requiring registration of all long- 
shoremen . . . piers, upheld by federal 
court, 1740. 

racketeering on New York city waterfront 
curbed by legislation enacted by states 
of New York and New Jersey, 1143. 

Lotteries : 

Canada — 
resolution adopted at convention of T. and 
L.C., 1288. 

Lumbering : 

B.C.— 
wages cut by non-union lumber mills, 1596. 

MacDonald, Donald, Secretary-Treasurer, 
Canadian Congress of Labour: 
remarks at World Congress of I.C.F.T.U., 
1123. 



INDEX 



Machine Tool Industry: 

U.S.A.— 

collective bargaining under "Scanlon Plan" 
— case study into causes of industrial 
peace, issued by National Planning 
Association, 1138. 

Machinery : 

Canada — 
imports of farm implements and machinery 
during August 1952 and 1953, 1734. 

Machinists: 

B.C.— 

minimum wage for machinist trade under 
Male Minimum Wage Act, 1344; 
Supreme Court finds that collective 
agreement entitled machinists' union 
to perform certain drilling, 1516. 

Machinists, International Association of: 

See International Association of Machin- 
ists. 

MacNamara, Dr. A., Deputy Minister of 
Labour: 

retirement, 410. 

announces settlement of dispute between 
Seafarers' International Union (A.F. of 
L.-T. and L.C.) and four large ship- 
ping concerns, 1427. 

extracts from address at Federal-Provin- 
cial Farm Labour Conference, 43. 

remarks at meeting of National Advisory 
Council on Manpower, 22. 

remarks at 19th semi-annual conference of 
Vocational Training Advisory Council, 
396. 

Maintenance of Membership: 

Canada — 

provisions of collective agreements in 
manufacturing industries in effect in 
1952, 222. 

U.M.W. contract contains maintenance-of- 
membership clause for first time in 
Maritimes, 1602. 

B.C.: provisions of first long-term contract 
in logging industr}^ signed between 
I.W.A. and Western Plywoods (Cari- 
boo) Limited, 814. 

U.S.A.— 
percentage of union contracts containing 
maintenance of membership clauses, 
993. 



Management : 

U.S.A.— 

current labour trends and labour problems, 
405. 

See also Labour-Management Co-opera- 
tion; Labour Management Production 
Committees. 

Manitoba : 

See various subject headings. 

Manpower : 

functions of National Labour Department 
defined in report of special committee 
of I.L.O., 1471. 

monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics, 5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256, 

current manpower and labour relations 
review, 1, 171, 345, 499, 641, 793, 967, 
1099, 1241, 

change in attitude to older worker urged 
by Hon. Paul Martin, Minister of 
National Health and Welfare, 1733. 

meeting of National Advisory Council on 
Manpower, 22. 

appointment of John W. Pickersgill, as co- 
chairman of National Advisory Coun- 
cil on Manpower, 18. 

availability of manpower for armed forces 
and defence production studied by 
National Advisory Council on Man- 
power, 22. 

extracts from Hansard re National Ad- 
visory Council on Manpower, 32. 

manpower problems in an expanding eco- 
nomy — discussion by Manpower Prob- 
lems panel at annual meeting of 
C.M.A, 1002. 

need for immigrants to make up shortages 
in certain age groups of population- 
immigration target charted by Pro- 
fessor at Laval University, 1302. 

manpower situation discussed at Federal- 
Provincial Farm Labour Conference, 
46. 
United Kingdom — 

annual report of Ministry of Labour and 
National Service (1951), 675. 

U.S.A.— 

review of manpower outlook in the U.S.A. 
— Manpower: The Nation's First Re- 
source, issued by National Planning 
Association, 1497. 

employment improves in major labour 
markets, 30. 

recommendations of National Manpower 
Council in report presented to Presi- 
dent Eisenhower, 986. 

See also Employment; Labour Force; 
Labour Supply. 



INDEX 



Manufacturing : 

I.L.O. meeting of experts of different 
nationalities to study methods of in- 
creasing productivity within the fac- 
tory, 50. 

I.L.O. studies problems of women textile 
workers, 235. 

Canada — 

monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics, 5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256, 

organization of white-collar workers in 
manufacturing industries, 33. 

effects of plant expansion on employment 
in Canada, 1948-53, 1431. 

employment and production in manufac- 
turing in 1952, 1818. 

plant expansion and employment oppor- 
tunities in manufacturing industries in 
1952, 15. 

office employees' working conditions in 
manufacturing (1949-53), 1665. 

plant employees' working conditions in 
Canadian manufacturing industry in 
1949, 1950, 1951 and 1953, 1529. 

motor vehicle industry third largest manu- 
facturing industry, 1428. 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in manufacturing in 
1941 and 1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 
1951 Census bulletin, 28. 

review of manufacturing industries for 1950 
published by D.B. of S., 1428. 

accident prevention facilities in manufac- 
turing establishments, 569. 

standard work week (including 40-hour 
week and 5-day week) in manufactur- 
ing industries (1952) — plant employ- 
ees, 838, office employees, 843. 

normal work week analysed by size of 
establishment in manufacturing, 40. 

average hourly and weekly earnings of 
hourly-rated wage-earners as at March 
1, 1953, 868. 

decline in average hourly earnings in 
manufacturing during July reported by 
D.B. of S., 1602. 

average weekly and hourly earnings in 
manufacturing in 1952, 1602. 

wage rates for male labourers in manu- 
facturing, 1945-1952, 1052. 

salaries of clerical employees in manufac- 
turing industries, 38. 

salaries of office workers in manufacturing 
industries in 1952, 846. 

average weekly wages and salaries in non- 
agricultural industries, 450. 

wage-rate changes in collective agree- 
ments, first 9 months, 1952, 220. 



Manufacturing— Con . 

guaranteed wage and employment plans in 
collective agreements, 1269 — in manu- 
facturing industry, 1269, 1270; in non- 
manufacturing industries, 1269, 1271. 

collective agreements in Canadian manu- 
facturing industries — provisions of 
labour-management agreements in 
effect in 1952, 221. 

number of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 
1294, 1296. 

seniority provisions in collective agree- 
ments in manufacturing, 390. 
Ont.: effects of plant expansion on employ- 
ment, 1948-53, 1004. 
United Kingdom — 

average weekly earnings in manufacturing, 
1602. 

fatalities in 1952, 1293. 
U.S.A — 

working conditions of office workers in 
manufacturing industries, 39. 

one-hour increase in average work week 
for production workers in manufactur- 
ing, 994. 

increase in average hourly earnings in 
manufacturing industry during June- 
July, 1602. 

price cuts rather than wage increase as 
benefits of increased productivity rec- 
ommended by National Association of 
Manufacturers, 660. 

office workers' earnings in New York 
state (1951-1952), 1605. 

National Association of Manufacturers 
opposed to link of wages with produc- 
tivity, 363. 

1952 injury rate lowest in history, 1763. 

Marchand, Jean, General Secretary, Canadian 
and Catholic Confederation of Labour: 
report at 32nd annual convention of 
C.C.C.L., 1464. 

Marine Council: 

See Joint Marine Council. 

Marine Unions: 

See Trade Unions. 

Maritime Affairs: 

Canada — 
resolutions adopted at convention of 
C.C. of L., 1454. 

Maritime Commission: 

resolution adopted at conference of C.C. 
of L. and C.C.C.L. shipbuilding 
unions, 1458. 



INDEX 



LXXIII 



Maritime Marine Workers' Federation 
(C.C. of L.) : 

subsidies for coal mining industry sought 
by Federation, 1116. 

Married Women: 

See Women in Employment. 

Marrocco, Rev. F. A., Canadian Catholic 

Conference : 
extracts from address at 68th convention 
of T. and L.C., 1287. 

Martin, Hon. Paul, Minister of National 
Health and Welfare: 

employment of older workers — extracts 
from address before Canadian Red 
Cross Society, 1733. 

on cost of extending benefits of Work- 
men's Compensation Act to civil de- 
fence workers, 29. 

McDonald, David J., President, United Steel- 
workers of America (C.I.O.) : 
appointment, 29, 521. 

Mc'Gill University: 

meeting of women personnel experts, 812. 

management and the problems of human 
relationships — research program estab- 
lished at McGill University, 995. 

5th annual industrial relations conference, 
849. 

McNally, Dr. G. Fred, Chairman, National 
Advisory Committee on the Rehabili- 
tation of the Disabled: 
• re-election, 365. 
remarks at opening session of Committee, 
367. 

Means Test: 

See Blind Persons; Pensions. 

Meany, George, President, American Federa- 
tion of Labour: 
extracts from address at 72nd annual con- 
vention of A.F. of L., 1617, 1618. 

Meat Products Industry: 

Canada — 
wages, hours and working conditions, 597. 

Mechanics : 

Que.— 
amendment to Motor Vehicles Act re 

licensing of chauffeurs and motor 

mechanics, 1043. 
94375—6 



Mechanics' Liens: 

B.C.— 

Court of Appeal holds mechanic's lien 
under provincial Act not enforceable 
against an interprovincial pipe line, 
1337. 
N.W.T.: revised regulations under Mining 
Safety Ordinance, 889. 

Medical Examinations : 

Que.— 
survey of working conditions of young 
workers made by Jeunesse Ouvriere 
Catholique, 230, 294. 

Medical Research: 

Canada — 
provision of federal money for all medical 
research, urged by T. and L.C., 1291. 
United Kingdom — 

establishment of committee of Medical 
Research Council to study human 
problems in industry, 816. 

Medical Services: 

Canada — 
deductibility of medical expenses — extracts 
from Hansard re amendment to In- 
come Tax Act, 191. 
yearly health bill of average family- 
results of national sickness survey con- 
ducted by federal-provincial govern- 
ments and D.B. of S., 811, 1121, 1429. 
average cost per patient-day in Canadian 
general hospitals, 1457. 

Canadian Chamber of Commerce to study 
establishment of health service pro- 
gram, 229. 

Alta.: provisions of Hospitalization and 
Treatment Services Act, 1039, 1800. 

Que.: Montreal fire fighters establish health 
co-operative scheme, 28. 

Sask.: regulations under Health Services 
Act, 293, 443, 1349, 1652; amended 
provisions of Hospitalization Act, 293, 
1652, 1657; free hospital services to 
recipients of old age assistance and 
dependents provided by new regula- 
tions under Health Services Act and 
Hospitalization Act, 293. 

N.W.T.: revised regulations under Work- 
men's Compensation Ordinance, 888. 

Australia — 
new medical benefits program, 1122. 

U.S.A.— 

voluntary national health and hospitaliza- 
tion insurance plan introduced in Con- 
gress, 522. 
federal-state co-operation in establishing 
comprehensive medical service recom- 
mended by Commission, 522. 



LXXIV 



INDEX 



Merchant Marine: 

complete planning of a Canadian Govern- 
ment merchant marine requested at 
conference of C.C. of L. and C.C.C.L. 
shipbuilding unions, 1458. 

Merchant Seamen: 

Canada — 

strike of merchant seamen ends— provi- 
sions of agreement reached between 
S.I.U. and Shipping Federation of 
Canada, 1597. 

See also Seamen. 

Merchant Seamen Compensation Act: 

amended provisions of Act, 1509. 
extracts from Hansard re, 32, 525. 

Merit : 

See Citation of Merit. 

Metal Mining: 

B.C.— 

decline in fatal accidents in metal-mining 
industry, 1737. 

Metal Products: 

Canada — 
number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of worker^ covered by agreements 
in non-ferrous metal products industry, 
222. 

Metalliferous Mining: 

B.C.— 

regulation under Metalliferous Mines 
Regulation Act, 290, 590. 

Microfilm : 

See Films. 

Migration and Settlement: 

Belgium ratines I.L.O. Convention con- 
cerning migration for employment, 
1625. 
Canada — 

decline in immigration during first six 
months of 1953, 1259. 

fewer immigrants admitted to Canada in 
1952, 369. 

immigration statistics, 25, 1259, 1426, 1735. 

farm immigrants discussed at Federal- 
Provincial Farm Labour Conference, 
48. 

vocational training classes for immigrants 
opened in Montreal, 24. 

technical English taught immigrants in 
Hamilton by Canadian Westinghouse, 
25. 

extracts from Hansard re education of 
immigrants, 524. 



Migration and Settlement — Con. 

Canada — Con. 
need for immigrants to make up shortages 
in certain age groups of population — 
immigration target charted by Pro- 
fessor at Laval University, 1302. 
criticism of Immigration Act by C.C. of 
L., 1451-52 ; recommends establishment 
of Immigration Advisory Committee, 
537; recommendation re trade union 
educational material for immigrants, 
1456. 
declaration of policy of Canadian Chamber 

of Commerce, 228, 1754. 

legislative memorandum of R.T.B., 546-47. 

recommendations of T. and L.C., 534; 

resolution adopted at convention, 1279. 

Alta.: resolution adopted by Industrial 

Federation of Labour, 1755. 
B.C.: resolution adopted at convention of 
B.C. Trade Union Congress (T. and 
L.C.), 1616. 
Australia — 

immigration quota reduced, 369. 
Belgium — 
Belgium ratifies I.L.O. convention concern- 
ing migration for employment, 1625. 
See also Emigration; Immigration. 

Military Deferments: 

U.S.A.— 
recommendations of National Manpower 
Council in report presented to Presi- 
dent Eisenhower, 986. 

Military Service: 

United Kingdom — 
reduction in period of compulsory military 
service recommended by T.U.C., 1657. 

Milkmen : 

Man.— 
damages awarded to milkman unlawfully 
expelled from union, secretary ordered 
to account for funds, 1810. 

Miller, Frieda S., United States Department 
of Labour: 
resignation as Director of Women's 
Bureau, 1737. 

Mine Rescue Stations: 

N.W.T.— 

revised regulations under Mining Safety 
Ordinance, 889. 

Mineral Products: 

Canada — 
number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in non-metallic mineral products in- 
dustry, 222. 



INDEX 



LXXV 



Minimum Age for Employment: 

Cuba ratifies I.L.O. convention governing 
minimum age for employment at sea, 
1625. 
Sask. — 
new provisions of Mines Regulation Act. 
1187. 

Minimum Call Pay: 

Canada — 
employees in manufacturing industry re- 
porting minimum call pay (in 1949, 
1950, 1951 and 1953), 1531, 1532. 

Minimum Wages: 

text of Recommendation No. 96 — Con- 
cerning the Minimum Age for Admis- 
sion to Work Underground in Coal 
Mines, approved at 36th Conference 
of I.L.O., 1148. 
Canada — 

recommendation of Political Action Com- 
mittee of C.C. of L., 361. 

resolution adopted at convention of T. and 
L.C., 1291. 
B.C.: amendments to Male and Female 
Minimum Wage Acts re overtime, 
1037. 

Female Minimum Wage Act — 

amendments, 1040, 1181; Regulation No. 1 
(exemption covering commercial trav- 
ellers), 1181; orders re overtime in 
mercantile industry for Christmas 
season, 116; No. 26 (1953)— road 
transport, 589; Order No. 43 (jani- 
tresses in apartment buildings), 290. 

Male Minimum Wage Act — 

amendments, 1040, 1181; orders re over- 
time in mercantile industry for Christ- 
mas season, 116; minimum wage for 
machinist trade, 1344; Regulation No. 
1 (exemption' covering commercial 
travellers), 1181; Order No. 10 (sheet 
metal workers), 290; Order No. 12 
(construction industry), 443; No. 22 
(refrigeration trade), 590; No. 26 
(1953)— road transport, 589; Order 
No. 43 (janitors in apartment build- 
ings), 290. 
Man.: schedule of minimum rates of wages 
and maximum hours of work pre- 
scribed by Fair Wage Board for cer- 
tain public and private construction 
work, 1181; revised regulations under 
Minimum Wage Act, 1346; amend- 
ments to Minimum Wage Act re 
special permits, 1334. 
N.B.: annual report of Department of 
Labour (1952), 1011. 

94375— 6£ 



Minimum Wages — Con. 

Nfld.: first order issued under Minimum 

Wage Act, 738. 
N.S.: minimum rate for women workers in 
fish-processing industry under Women's 
Minimum Wage Act, 1815. 
Ont.: administration of Minimum Wage Act 

in 1950-51, 438. 
Que.: 
Orders under Minimum Wage Act — 
No. 3 (vacations with pay), 1348. 
No. 3A (holidays with pay in the con- 
struction industry), 1348. 
No. 4 (general order — revision), 899. 
No. 4 (general order — increase in wage 

rates of unorganized workers), 116. 
No. 41 (employees of municipal and 

school corporations), 903. 
No. 42 (stationary enginemen and fire- 
men), 905. 
Sask.: amendments to Minimum Wage Act, 
1037, 1651; extension of coverage of 
Minimum Wage Act, 1189; new wage 
law raises minimum wage in certain 
industries, 814; Court of Appeal dis- 
misses appeal by employer from con- 
viction under Minimum Wage and 
Annual Holidays Acts, 287; appoint- 
ment of Miss M. Flash to Minimum 
Wage Board, 663; annual report of 
Department of Labour (1951), 691. 
U.S.A.— 
first minimum wage laws in United States 
passed in New York state, 1606. 

Mining : 

text of Recommendation No. 96 — Con- 
cerning the Minimum Age for Admis- 
sion to Work Underground in Coal 
Mines, approved at 36th conference of 
I.L.O., 1148. 
Canada — 

output of coal per man day in underground 
mines in Canada (1952), 898. 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in mining in 1941 and 
1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 1951 
Census bulletin, 28. 

number of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 
1294, 1296. 

subsidies for coal mining industry sought 
by Maritime Marine Workers' Federa- 
tion, 1116. 

extracts from Hansard re gold miners' 
strike, 1745. 

full support for striking gold miners in 
Northern Ontario and Quebec given in 
emergency resolution passed at con- 
vention of C.C. of L., 1445, recom- 
mends establishment of national fuel 



LXXVI 



INDEX 



Mining— Con. 

Canada — Con. . 

policy, 538, urges development ot 
Canadian coal policy to provide full 
employment in coal mining industry, 
1443-44. 
recommendations of U.M.W. policy com- 
mittee, 1602. 

Alta.: regulations under Coal Mines Regula- 
tion Act re— installation and use of 
diesel locomotives in coal mines, 1654, 
use of milli-second delay action deton- 
ators, 289; striking gold miners in 
northern Ontario and Quebec sup- 
ported by Industrial Federation of 
Labour, 1755. 

B.C.: regulation under Metalliferous Mines 
Regulation Act, 290, 590; decline in 
fatal accidents in metal mining indus- 
try, 1737. 

N.B.: resolution adopted by Council of 
Labour re Minto coal fields, 1756; pro- 
vincial processing of minerals urged in 
resolution adopted by Federation of 
Labour, 1614. 

N.S.: amendments to Coal Mines Regula- 
tion Act, 1804. 

Sask.: regulations under Mines Regulation 
Act, 1186, 1651. 

N.W.T.: revised regulations under Mining 
Safety Ordinance, 889. 

United Kingdom — 
wage increase granted coal miners by State 

Coal Board, 363. 
fatalities in 1952, 1293. 

Poland — 

coal miners "members of the army," 1136. 

U.S.A.— 
amendments to Federal Coal Mine Safety 
Act, 1941 — government enforcement 
powers for prevention of major dis- 
asters in coal mines permit closing of 
unsafe mine, 101. 

Ministry of Labour and National Service 
(United Kingdom): 

summary of annual report for 1951, 675. 

Mitchell, James P., United States Secretary 
of Labour: 
appointment, 1433. 

Monographs : 

Canada — 
vocational training publications, 399. 

Moral Re-armament: 

Canada — 
convention proceedings of T. and L.C., 
1289. 



Mortgages : 

Canada — 
proposed measures to increase and broaden 
supply of mortgage money, 1421. 

Mosher, A. R., President, Canadian Congress 
of Labour: 

presidential address at 13th annual con- 
vention of C.C. of L., 1434. 

New Year's message, 1760. 

Labour Day message, 1128. 

on employment of older workers, 211. 

receives honorary Doctor of Law degree 
from St. Francis Xavier University, 
993. 

remarks at — presentation of Dominion 
legislative program, 539; annual con- 
vention of N.B. Council of Labour, 
1755; annual convention of I.W.W.A., 
515, 1738. 

Mothers' Allowances: 

Alta.— 
amendment to Mothers' Allowance Act, 
1802. 

Nfld.: amended provisions of Mothers' 
Allowances Act, 1347, 1803. 

N.S.: amendment to Mothers' Allowances 
Act, 1039, 1806. 

Ont.: amended regulations under Mothers' 
Allowances Act, 1519, 1646, 1816. 

P.E.I. : amendments to Mothers' Allowances 
Act, 1039, 1808. 

Sask.: revised Mothers' Allowance Regula- 
tions under Social Aid Act, 1350. 

Motor Mechanics: 

See Mechanics. 

Motor Vehicles: 

Canada — 
motor vehicle industry third largest manu- 
facturing industry, 1428. 
industrial expansion, 1948-1952, in trans- 
portation equipment industry, 513. 
Que.: amendment to Motor Vehicles Act re 
licensing of chauffeurs and motor 
mechanics, 1043. 

Municipal Corporations : 

Que.— 
legislation enacted in 1953, 1035. 

Municipal Workers: 

Canada — 
wages, hours and working conditions of 
employees in municipal government 
service — firefighters, police constables 
and civic labourers, 125. 

See also Firemen; Policemen. 



INDEX 



LXXVII 



Municipalities : 

Que. — 
revised regulations under municipal and 
school corporations Act, 1042. 

Musicians : 

U.S.A.— 
Supreme Court . . . holds union's demand 
for hiring of local band when travel- 
ling band engaged not violation of 
law, 735. 

Nash-Kelvinator Corporation : 

contract changes provide wage increases, 
809. 

National Advisory Committee on the Em- 
ployment of Older Men and Women 
(United Kingdom) : 

accidents do not increase with age — report 
of committee, 188. 

National Advisory Committee on the Re- 
habilitation of Disabled Persons: 

opening session, 367. 
fourth meeting, 1746. 
re-election of Dr. G. Fred McNally, as 

chairman, 365. 
N.F.B. film — Everybody's Handicapped — 

prepared by Council, Department of 

Labour, and N.E.S., 1595. 

National Advisory Council on Manpower: 

proceedings of meeting, 22. 

Arthur H. Brown appointed co-chairman 

of Council, 1731. 
< appointment of John W. Pickersgill, as 

co-chairman, 18. 
members of Council as of October, 1953, 

1731. 
extracts from Hansard re, 32. 
memorandum on The Problem of the 

Older Worker presented to Council by 

Director of Information, Department 

of Labour, 203. 

National Association of Manufacturers 

(U.S.A.) : 

opposes link of wages with productivity, 
363. 

recommends price cuts rather than wage 
increases as benefits of increased pro- 
ductivity, 660. 

National Building Code (1953): 

"A Code of Construction Safety Measures," 
992. 



National Catholic Textile Federation 
(C.C.C.L.) : 

seeks royal inquiry into textile industry, 
1264. 

National Council of the Norwegian Federa- 
tion of Trade Unions: 

wage increases in 1953 not disfavoured by 
Council, 364. 

National Defence: 

Canada — 
availability of manpower for defence 
production studied by National Ad- 
visory Council on Manpower, 22. 

National Employment Service: 

See Employment Service. 

National Federation of Chemical Industry 
Workers : 

chemical products unions set up new 
C.C.C.L. federation, 310. 

National Federation of Public Employees: 

compulsory arbitration rather than right to 
strike, sought by Federation, affiliate 
of T. and L.C., 1263. 

National Film Board: 

produces film — Everybody's Handicapped 
— prepared by Department of Labour, 
N.E.S., and National Advisory Coun- 
cil for the Rehabilitation of Disabled 
Persons, 1595. 

resolution adopted by Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce, 230. 

National Health Insurance: 

See Health Insurance. 

National Housing Act: 

amended provisions of Act, 1511. 

largest federal-provincial public housing 

project in Canada under way in 

Hamilton, Ontario, 190. 
See also Housing. 

National Income: 

See Income. 

National Labour Code: 

See Labour Code. 

National Labour Relations Board (U.S.A.) : 

average time required by Board to settle 
a case, 1519. 

false non-communist oath voids certifica- 
tion — N.L.R.B. cancels union's bar- 
gaining rights, 1606. 



INDEX 



National Labour Relations Board (U.S.A.) 

— Con. 

Board rules that union certified as exclu- 
sive bargaining agent of employees 
cannot charge non-members fee for 
processing grievances, 905. 

unions urged to make long-term contracts 
as bar to representation vote, by deci- 
sion of Board, 372. 

Board orders International Typographical 
Union to bargain in good faith, 995. 

steps up enforcement of non-communist 
provision of Taft-Hartley Act, 31. 

annual report of Board (1952), 1159. 

National Planning Association (U.S.A.) : 

causes of industrial peace — report of Asso- 
ciation on study of textile plant, 1141. 

collective bargaining under "Scanlon Plan" 
— case study into causes of industrial 
peace, 1138. 

issues review of manpower outlook in the 
U.S.A.— Manpower: The Nation's First 
Resource, 1497. 

National Policy: 

Canada — 
proceedings of national policy conference 
of United Steelworkers of America 
(C.I.O.-C.C. of L.), 1457. 

National Whitley Council: 

See Whitley Council. 

Natural Gas: 

See Gas. 

Needy Persons: 

Alta.— 
provisions of Hospitalization and Treat- 
ment Services Act, 1039. 
See also Handicapped Persons; Pensions. 

New Brunswick: 

See various subject headings. 

New Brunswick Council of Labour (C.C. of 
L.): 

annual convention, 1755. 

New Brunswick Federation of Labour: 

41st annual convention, 1611. 

New Canadians: 

See Citizenship. 

Newfoundland Federation of Labour (T. 
and L.C.) : 

17th convention, 1263. 

appointment of John H. Crann, vice- 
president, to Newfoundland Labour 
Relations Board, 516. 



New Year's Messages: 

Canada — 

Hon. Milton F. Gregg, Minister of Labour, 
1757. 

A. R. Mosher, President, C.C. of L., 1760. 

Percy R. Bengough, President, T. and L.C, 
1758. 

Gerard Picard, General President, C.C.C.L., 
1761. 

J. L. D. Ives, chairman, Dominion Joint 
Legislative Committee, Railway Bro- 
therhoods, 1762. 

New Zealand: 

ratification of I.L.O. Holidays with Pay 

Convention respecting agriculture, 

1625. 
increase in labour force and population, 

1607. 
unemployment statistics, 1603. 
re-election of F. P. Walsh as president of 

New Zealand Federation of Labour, 

1267. 

Newfoundland : 

See various subject headings. 

Newfoundland Federation of Fishermen: 

seeks affiliation with T. and L.C, 1734. 

Night Work: 

See Hours of Work. 

"No-raiding" Pacts: 

U.S.A.— 

A.F. of L.-CI.O. sign no-raiding pact, 660, 
990, 1424, 1617. 

"no-raiding" pact signed by International 
Association of Machinists (A.F. of L.) 
and United Rubber Workers (C.I.O.), 
1259. 

four-year-no-raiding pact renewed between 
U.A.W. and I.A.M, 989. 

resolution adopted at convention of Inter- 
national Woodworkers of America, 
1738. 

Non-ferrous Metal Products: 

Canada — 
number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in non-ferrous metal products indus- 
try, 222. 
number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in non-metallic mineral products in- 
dustry, 222. 

Ont.: effects of plant expansion on employ- 
ment (1948-53), 1006. 



INDEX 



LXXIX 



Non-residents : 

N.S.— 
provisions of Nova Scotia Labour Act re 
employment of non-residents, 1804. 

Northwest Territories : 

labour legislation enacted in 1951 and 
1952, 887. 

extension of Vocational Schools' Assistance 
Agreement, Vocational Training Agree- 
ment and Apprenticeship Agreement 
to N.W.T, 1751. 

Norway : 

wage increases in 1953 not disfavoured by 
National Council of the Norwegian 
Federation of Trade Unions, 364. 

Nova Scotia: 

See various subject headings. 

Nurses : 

Canada — 
number of nurses in public hospitals in 
1951, 1121. 

Alta.: Students Assistance Act provides 
financial assistance to student nurses, 
1801. 

B.C.: 5-day, 40-hour week and wage increase 
provided in agreement between Van- 
couver General Hospital and L. 180, 
Hospital Employees Federal Union 
(T. and L.C.), 54. 

Man.: provisions of Licensed Practical 
Nurses Act, 1334, 1656. 

N.B.: resolution adopted by N.B. Federation 
of Labour re student nurses, 1615. 

Nursing Assistants: 

Ont.— 
amended regulations under Nursing Act, 
1656. 

O'Brien, Tom, M.P., President, British Trades 
Union Congress: 
address at 85th annual conference of 
T.U.C., 1620. 

Occupational Diseases: 

B.C.— 

recommendations of Chief Justice Sloan re 
coverage of occupational diseases 
under Workmen's Compensation Act, 
556. 

Office Buildings: 

Ont.— 
amendments to Factory, Shop and Office 
Building Act, 1039, 1186. 



Office Workers: 

Canada — 

office employees' working conditions in 
manufacturing (1949-53), 1665. 

salaries of office workers in manufacturing 
industries in 1952, 38, 846. 

standard work week (including 40-hour 
week and 5-day week) in manufac- 
turing industries in 1952, 843. 

organization of white-collar workers in 
manufacturing industries, 33. 

C.C. of L. urges organization of office 
workers, 1446. 

U.S.A.— 

working conditions of office workers in 
manufacturing industries, 39. 

degree of unionization indicated in results 
of survey, 1607. 

office workers' earnings in New York state 
(1951-1952), 1605. 

Offices: 

Ont.— 
new provisions of Factory, Shop and Office 
Building Act, 1640. 

Oil: 

Canada — 

number of persons 14 years of age and 

over employed in oil wells in 1941 and 

1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 1951 

Census bulletin, 28. 

expansion in petroleum products industry 

creates new employment, 372. 
abolition of provincial tax on fuel oil re- 
quested by C.C.C.L, 1469. 
building of trans-Canada gas and oil pipe- 
lines urged by C.C. of L., 1456. 

Alta.: regulations under Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act re gas and oil wells, 588 ; 
concentrated drive by Oilworkers' 
International Union to organize oil 
workers, 1755. 

B.C.: Court of Appeal holds mechanic's 
lien under provincial Act not en- 
forceable against an interprovincial 
pipe line, 1337. 

Ont.: provisions of Oil Pipe Lines Act, 1645. 

Que: abolition of provincial tax on fuel oil 
requested by C.C.C.L., 1469. 

Sask.: regulations under Oil and Gas Con- 
servation Act, 591. 

Oil Workers' International Union: 

Canada — 
organizing rights at Edmonton petro- 
chemical plants given to O.W.I.U., at 
annual convention of C.C. of L., 1439. 



LXXX 



INDEX 



Old Age Assistance: 

Alta. — 

re certain recipients of government assist- 
ance and their dependants, 1800. 
See also Pensions. 

Old Age Security: 

See Pensions. 

Older Workers: 

Canada — 

shortage of trained young women workers 
forces industry to hire older women, 
812. 

national policy for employment of older 
workers urged by National Advisory 
Council on Manpower, 22. 

The Problem of the Older Worker— mem- 
orandum on Canada's ageing popula- 
tion presented to National Advisory 
Council on Manpower by Director of 
Information, Department of Labour, 
203. 

extracts from Hansard re employment age 
limit, 32. 

job counselling for older workers— address 
of Dr. W. G. Scott, adviser to N.E.S., 
1137. 

change in attitude to older worker urged 
by Hon. Paul Martin, Minister of 
National Health and Welfare, 1733. 

enforced retirement of older persons con- 
demned at conference of American 
Association of Medical Social Workers 
— corrective program recommended, 
1600. 

usefulness of workers based on skill, not 
age, 188. 
C.C. of L. recommends removal of restric- 
tions on employment of, 538. 
United Kingdom — 

accidents do not increase with age — report 
of National Advisory Committee on 
the Employment of Older Men and 
Women, 188. 
Belgium — 

results of survey on unemployment among 
older workers, 217. 
U.S.A.— 

House of School and Industry aids older 
women to rejoin labour force, 1600. 

number of railroad workers 65 years of 
age and over in 1951, 994. 

employment demand increases, 817. 

opportunity for continued work by able- 
bodied aged persons, recommended, 
188. 

few firms develop definite policies for 
utilizing older workers survey by 
American Management Association 
reveals, 1117. 



Older Workers — Con. 

U.S.A.— Con. 

work rather than retirement preferred by 
older workers — survey of N.Y. state 
Department of Labour, 664. 

survey of union members' attitudes to 
retirement, 665. 

re age limit for office workers in manu- 
facturing industries, 39. 

retirement ages may be extended — N.Y. 
Times, 189. 

One Day's Rest in Seven: 

Cuba — 
Cuba ratifies I.L.O. convention affecting 
weekly rest in industry, 1625. 
U.S.A.— 

act of 1909 providing one day's rest in 
seven for all workers in N.Y. state, 
1606. 

Ontario Federation of Labour (C.C. of L.) : 

second fair employment practices confer- 
ence held by Federation, 813. 

Ontario Federation of Public Employees: 

7th annual convention, 1121. 

Ontario Industrial Accident Prevention 
Associations : 

See Industrial Accident Prevention As- 
sociations of Ontario. 

Ontario Labour Relations Board: 

See Industrial Relations. 

Ontario Provincial Federation of Labour 
(T. and L.C.): 

annual convention, 1008. 

Operating Engineers: 

See Engineers. 

Operators : 

See Engine Operators. 

Orders in Council: 

P.C. 1953-502 (revised Vetcraft Shops 
Regulations), 1180. 

P.C. 1953-641 (pilotage by-laws West- 
minster Pilotage District, under 
Canada Shipping Act), 1342. 

P.C. 1953-680 (pilotage by-laws Halifax 
Pilotage District, under Canada Ship- 
ping Act), 1342. 

P.C. 1953-773 (pilotage by-laws Montreal 
Pilotage District, under* Canada Ship- 
ping Act), 1342. 

P.C. 1953-774 (Pilots' Pension Fund Regu- 
lations for Montreal Pilotage Dis- 
trict), 1343. 

P.C. 1953-950 (pilotage by-laws under 
Canada Shipping Act), 1342. 

P.C. 4713 (amendment to Department of 
Veterans Affairs Act re workmen's 
compensation benefits), 442. 



INDEX 



Overtime : 

Canada — 
premium rates for overtime paid to office 
workers in manufacturing (1949-53), 
1666. 
premium rates of plant employees in 
manufacturing industry (in 1939, 1950, 
1951 and 1953), 1530. 
provisions of collective agreements in 
manufacturing industries in effect in 
1952, 222. 
payment of overtime rates to civil ser- 
vants and postal employees, requested 
by T. and L.C., 1279. 

B.C.: overtime provisions in refrigeration 
trade, 590, in road transport industry, 
589 ; amendments to Male and Female 
Minimum Wage Acts, 1037, 1040. 

Man.: amendments to Hours and Condi- 
tions of Work Act re payment of 
overtime, 1333; amendment to Re- 
membrance Day Act, 1038. 

Nfld.: provisions of first order issued under 
Minimum Wage Act, 738. 

U.S.A.— 

overtime rates surveyed in 31 unionized 

and non-unionized companies, 1740. 
provisions of contract signed between 

Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company 

and United Rubber Workers of 

America (C.I.O.), 517. 

Pacific Fishermen and Allied Trades Union 
(S.I.U.): 

affiliation of Quathiaski, B.C. local of 
United Fishermen and Allied Work- 
ers' Union with S.I.U., 1425. 

Paihters and Decorators: 

Man.— 

Court of Appeal finds one 'hour adequate 
notice of dismissal for painter paid 
by week at hourly rate, 897. 
Que.: refrigeration company must pay 
painters, carpenters rates set in con- 
struction trade decree, 1810. 

Paper Products: 

Canada — 

number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in paper products industry, 222. 

See also Pulp and Paper Industry. 

Parity Committees: 

Que.— 
Superior Court finds Collective Agreement 
Act doesn't authorize parity com- 
mittee to sue for damages, 1340. 



Passenger Elevators: 

See Elevators. 

Payrolls : 

Canada — 

industrial employment, payrolls and aver- 
age weekly wages and salaries, 
September 1, 1953, as reported by D.B. 
of S., 1731. 

index as at November 1, 1952, 18. 

annual payroll of Canada's retail stores 
during 1941-51, 1518. 

Peace : 

Canada — 
resolution adopted at convention of T. 
and L.C., 1290. 
United Kingdom — 

early Four-Power peace talks urged by 
T.U.C., 1657. 

Pensions: 

United Kingdom and Australia approve 
reciprocal agreement on social service 
benefits, 523. 

1954 contract demands considered at 
policy conference of U.S.W.A., 1598. 
Canada — 

Federal-provincial breakdown of old age 
security pension statistics — number of 
pensioners and amount paid as of 
December, 1952; and in 1952, 665. 

increase in number of persons receiving 
old age assistance — contributions and 
payments since inception of Act, 369. 

The Blind Persons Act — number of per- 
sons receiving allowances under the 
Act as at June 30, 1953, 1261; as at 
September 30, 1952, 25; as at Decem- 
ber 31, 1952, 370. 

Old Age Assistance — payments for needy 
persons paid in 1952-53, 811; number 
of persons receiving assistance during 
first quarter of 1953, 657; as at June 
30, 1953, 1262; as at September 30, 
1953, 1736; as at September 30, 1952, 
25. 

Old Age Security — number of persons 
receiving payments, 1262; as at 
October 31, 1952, 25. 

office workers in manufacturing reporting 
pension plans (1949-53), 1667. 

provisions of Public Service Superannua- 
tion Act, 1511. 

Pilots' Pension Fund Regulations for 
Montreal Pilotage District under 
Canada Shipping Act, 1343. 

re group insurance costs and the hiring of 
older workers, 209. 

number of Canadian members of U.A.W. 
retired on pension since 1950, 235. 



LXXXII 



INDEX 



Pensions — Con. 

Canada — Con. 

extracts from Hansard re — pensions for 
disabled persons, 198; old age and 
blind pensions, 31, 833. 

"generous" pension plan won by Winnipeg 
clothing factory workers (I.L.G.W.U.), 
21. 

improved pension scheme sought by 
U.M.W. policy committee, 1602. 

recommendations of C.C.C.L. re old age 
and invalid pensions, 542. 

recommendations of R.T.B., 546. 

resolution adopted at National Policy 
Conference of U.S.W.A. seeks con- 
vertible pension plan, 1457. 

C.C. of L. — recommends increase in pen- 
sions and abolition of means test, 538; 
urges government to permit pensioners 
to receive pension wherever they wish 
to reside, 1454; seeks enactment of 
industrial pension plan, 1454; recom- 
mendation of Political Action Com- 
mittee, 361. 

T. and L.C. — resolutions adopted at con- 
vention, 1281; recommendations, 532. 
Alta.: regulations under Disabled Persons' 
Pensions Act, 1039, 1180, 1801; pro- 
visions of Hospitalization and Treat- 
ment Services Act, 1039; amended 
regulations under Supplementary Al- 
lowances Act re recipients of old age 
security pension, blind persons' allow- 
ance or old age assistance allowance, 
442; Widows' Pensions Regulations, 
1181; re certain recipients of govern- 
ment assistance and their dependants, 
1800; resolution adopted by Industrial 
Federation of Labour (C.C. of L.), 
1755; increase in old age pensions re- 
quested by Federation of Labour (T. 
and L.C), 1007. 
N.B.: monthly pension of $50 for disabled 
or infirm persons requested by N.B. 
Federation of Labour, 1615. 
Nfld.: new regulations under Blind Persons 

Allowances Act, 116, 1803. 
Ont.: number of disabled persons receiving 
pensions under Ontario Disabled Per- 
sons' Allowances Act, 1205. 
P.E.I. : amendment to Workmen's Compen- 
sation Act re public service superan- 
nuation, 1808. 
Sask.: amended regulations under Social 
Aid Act re blind persons and Indians, 
116; free hospital services to recipi- 
ents of old age assistance and depend- 
ants provided by new regulations 
under Health Services Act and 
Hospitalization Act, 293. 



Pensions — Con. 
N.W.T.: provisions of Old Age Assistance 
and Blind Persons Allowance Ordi- 
nance, 893. 
Yukon: provisions of Old Age Assistance 
and Blind Persons Allowance Ordi- 
nance, 894. 
Australia — 
United Kingdom and Australia approve 
reciprocal agreement on social service 
benefits, 523. 
United Kingdom — 
United Kingdom and Australia approve 
reciprocal agreement on social service 
benefits, 523. 
Puerto Rico — 

re-organized company must carry out pen- 
sions provisions of collective agree- 
ment, 23. 
U.S.A.— 

retirement income of $117.50 monthly — 
average benefit provided in collective 
bargaining pensions programs, 1266. 
payments for pensions and other welfare 

benefits by U.S. corporations, 1266. 
higher pensions granted in Ford — U.A.W. 

contract, 809. 
pension benefits paid by General Motors 

raised, 984. 
employer contributions to private pensions 

and welfare funds in 1951, 405. 
See also Older Workers; Retirement. 

Periodicals: 

See Films; Libraries. 

Permits : 

See Labour Permits. 

Personal Income: 

See Income. 

Personnel : 

Canada — 
women personnel experts meet at Per- 
sonnel Appraisal Institute at McGill 
University, 812. 

Petrillo, James C, President, American Feder- 
ation of Musicians: 
re-elected as president of American Feder- 
ation of Musicians of United States 
and Canada, 993. 

Petroleum : 

meeting (fourth session) of I.L.O. Petro- 
leum Industrial Committee — Canadian 
delegation, agenda, etc., 232. 
Canada — 

number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in petroleum and coal products in- 
dustry, 222. 



INDEX 



LXXX1II 



Petroleum — Con. 

expansion in petroleum industry creates 
new employment, 372. 
Sask.: new regulations under Boiler and 
Pressure Vessel Act covering safe 
handling of liquefied petroleum gas, 
1348. 

Phelan, V.C., Director, Canada Branch, Inter- 
national Labour Organization: 

extracts from address at convention of 
N.B. Federation of Labour, 1614. 

Picard, Gerard, General President, Canadian 
and Catholic Confederation of Labour: 

report at 32nd annual convention of 
C.C.C.L., 1463. 

Labour Day message, 1129. 

New Year's message, 1761. 

Pickersgill, John W., Clerk of the Privy 
Council: 
appointment as co-chairman of National 
Advisory Council on Manpower, 18. 

Picketing : 

Canada — 

resolution adopted at convention of Cana- 
dian Bar Association, 1426. 

appeal of Tony Poje rejected by Supreme 
Court of Canada, 657. 

union officer's appeal against conviction 
for defiance of anti-picketing injunc- 
tion, dismissed by Supreme Court of 
Canada, 1336. 

amendments to Criminal Code requested 
by C.C. of L., 537; R.T.B., 545; and 
T. and L.C., 533, 1278. 
B.C.: injunction against picketing to pro- 
hibit only picketing accompanied by 
intimidation, modified by Supreme 
Court, 1515; union officer's appeal 
against conviction for defiance of anti- 
picketing injunction dismissed by 
Supreme Court of Canada, 1336; 
appeal of Tony Poje rejected by 
Supreme Court of Canada, 657. 
U.S.A.— 

interference with railroad trains by pickets, 
forbidden in Arkansas, 1430. 

Pilotage By-laws: 

See Canada Shipping Act; Orders in 
Council. 

Pipelining: 

Sask.— 
amended regulations under Apprentice- 
ship and Tradesmen's Qualification 
Act, 1816. 



Pipe Lines: 

B.C.— 

Court of Appeal holds mechanic's lien 
under provincial Act not enforceable 
against an interprovincial pipe line, 
1337. 

See also Gas; Oil. 

Placements: 

Canada — 
placement of handicapped persons in first 
eight months of 1953, by Special 
Placements Division, N.E.S., 1424. 

Planning: 

See National Planning Association. 

Plant Construction: 

Canada — 
industrial expansion, 1948-1952, in trans- 
portation equipment industry, 513. 

Plant Employees: 

Canada — 

standard work week (including 40-hour 
week and 5-day week) in manufactur- 
ing industries in 1952, 838. 

plant employees' working conditions in 
Canadian manufacturing industry in 
1949, 1950, 1951 and 1953, 1529. 
U.S.A. — 

degree of unionization indicated in results 
of survey, 1607. 

Plant Expansion: 

Canada — 
effects of plant expansion on employment 

in Canada, 1948-53, 1431. 
plant expansion and employment oppor- 
tunities in manufacturing industries 
in 1952, 15. 
Ont.: effects of plant expansion on employ- 
ment, 1948-53, 1004. 

Plant Training: 

Canada — 
re in-plant training and older workers, 209. 

Plumbing : 

Alta.— 
regulations under Public Health Act, 1655. 

Ont.: enforcement of Plumbing Code under 
Public Health Act, 1347. 

Sask.: amended regulations under Appren- 
ticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification 
Act, 1816. 

Plywood : 

import of plywood panels from Japan 
condemned by International Wood- 
workers of America, 1738. 



LXXXIV 



INDEX 



Poje, Tony: 

union officer's appeal against conviction 
for defiance of anti-picketing injunc- 
tion dismissed by Supreme Court of 
Canada, 657, 1336. 

Poland: 

coal miners "members of the army", 1136. 

setting up of Polish section on interna- 
tional service of C.B.C. requested by 
C.C.C.L., 542. 

Police : 

Canada — 
wages, hours and working conditions of 
employees in municipal government 
service, 125-128. 

Alta.: provisions of Police Act, 1036, 1800; 
amendments to Labour Relations Act 
providing compulsory arbitration in 
disputes involving firemen and police- 
men, 1035. 

Ont.: death of Thomas McBurney, organ- 
izer and first president of Toronto 
Police Union, 989. 

Que.: agreement reached between Montreal 
civic administration and employees, 
1597. 

Sask.: amended provisions of City Act, 
1036; amended provisions of City Act 
and Fire Departments Platoon Act re 
compulsory arbitration of disputes 
between firemen and policemen, 1648; 
amendments to Labour Relations Act 
providing compulsory arbitration in 
disputes involving policemen and fire- 
men, 1035. 

Political Action: 

convention proceedings of International 
Woodworkers of America, 1738. 
Canada — 

report of Political Orientation Committee 
at convention of C.C.C.L., 1466. 

20-point program of Political Action Com- 
mittee of C.C. of L., 361; resolution 
adopted at convention, 1441. 

substitute resolution adopted at conven- 
tion of T. and L.C. 1275. 

convention proceedings of International 
Woodworkers of America 1738. 

resolution adopted at National Policy 
Conference of U.S.W.A. 1457. 
Que.: policy of Federation of Industrial 
Unions (C.C. of L.) 1010. 

U.S.A.— 

convention proceedings of International 
Woodworkers of America 1738. 



Population: 

Canada — 
population by age groups, Canada 1951, 

1303. 
increase in population during 1941-1951 

reported in D.B. of S. Census bulletin, 

28. 
estimated population in next 25 years, 28. 

New Zealand — 
increase in population and labour force, 
1607. 

U.S.A.- 
one in every twelve persons aged over 65, 
according to Bureau of the Census, 30. 

Postal Workers: 

Canada — 
resolutions adopted at convention of T. 
and L.C, 1279. 

Potteries : 

United Kingdom— 
mid-century report of Chief Factory 
Inspector compares working conditions 
in factories in 1951 with those of 1901, 
1310. 

Premium Rates: 

See Wages. 

Pressure Vessels: 

Alta.— 
administration of Boilers Act transferred 
to Department of Industries and 
Labour, 1802. 

N.B.: inspections in 1952, 1012. 

Nfld. : amended regulations under Boiler and 
Pressure Vessel Act, 1038, 1347, 1803. 

Ont.: proclamation of Boilers and Pressure 
Vessels Act, 1038, 1184, 1642. 

Sask.: new regulations under Boiler and 
Pressure Vessel Act covering safe 
handling of liquefied petroleum gas, 
1348. 

N.W.T.: regulations (Canadian Regulations 
for the Construction and Inspection 
of Boilers and Pressure Vessels) under 
Steam Boilers Ordinance, 1951, 891. 

Yukon: amended provisions of Steam Boil- 
ers Ordinance, 894. 

Prevailing Rate Employees: 

Canada — 
claims for compensation under Govern- 
ment Employees Compensation Act 
(1952-53), 1130. 
recommendations of T. and L.C, 534. 



INDEX 



LXXXV 



Price Control: 

Canada — 

recommandations of T. and L.C., 534. 
U.S.A.— 

removal of certain price ceilings, 367. 
suspension of controls recommended in 

memorandum by assistant director of 

price stabilization, 29. 

Prices : 

international comparison of retail food 
prices by I.L.O., 1739. 
Canada — 

monthly report on prices and the cost of 
living— 128, 303, 452, 600, 751, 912, 
1054, 1199, 1358, 

monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics, 5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256, 

statistics— 157, 333, 487, 629, 779, 947, 1085, 
1227, 1391, 

cost-of-living index discontinued — replaced 
by consumer price index, 1533. 

conversion of escalator clauses in wage 
contracts from use of cost-of-living 
index to consumer price index, 1533. 
B.C.: herring operations closed — price offers 
rejected by B.C. Fisheries Association 
and United Fishermen and Allied 
Workers' Union (T. and L.C.), 23. 
Que.: C.C.C.L. regional council plans 
monthly regional consumer price 
index, 661. 
U.S.A.— 

solutions re problem of converting escala- 
tor agreements to new consumer price 
index, 809. 

statistics re consumer price index, 913. 

consumer price index as at January 15, 
1953, 453. 
. price cuts rather than wage increase as 
benefits of increased- productivity 
recommended by National Association 
of Manufacturers, 660. 

contract changes between U.A.W. and 
Chrysler Corporation, 809. 

Prince Edward Island: 

See various subject headings. 

Printing and Publishing: 

Canada — 

number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in printing and publishing, 222. 

extracts from Hansard re printing of 
Canada Savings Bonds, 32. 

3 A.— 

establishment of Unitypo Inc. to compete 
with publishers where printers on 
strike, approved at convention of 
International Typographical Union 
(A.F. of L.-T. and L.C.), 1264. 



Printing Trades: 

Que.— 
Apprenticeship Commission of the Print- 
ing Trades of the City of Montreal 
has 452 apprentices — summary of an- 
nual report, 1424. 

Productivity: 

I.L.O. report on productivity, 1122. 

report of I.L.O. Building, Civil Engineer- 
ing and Public Works Committee, 
1765. 

I.L.O. meeting of experts of different 
nationalities to study methods of 
increasing productivity within the 
factory, 50. 

Canada — 
monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics, 5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256, 

plant employees in manufacturing industry 
receiving production or incentive 
bonus, 1530, 1531. 

industrial expansion, 1948-1952, in trans- 
portation equipment industry, 513. 

estimated increase in production in next 
25 years — extracts from address by 
Dr. O. J. Firestone, Economic Adviser, 
Department of Trade and Commerce, 

28. 

availability of manpower for defence pro- 
duction studied by National Advisory 
Council on Manpower, 22. 

plan to overcome slump in production of 
farm machinery submitted by steel 
and auto workers to federal govern- 
ment, 17. 

U.A.W. chiefs urge auto manufacturers to 
level off production in order to pre- 
vent unemployment, 810. 

Israel — Histadrut seeks to link wages to 
productivity, 364. 

U.S.A.— 

one-hour increase in average work week 
for production workers in manufactur- 
ing, 994. 

price cuts rather than wage increase as 
benefits of increased productivity 
recommended by National Association 
of Manufacturers, 660; opposed to 
link of wages with productivity, 363. 

Professional Defence : 

Canada — 
C.C.C.L. convention report on purpose and 
administration of Professional Defence 
Fund, 1466-67. 



INDEX 



Professional Personnel : 

Canada — 
scarcity of Canadian scientific and pro- 
fessional personnel indicated in survey 
conducted by Department of Labour, 
988. 
extracts from address by Minister of 
Labour at annual meeting of Profes- 
sional Institute of the Public Service, 
in Ottawa, 868. 
U.S.A.— 

scarcity of manpower with technical know- 
ledge and specialized skills, 988. 

Profit Sharing: 

Belgium — 
profit-sharing and joint management strike 
issues at machine shop plant, 688. 
U.S.A.— 
causes of industrial peace — report of 
National Planning Association on 
study of textile plant, 1141. 

Profits: 

U.S.A.— 

current labourt trends and labour prob- 
lems and their effect on profits, 405. 

Projectionists: 

Ont.— 
provisions of Theatres Act, 1646. 

Prosecutions : 

Ont.— 
violations of Factory, Shop and Office 
Building Act in 1950-51, 436. 

Protection of Workers: 

functions of National Labour Department 
defined in report of special committee 
of I.L.O., 1471. 

Public Buildings: 

Que.— 

provisions of Canadian Standards Associa- 
tion Safety Code for Passenger and 
Freight Elevators embodied under 
Industrial and Commercial Establish- 
ments Act and Public Building Safety 
Act, 1347. 

Public Employees: 

Canada — 
compulsory arbitration rather than right 
to strike, sought by National Federa- 
tion of Public Employees, 1263. 

Ont.: convention of Ontario Federation of 
Public Employees, 1121. 

Public Finance: 

See Finance. 



Public Health: 

See Health. 

Public Holidays: 

See Holidays. 

Public Ownership: 

Canada — 
public ownership of all telephone com- 
panies urged by T. and L.C., 1291. 
N.B.: approval voiced by A. R. Mosher, 
President, C.C. of L., at convention of 
N.B. Council of Labour, 1755. 
United Kingdom — 
Interim Report on Public Ownership 
adopted at conference of T.U.C., 1623. 

Public Service: 

Canada — 
provisions of Public Service Superannu- 
ation Act, 1511. 
extracts from address by Minister of 
Labour at annual meeting of Profes- 
sional Institute of the Public Service, 
in Ottawa, 868. 
P.E.I. : amendment to Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act re public service 
superannuation, 1808. 
United Kingdom — 
equal pay for equal work sought by 
T.U.C,. 1657. 

Public Service Superannuation Act: 

provisions, 1511. 

Public Utilities: 

Canada — 
number of workers affected by collective 

agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 

1294, 1299. 
P.E.I. : amended provisions of Trade Union 

Act, 1806. 

Public Works: 

4th session of I.L.O. Building, Civil 
Engineering and Public Works Com- 
mittee — studies guaranteed wages and 
increased productivity; other recom- 
mendations, 1764. 

Publications: 

Canada — 

publications in Library of Federal Depart- 
ment of Labour— 131, 306, 455, 603, 
754, 915, 1057, 1202, 1362, 

report on vocational training publications, 
1752. 

Arthur E. Hemming appointed Publica- 
tions Director of T. and L.C., 516. 

See also Monographs. 



INDEX 



LXXXVI! 



Publishing : 

See Printing and Publishing. 

Puerto Rico: 

re-organized company must carry out pen- 
sions provisions of collective agree- 
ment, 23. 

Pulp and Paper Industry: 

Canada — 
wages, hours and working conditions, 748. 
See also Paper Products. 

Quarries : 

Canada — 
number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in mining in 1941 and 
1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 1951 
Census bulletin, 28. 

Alta.: revised regulations under Quarries 
Regulation Act, 1656. 

B.C.: regulation under Metalliferous Mines 
Regulation Act re extension of work- 
ing hours in quarries and metallurgical 
works, 590. 

Quebec Federation of Industrial Unions 
(C.C. of L.) : 

formation, 17. 

first annual convention, 1010. 

Quebec Provincial Federation of Labour 
(T. and L.C.) : 

annual convention, 1009. 

Racial Discrimination: 

See Discrimination. 

Racketeering : 

U.S.A.— 

suspension of I.L.A. by A.F., L. for 
engaging in corrupt practices, 1267. 

racketeering on New York city water- 
front curbed by legislation enacted 
by states of New York and New 
Jersey, 1143. 

Radio: 

Canada — 

resolution adopted by T. and L.C. re free 
radio and television time for labour 
organizations, 1291. 

recommendation of Canadian Chamber of 
Commerce, 229. 
U.S.A.- 

jurisdiction over radio and electronic com- 
munications on certain ships won by 
American Radio Association (C.I.O.), 
1607. 



Raiding: 

B.C.— 
resolution adopted at convention of Feder- 
ation of Labour (C.C. of L.), 1008. 
Ont.: convention proceedings of Provincial 
Federation of Labour (T. and L.C), 
1008. 
U.S.A.— 

A.F. of L.-C.I.O. sign no-raiding pact, 660, 

990, 1424, 1617. 
four-year-no-raiding pact renewed between 

U.A.W. and I.A.M., 989. 
A.F. of L. and C.I.O. set up group to end 
"raiding", at meeting of committee to 
discuss labour unity, 660. 

Railway Brotherhoods: 

numbers of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1951, by affiliation, 1295. 

Railway Transportation Brotherhoods: 

Dominion legislative program, 544; reply 

of Prime Minister, 547. 
Labour Day message of Chairman, J. L. D. 

Ives, 1129; New Year's message, 1762. 

Railways : 

Canada — 
provisions of settlement reached between 

major railways and 17 non-operating 

railway unions, 19. 
railway strike averted — settlement reached 

between Brotherhood of Railroad 

Trainmen and Canada's railways, 187. 
increase in average annual earnings of 

steam railway employees since 1926, 

363. 
no wage increase sought by non-operating 

railway unions in 1953, 1422. 
industrial expansion, 1948-1952, in trans- 
portation equipment industry, 513. 
chairman of Joint Protective Board, 

C.B.R.E., appointed, 1427; correction, 

1619. 
chairmen of regional committees of Joint 

Protective Board, C.B.R.E., appointed, 

1427; correction, 1619. 
Dominion legislative program of R.T.B., 

544; reply of Prime Minister, 545. 
recommendations of R.T.B. re Railway 

Act, 545. 
extracts from Hansard re elimination of 

level crossings, 387; re railway lay-offs, 

1741. 
death of George Stone, former rail union 

leader, 1739. 
B.C.: recommendations of Chief Justice 

Sloan re coverage of student trainmen 

under Workmen's Compensation Act, 

554. 
N.S.: amendment to Nova Scotia Railways 

Act, not passed, 1806. 



LXXXVIII 



INDEX 



Railways— Con. 

Sask.: application of Workmen's Compensa- 
tion (Accident Fund) Act to members 
of International Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Engineers), 117; District 
Court, Saskatoon . . . holds it lacks 
jurisdiction to set aside settlement 
between injured trainmen and rail- 
way, 1044. 

United Kingdom — 
fatalities in 1952, 1293. 

u.s.a.- ; 

union shop and check-off agreement signed 
between several railroads and 17 co- 
operating railway labour organiza- 
tions in Eastern States, 19. 

six major railroads sign union shop agree- 
ments with non-operating rail unions, 
187. 

242 railroads sign union shop agreement, 
1117. 

rail union "will not condone" slowdowns, 
878. 

standard union shop contract signed by 
more railroads in Western United 
States, 371. 

unity bid by Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Firemen and Enginemen rejected by 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, 
1119. 

number of railroad workers 65 years of 
age and over in 1951, 994. 

interference with railroad trains by pickets, 
forbidden in Arkansas, 1430. 

70th anniversary of Brotherhood of Rail- 
road Trainmen, 1428. 

Rand Formula: 

Canada — 
provisions of collective agreement between 
Dupuis Freres, Montreal department 
store, and National Syndicate of 
Trade Employees (C.C.C.L.), 1140. 

Real Estate: 

number of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 
1294, 1300. 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in real estate in 1941 
and 1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 
1951 Census bulletin, 28. 

Reforestation : 

N.B.— 

resolution adopted by N.B. Federation of 
Labour, 1615. 

Refrigeration : 

B.C.— 
provisions of Order No. 22 under Mini- 
mum Wage Act governing workers in 
refrigeration trade, 590. 



Refugees : 

Canada — 
vocational training classes for immigrants 
opened in Montreal, 24. 

Rehabilitation : 

Canada — 

new federal health grant to provinces for 
rehabilitation of the disabled, 1510. 

extracts from address of Minister of 
Labour at meeting of Forest City 
Kiwanis Club, London, Ontario, 867. 

remarks at meeting of National Advisory 
Council on Manpower, 22. 

agreements for co-ordination of rehabili- 
tation services for disabled persons 
signed by federal government and 
governments of Saskatchewan, New 
Brunswick and Manitoba, 1596. 

N.F.B. film — Everybody's Handicapped — 
prepared by Department of Labour, 
N.E.S., and National Advisory Council 
for the Rehabilitation of the Dis- 
abled, 1595. 

T. and L.C. and C.C. of L. support re- 
habilitation of disabled persons, 522. 

opening session of National Advisory 
Committee on the Rehabilitation of 
Disabled Persons, 367 ; fourth meeting, 
1746. 

re-election of Dr. G. Fred McNally, as 
chairman of National Advisory Com- 
mittee on the Rehabilitation of Dis- 
abled Persons, 365. 
B.C.: report of Chief Justice Sloan on 
administration of Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act, 683. 
Man.: agreement for co-ordination of re- 
habilitation services for disabled 
persons signed by federal government 
and government of Manitoba, 1596; 
amendment to Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Act, 1034. 
N.B.: agreement for co-ordination of re- 
habilitation services for disabled per- 
sons signed by federal government and 
government of New Brunswick, 1596. 
Sask.: introduction of Rehabilitation Act 
forecast in Speech from the Throne, 
361; provisions of Rehabilitation Act, 
1039, 1651, 1657; agreement for co- 
ordination of rehabilitation services 
for disabled persons signed by federal 
government and government of 
Saskatchewan, 1596. 
United Kingdom- 
new type of industrial rehabilitation 
centre established — recommendation 
of Industrial Rehabilitation Develop- 
ment Committee, 1596. 



INDEX 



LXXXIX 



Rehabilitation — Con. 

United Kingdom — Con. 

company (Remploy Limited) established 
under provisions of Disabled Persons 
(Employment) Act, 1944, to provide 
work for disabled. 1748. 

Remembrance Day: 

Man — 
amendments to Remembrance Day Act, 
1038, 1333; amendment to Hours and 
Conditions of Work Act re payment 
of overtime, 1333. 

Remploy Limited: 

company established under provisions of 
Disabled Persons (Employment) Act, 
1944, to provide work for disabled, 
1748. 

Rent Control: 

N.B.— 

Municipal Rent Control Act, 1951, 
extended to April 30.. 1954, 1639. 

N.S.: Housing and Rentals Act, 1951, con- 
tinued in force, 1806. 

Que.: Act to promote conciliation between 
lessees and property holders . . . 
extended, 1043. 

Rentals: 

Canada — 
amended provisions of National Housing 
Act, 1511-12. 

Reporting Pay: 

Canada — 
reporting pay (guaranteed wage) in manu- 
facturing industry in 1951, 1532. 



Reports : 

•See Annual Reports 
headings. 



various subject 



Representation : 

See Labour Representation; Union Repre- 
sentation. 

Representation Elections : 

See Elections. 

Rescue Stations: 

See Mine Rescue Stations. 

Research : 

Canada- 
major needs in educational research, 1430. 
management and the problems of human 
relationships — research program estab- 
lished at McGill University, 995. 
establishment of Cassidy Research Pro- 
fessorship — fund for social work re- 
search established by University of 
Toronto, 995. 



Rest Periods: 

Cuba ratifies I.L.O. Convention concern- 
ing hours of work and rest periods, 
1625. 
Canada — 

rest periods reported in manufacturing 
industry (in 1949, 1950, 1951 and 
1953), 1531, 1532. 
Cuba — 

Cuba ratines I.L.O. convention concerning 
hours of work and rest periods, 1625. 

Retail Trade: 

Canada — 
provisions of collective agreement between 
Dupuis Freres, Montreal department 
store, and National Syndicate of 
Trade Employees (C.C.C.L.), 1140. 

Retail, Wholesale and Department Store 
Union (C.I.O.): 

U.S.A.— 

C.I.O. approves merger with Distributive, 
Processing and Office Workers of 
America, 815. 

Retirement : 

Canada — 

usefulness of workers based on skill, not 
age, 188. 

enforced retirement of older persons con- 
demned at conference of American 
Association of Medical Social Workers 
— corrective program recommended, 
1600. 

See also Older Workers; Pensions. 

Reuther, Walter P., President, Congress of 
Industrial Organizations: 

election, 21. 

re-election, 520. 

address at 13th annual convention of C.C. 
of L., 1447. 

extracts from address at convention of In- 
ternational Woodworkers of America, 
1738. 

receives honourary Doctor of Law degree 
from St. Francis Xavier University, 
993. 

Rice-Stix Dry Goods Company: 

guaranteed wage provisions of contract 
negotiated by International Brother- 
hood of Teamsters for, 659. 

Riffe, John V., Executive Vice-President, 
C.I.O.: 

appointment, 521. 



xc 



INDEX 



Right of Organization: 

U.S.A.— 

bases for Industrial Relations Act dis- 
cussed in address on current labour 
trends and labour problems, 407, 408. 

Right to Strike: 

See Strikes and Lockouts. 

Road Transport: 

B.C.— 

regulations under Hours of Work and 
Minimum Wage Acts, 589. 

Robinson Industries (Limited: 

activities of L.M.P.C., 100. 

Rocque, Rene, Organizer, C.C.C.L.: 
retirement, 814. 

Royal Commissions: 

establishment of Royal Enquiry Commis- 
sion to study textile industry requested 
by C.C.C.L., 1469. 

appointment of Royal Commission to 
investigate fishing industry, urged by 
T. and L.C., 1291. 

establishment of Royal Commission to 
study administration of government 
departments, urged by Canadian 
Chamber of Commerce, 229. 

Rubber Industry: 

Canada^- 

number of collective agreements and 
number of workers covered by agree- 
ments in rubber products industry, 
222. 

See also United Rubber Workers of 
America. 

Ryan, Joseph P., President, International 
Longshoremen's Association: 
resignation, 1732. 

Safety: 

Industrial health and safety session at 
convention of International Associa- 
tion of Governmental Labour Offi- 
cials, 1045. 

recommendation of I.L.O. Building, Civil 
Engineering and Public Works Com- 
mittee, 1766. 
Canada — 

"A Code for Construction Safety Meas- 
ures" — summary of section of National 
Building Code (1953), 992. 

Safety Code for the Woodworking 
Industry published by Canadian 
Association, 444. 



Safety — Con. 

Canada — Con. 
claims for compensation under Govern- 
ment Employees Compensation Act 
(1952-53), 1130. 
compulsory and binding arbitration in 
place of right to strike in disputes 
involving public health and safety, 
recommended by Canadian Bar As- 
sociation, 1426; criticism of T. and 
L.C., 1426. 
activities of joint employee-management 

safety committees, 1532. 
conference proceedings of I.A.P.A. of 

Ontario, 663. 
system of road markings to promote traffic 
safety recommended by Canadian 
Chamber of Commerce, 1754. 
extracts from Hansard re elimination of 
level crossings, 387. 

Alta.: regulations under Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act re gas and oil wells, 588 ; 
new sections covering use of milli- 
second delay action detonators added 
to regulations under Coal Mines 
Regulation Act, 289; Safety Code for 
the Woodworking Industry adopted 
as regulations under Act, 584; regula- 
tions under Factories Act — governing 
erection of derricks and cleaning, 
repairing . . . gas and oil well drilling 
plants, etc., 737, construction, operat- 
ion ... in grain elevotors, 586. 

N.B.: industrial safety research — annual 
report of Department of Labour 
(1952), 1012. 

Nfld.: amended provisions of Newfoundland 
Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act, 1038; 
appointment of inspectors under 
Workmen's Compensation Act re- 
quested by Federation of Labour (T. 
and L.C.), 1263. 

N.S.: amendments to Coal Mines Regula- 
tion Act, 1804. 

Ont.: proclamation of Boilers and Pressure 
Vessels Act, 1038; Elevators and Lifts 
Act — legislation enacted in 1953, 1038, 
1641 ; conference proceedings of 
I.A.P.A, 663. 

Que.: provisions of Canadian Standards 
Association Safety Code for Passenger 
and Freight Elevators embodied under 
Industrial and Commercial Establish- 
ments Act and Public Building Safety 
Act, 1347. 

Sask.: activities of Boilers, Factories and 
Elevators Branch, Department of 
Labour (1951), 692; regulations under 
The Gas Inspection and Licensing 
Act, 1038; revised regulations under 
Mines Regulations Act, 1186; regula- 
tions under Oil and Gas Conservation 
Act, 591. 



INDEX 



xci 



Safety — Con. 

N.W.T.: revised regulations under Mining 

Safety Ordinance, 889, 890. 
United Kingdom — 
mid-century report of Chief Factory 
Inspector compares working condi- 
tions in factories in 1951 with those of 
1901, 1304. 
U.S.A.— 
amendments to Federal Coal Mine Safety 
Act, 1941 — government enforcement 
powers for prevention of major dis- 
asters in coal mines permit closing of 
unsafe mine, 101. 
safety program initiated in New York 
state, 1606. 

St. Francis Xavier University: 

confers honorary LL.D. degrees on Percy 
Bengough, President, T. and L.C., 
A. R. Mosher, President, C.C. of L., 
and Walter Reuther, President, C.I.O., 
993. 

St. Laurent, Rt. Hon. Louis, Prime Minister 
of Canada: 

remarks on settlement of dispute between 
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen 
and Canada's railways, 187. 

announces proposed measures to increase 
and broaden supply of mortgage 
money, 1421. 

reply to legislative proposals of C.C.C.L., 
543, 544; to legislative memorandum 
of C.C. of L., 538 (see also pp. 531, 
532); of R.T.B., 547; of T. and L.C., 
535 (see also pp. 531, 532). 

St. Lawrence Seaway: 

'complete protection of Canadian shipping 
using waterway requested at confer- 
ence of C.C. of L. and C.C.C.L. ship- 
yard unions, 1458. 

union representation on board requested 
by C.C. of L., 1456. 

speedy and effective action urged by T. 
and L.C., 1291. 

resolution adopted by Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce, 230. 

Salaries : 

Canada — 

monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics, 5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256, 

average weekly wages and salaries in non- 
agricultural industries, 450. 

salaries of clerical employees in manu- 
facturing industries, 38. 

salaries of office workers in manufacturing 
industries in 1952, 846. 



Salaries — Con. 

Canada — Con. 
average weekly wages and salaries as at 
November 1, 1952, 18. 
Man.: regulations under Licensed Practical 

Nurses Act, 1656. 
Sask.: salaries and wage rates of employees 
in municipal government service — 
police constables, firefighters and civic 
labourers, 125. 
U.S.A.— 
salary and wage control suspended, 367. 
distribution of national wage and salary 

incomes, 1430. 
wage rates for office workers in manufac- 
turing industries, 39. 
office workers' earnings in New York 

state (1951-1952), 1605. 
See also Wages. 

Sales Tax: 

Canada — 
legislative memorandum of C.C. of L., 537. 
resolution adopted at convention of T. 
and L.C., 1281. 

Saskatchewan : 

See various subject headings. 

Saskatchewan Federation of Labour (T. and 
L.C.) : 

conference on formation of Federation, 



Saskatchewan Provincial Federation of 
Labour : 

1st annual convention, 1756. 

Savings Bonds: 

See Canada Savings Bonds. 

"Scanlon Plan": 

See Industrial Peace. 

Scholarships: 

Canada — 
"Post-Graduate Scholarships and Fellow- 
ships Open to Canadian Universities", 
published by D.B. of S., 665. 
Sask. — 
scholarships awarded by Regina Trades 
and Labour Council, 662. 

School Attendance: 

N.S.— 
regulations under Education Act, 1805. 

School Corporations: 

Que.— 
legislation enacted in 1953, 1035. 



XCII 



INDEX 



Schools : 

Canada — 
enrolment in schools, colleges, public 
secondary schools, evening classes, 
provincial correspondence courses and 
schools for blind and deaf persons, 
during 1949-51, 1429. 
school for "trade improvement" in aircraft 
industry opened by Northwest Indus- 
tries Ltd., Edmonton, 816. 
report on inquiry concerning compulsory 
legislation in various provinces, made 
to Apprenticeship Training Advisory 
Committee by Training Branch, 
Department of Labour, 26. 

Alta.: school for "trade improvement" in 
aircraft industry opened by Northwest 
Industries, Ltd., Edmonton, 816. 

Que.: revised regulations under municipal 
and school corporations Act, 1042. 

N.W.T.: regulations under School Ordi- 
nance, school attendance, 892. 

India — 
unemployment among educated class re- 
lieved by opening of primary schools, 
1456. 

U.S.A.— 
Secretary of Labour urges youth to finish 

schooling, 1262. 
See also Education; Legal Decisions; 
Vocational Schools. 

Scientific Personnel: 

Canada — 
scarcity of Canadian scientific and pro- 
fessional personnel indicated in survey 
conducted by Department of Labour, 
988. 
U.S.A.— 

scarcity of manpower with technical knowl- 
edge and specialized skills, 988. 

Scott, Dr. W. G., Adviser to National Em- 
ployment Service: 
address on job counselling for older work- 
ers, 1137. 

Seafarers' International Union: 

affiliation of Quathiaski, B.C. local of 
United Fishermen and Allied Workers' 
Union with S.I.U., 1425. 

strike of merchant seamen ends — provi- 
sions of agreement reached between 
S.I.U. and Shipping Federation of 
Canada, 1597. 

strike averted and settlement reached in 
dispute between S.I.U. and Colonial 
Steamships Limited, Canada Steam- 
ship Lines, N. M. Paterson and Sons, 
and Upper Lakes and St. Lawrence 
Transportation Co. Ltd., 1427. 

B.C. Gillnetters' Association merges with 
S.I.U., 1257. 



Seamen : 

Cuba ratifies I.L.O. convention governing 
minimum age for employment at sea, 
1625. 
Canada — 

strike of merchant seamen ends — provi- 
sions of agreement reached between 
S.I.U. and Shipping Federation of 
Canada, 1597. 

Certification of Ships' Cooks Regulations 
under Canada Shipping Act, 1342. 

strike averted and settlement reached 'in 
dispute between Seafarers' Interna- 
tional Union and Colonial Steamships 
Limited, Canada Steamship Lines, 
N. M. Paterson and Sons, and Upper 
Lakes and St. Lawrence Transporta- 
tion Co. Ltd., 1427. 

extracts from Hansard re Merchant Sea- 
men Compensation Act, 32, 525. 
United Kingdom — 

fatal accidents to seamen in 1952, 1293. 
Cuba — 

Cuba ratifies I.L.O., convention governing 
minimum age for employment at sea, 
1625. 

Seniority : 

Canada — 
seniority provisions in collective agree- 
ments in manufacturing, 222, 390. 

Service Stations: 

See Garage and Service Station Industry. 

Services : 

Canada — 

number of workers affected by collective- 
agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 
1294, 1300. 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in services group in 
1941 and 1951 as reported in D.B. of 
S. 1951 Census bulletin, 28. 

Severance Pay: 

Canada — 
holiday pay and severance pay — amend- 
ments to unemployment insurance 
benefit regulations, 1660. 

Shaw, Cecil M.: 

death of organizer for International 
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, 
366. 

Sheltered Workshops: 

Canada — 
inclusion of disabled veterans employed 
in Federal Government sheltered 
workshops under Government Em- 
ployees Compensation Act — revision 
of Vetcraft Shops Regulations, 1180. 



INDEX 



Shields, James P., Brotherhood of Locomo- 
tive Engineers: 
death of, 1118. 

Shifts: 

Canada — 
shift differentials in manufacturing indus- 
try (in 1949, 1950, 1951 and 1953), 
1530. 

Que.: survey of working conditions of 
young workers made by Jeunesse 
Ouvriere Catholique, 230, 294. 

Sask.: abolition of split shift requested by 
Provincial Federation of Labour, 1756. 

Shipbuilding: 

Canada — 
conference proceedings of C.C. of L. and 

C.C.C.L. shipyard unions, 1458. 
recommendations of C.C.C.L., 541-42. 
resolutions on maritime affairs adopted at 

convention of C.C. of L., 1454. 

Shipping: 

ratification of I.L.O. convention governing 
crew accommodation and food and 
catering on board ship, ratified by 
United Kingdom, 1625. 
Canada — 

strike averted and settlement reached in 
dispute between Seafarers' Interna- 
tional Union and Colonial Steamships 
Limited, Canada Steamship Lines, 
N. M. Paterson and Sons, and Upper 
Lakes and St. Lawrence Transporta- 
tion Co. Ltd., 1427. 

government subsidies only to shipping 
companies who build and repair ships 
in Canadian yards recommended at 
conference of C.C. of L. and C.C.C.L. 
shipyard unions, 1458. 
United Kingdom — 

ratification of I.L.O. Convention govern- 
ing crew accommodation and food and 
catering on board ship, 1625. 
U.S.A.— 

I.L.A. strike postponed — injunction im- 
poses truce in Eastern ports, 1605. 

Shipping Federation of Canada: 

strike of merchant seamen ends — provi- 
sions of agreement reached between 
S.I.U. and Shipping Federation of 
Canada, 1597. 

Ships' Cooks: 

See Seamen. 

Shoe Industry: 

Canada — 
annual wage stabilization plans in shoe 
industry, 1270. 



Shops: 

Alta.— 
amended provisions of City Act re clos- 
ing of shops, 1801. 

Man.: amendment to Shops Regulation Act, 
1334. 

Nfld.: amended provisions of Shops (Bar- 
bers' and Hairdressers') Closing Hour 
Act, St. John's, 1803; amended pro- 
visions of St. John's Shops Act re 
closing of shops, 1802. 

Ont.: legislation enacted in 1953 re employ- 
ment of women and young persons, 
1037; new provisions of Factory, Shop 
and Office Building Act, 1640, amend- 
ments to Act, 1039, 1186. 

Sask.: amendment to Village Act re closing 
by-laws, 1651. 

Sick Leave: 

Canada — 

sick leave provisions in manufacturing 
industry (in 1949, 1950, 1951 and 1953), 
1531, 1532, 1667. 

provisions of collective agreement between 
Dupuis Freres, Montreal department 
store, and National Syndicate of Trade 
Employees (C.C.C.L.), 1140. 

T. and L.C. support of cumulative sick 
leave plans in collective agreements, 
1291. 
N.B.: provisions of first collective agree- 
ment between government department 
and I.B.E.W., 371. 
Que.: provisions of collective agreement 
between Dupuis Freres, Montreal 
department store, and National Syn- 
dicate of Trade Employees (C.C.C.L.), 
1140. 

Sickness Insurance: 

Canada — 
group sickness and accident insurance 
plans manufacturing industry (in 1949, 
1950, 1951 and 1953), 1531, 1532. 

Silicosis: 

Sask,- 
new provisions of Mines Regulation Act, 

1187. 
See also Diseases, Industrial. 

Skaling, Hon. A. E., Minister of Labour 
(New Brunswick) : 
honourary life president of Local No. 1, 
Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers' 
International Union of America (A.F. 
of L.-T. and L.C), Saint John, N.B., 
18. 



INDEX 



Skilled Labour: 

Canada — 

skill and ability qualifications in seniority 
clauses in collective agreements in 
manufacturing, 391. 

availability of skilled and highly-skilled 
manpower studied at meeting of 
National Advisory Council on Man- 
power, 22. 

need for skilled workers in Canadian 
industry, stressed, 1259. 

lack of skilled labour acute — apprentice- 
ship training urged by C.P.R. officer, 
1423. 

CM .A. warns industry to train personnel 
now to assure adequate supply of 
skilled labour, 816. 

greater emphasis on apprenticeship urged 
by Presidents of T. and L.C. and 
C.M.A., 1423. 

bricklayers' apprentices to demonstrate 
skill in competition at C.N.E., 816. 
Israel — 

extensive vocational training program, 
1430. 
U.S.A.— 

recommendations of National Manpower 
Council in report presented to Presi- 
dent Eisenhower, 986. 

Sloan Report: 

results of inquiry into administration of 
Workmen's Compensation Act in 
British Columbia — summary of report 
of Chief Justice Sloan, 552-69; 676-86. 

Slowdowns : 

U.S.A.— 
rail union "will not condone" slowdowns, 
878. 

Slum Clearance: 

Canada — 
amended provisions of National Housing 
Act, 1511-12. 

Smelters : 

B.C.— 
report of Chief Justice Sloan on adminis- 
tration of Workmen's Compensation 
Act — submissions of I.U.M.M.S.W. re 
Trail smelter, etc., 685. 

Smith, C. Rhodes, Q.C., Chairman, Canada 
Labour Relations Board: 
appointment, 1257. 

Social Aid: 

Sask.— 

amended and revised regulations under 
Social Aid Act, 116, 1350. 



Social Security: 

functions of National Labour Department 

defined in report of special committee 

of I.L.O., 1471. 
I.L.O. Convention ratified by Sweden, 

1625. 
United Kingdom and Australia approve 

reciprocal agreement on social service 

benefits, 523. 

Canada — ■ 
recommendation of Political Action Com- 
mittee of C.C. of L., 361. 
recommendations of R.T.B., 546. 
recommendations of T. and L.C, 532. 
recommendation of Canadian Chamber of 
Commerce, 229. 

Alta.: provisions of Hospitalization and 
Treatment Services Act, 1039. 

Nfld.: resolutions adopted at 17th conven- 
tion of Newfoundland Federation of 
Labour (T. and L.C), 1263. 

Australia — 
United Kingdom and Australia approve 
reciprocal agreement on social service 
benefits, 523. 

United Kingdom — 

United Kingdom and Australia approve 
reciprocal agreement on social service 
service benefits, 523. 

Sweden — 
I.L.O. Convention ratified by Sweden, 1625. 

U.S.A.— 
higher pensions granted in Ford-U.A.W. 

contract, 809. 
See also Pensions. 

Social Welfare: 

Canada — 
establishment of Cassidy Research Profes- 
sorship — fund for social work research 
established by University of Toronto, 
995. 
United Kingdom — 

resolution adopted by T.U.C re Gowers 
report, 1657. 

Spain: 

establishment of employer-employee 
councils in certain commercial under- 
takings, 1735. 

Speech from the Throne: 

See Throne Speech. 

"Spread-the-Work": 

See Employment. 



INDEX 



X( v 



Stabilization : 

Canada — 
annual wage stabilization plans in shoe 
industry, 1270. 
U.S.A.— 
suspension of controls recommended in 
memorandum by assistant director of 
price stabilization, 29. 

' Staff Training: 

See Civil Service; Training. 

Stationary Enginemen and Firemen: 

Ont.— 
enactment of Operating Engineers Act, 
1039, 1643. 

Statistics: 

See various subject headings. 

Statistics, Dominion Bureau of: 

discontinues cost-of-living index — only 
consumer price index available, 1533. 

number of working wives during period 
1941-1951, as shown in 1951 Census 
Bulletin, 662. 

annual pa3Toll of Canada's retail stores 
during 1941-51, 1518. 

four-fifths of Canadian wage-earners re- 
ported earnings of less than $3,000 a 
year in 1951 Census, 190. 

industrial employment, payrolls and aver- 
- age weekly wages and salaries as at 
September 1, 1953, 1731; as at Novem- 
ber 1, 1952, 18. 

statistics re earnings of hourly-rated wage- 
earners in manufacturing industries, 
868. 

increase in average annual earnings of 
steam railway emplo3 r ees since 1926. 
363. 

labour force population by industry as re- 
ported in 1951 Census bulletin, 22, 28. 

personal income and expenditure in 1952, 
1013. 

labour income statistics, 985, 1732. 

labour income in November, 1952, breaks 
previous records, 364. 
irly health bill of average family — 
results of national sickness survey 
conducted by D.B. of S. and federal- 
provincial governments, 811. 

family expenditures for medical care — 
results of 1950-51 sickness survey, 1429. 

average cost per patient-day in Canadian 
general hospitals, 1457. 

increase in home building during first quar- 
ter of 1953, 810. 

housing statistics, 189, 365, 657, 983, 1260. 
1421. 

one-fifth of households overcrowded — 1951 
Census bulletin on housing, 983. 



Statistics, Dominion Bureau of — Con. 

Canadian business controlled elsewhere at 
close of 1951, 1798. 

review of manufacturing industries (1950), 
1428. 

employment and production in manufac- 
turing in 1952, 1818. 

imports of wool and cotton products and 
farm implements and machinery in 
August 1952 and 1953, 1734. 

output of coal per man day in under- 
ground mines in Canada (1952), 898. 

expenditures on formal education in 
Canada in 1950, 1429. 

"Post-Graduate Scholarships and Fellow- 
ships Open to Canadian Universities", 
665. 

Canada Year Book, 1952-53, 661. 

See also various subject headings. 

Statutory Holidays: 

See Holidays. 

Steam Boilers: 

See Boilers. 

Steam Locomotives : 

Canada — 
recommendation of R.T.B., 547. 

Steam Plants: 

N.B. 

resolution adopted by N.B. Federation of 
Labour, 1615. 

Steam Railways: 

See Railwa3 r s. 

Steel Industry : 

Canada — 

plan to overcome slump in production of 
farm machinery submitted by steel- 
workers to federal government, 17. 

plant expansion and emplo3 r ment oppor- 
tunities in 1952, 16. 

number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in iron and steel products industry, 
222. 

expansion of plant facilities in iron and 
steel products industry during 1948- 
53, 1432. 

U.S.W.A. to seek wage increases to re- 
establish parity with United States 
steel industry — proceedings of National 
Polic3' Conference, 1457. 

resolution adopted at convention of T. 
and L.C., 1291. 
Ont.: effects of plant expansion on employ- 
ment (1948-53), 1005. 



INDEX 



Steel Industry — Con. 
Sweden — 
agreement signed between trade unions 
and industry provide wage provisions 
in last year's contract continue in 
force for steel workers in 1953, 364. 
U.S.A.— 

higher wages in 1953 and guaranteed an- 
nual wage in 1954 sought by U.S.W.A., 
659. 

Stewart, P. A., Director, Canadian Federation 
of Agriculture : 
remarks on behalf of Federal-Provincial 
Farm Labour Conference, 46. 

Storage : 

Canada — 
number of workers affected by collective 

agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 

1294, 1299. 
number of persons 14 years of age and 

over employed in storage in 1941 and 

1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 1951 

Census bulletin, 28. 

Stores : 

See Department Stores; Retail Trade. 

Strikes and Lockouts: 

Canada — 

monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics. 5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256. 

statistics, 166, 342, 496, 638, 788, 956, 1094, 
1236, 1400, 

monthly summary of strikes and lockouts 
in Canada and other countries — 130, 
305, 454, 602, 753, 914, 1056, 1201, 1361, 

annual report on Strikes and Lockouts in 
Canada and Other Countries in 1952, 
1130. 

railway strike averted — settlement reached 
between Brotherhood of Railroad 
Trainmen and Canada's railways, 187. 

strike averted and settlement reached in 
dispute between Seafarers' Interna- 
tional Union and Colonial Steamships 
Limited, Canada Steamship Lines, 
N. M. Paterson and Sons, and Upper 
Lakes and St. Lawrence Transporta- 
tion Co. Ltd., 1427. 

strike of merchant seamen ends — provi- 
sions of agreement reached between 
S.I.U. and Shipping Federation of 
Canada, 1597. 

extracts from Hansard re gold miners' 
strike, 1745; re threatened grain 
handlers' strike at the Lakehead, 666. 

banning strikes as method of settling dis- 
putes urged by M.P. and farmers' 
spokesman, 23. 



Strikes and Lockouts — Coil. 

Canada — Con. 

compulsory and binding arbitration in 
place of right to strike in disputes 
involving public health and safety, 
recommended by Canadian Bar As- 
sociation, 1426; criticism of T. and 
L.C., 1426. 

Quebec court decision that upheld decerti- 
fication of Montreal teachers' union for 
participation in illegal strike, rejected 
by Supreme Court of Canada, 984. 

compulsory arbitration rather than right 
to strike, sought by National Federa- 
tion of Public Employees, 1263. 

C.C.C.L. — recommends settlement of 
charges pending against asbestos 
strikers. 1470; resolutions adopted at 
convention, 1459, 1467. 

C.C. of L. — resolution approved re em- 
ployment of strike-breakers, 1456; 
requests revision of Criminal Code, 
537; full support for striking gold 
miners in Northern Ontario and 
Quebec given in emergency resolution 
passed at convention, 1445; pledges 
support for dairy and packinghouse 
workers, 1445. 

R.T.B. — recommendations re Criminal 
Code, 545. 

T. and L.C. — requests amendments to 
Criminal Code, 533, 1278; resolution 
re Ontario trucking strike, 1290. 
Alta.: striking gold miners in northern 
Ontario and Quebec supported by 
Industrial Federation of Labour, 1755. 
Man. : blanket collective agreement cover- 
ing 11 local unions signed between 
Winnipeg Building Trades Council 
and Winnipeg Builders' Exchange, 811. 
N.B.: no-strike clause in provisions of first 
collective agreement between govern- 
ment department and I.B.E.W., 371 ; 
resolution adopted by N.B. Federa- 
tion of Labour, 1615. 
Ont.: strike called by I.W.A., employees of 
Durham Furniture Company, Limited, 
ends without settlement, 361; right to 
strike must be preserved — extracts 
from -address by vice-chairman of 
Labour Relations Board before Lon- 
don Chamber of Commerce, 815; 
resolution adopted at convention of 
T. and L.C. re Ontario trucking strike, 
1290. 
P.E.I. : amendments to Trade Union Act re 

strike action, 1806. 
Que.: Louiseville strike (Textile Workers' 
Syndicate, C.C.C.L.), ends with con- 
tract unsigned, 361; Quebec court 
decision that upheld decertification of 



INDEX 



XCV1I 



Strikes and Lockouts — Con. 

Que. — Con. 

Montreal teachers' union for partici- 
pation in illegal strike, rejected by 
Supreme Court of Canada, 984; 
settlement of charges pending against 
asbestos strikers recommended by 
C.C.C.L., 1470; recommendations of 
Provincial Federation of Labour (T. 
and L.C.), 1010. 

Sask.: annual report of Department of 
Labour (1951), 690. 

Belgium — 
profit-sharing and joint management strike 
issues at machine shop plant, 688. 
India — 
Government proposals for changes in in- 
dustrial relations legislation studied 
by Indian Labour Conference, 739. 

Ireland — 
world's longest strike ended, 876. 

Israel — 
number of strikes in 1952, 688. 

Japan — 

proposed labour law would curb electrical 
and coal strikes, 817. 
U.S.A.— 

I.L.A. strike postponed — injunction im- 
poses truce in Eastern ports, 1605. 

establishment of Unitypo Inc. to compete 
with publishers where printers on 
strike, approved at convention of 
International Typographical Union 
(A.F. of L.-T. and L.C.), 1264. 

end of 14-year-old strike at Peterson 
Chevrolet Company, 1365. 

rail union "will not condone" slowdowns — 
end of five-day strike on Pittsburgh 
railroad, 878. 

Classification by Industries 
Construction — buildings and structures — 

building trades workers, Hamilton, 790; 
Kimberley and Waneta, B.C., 790; 
Sarnia, 1097. 

carpenters, Comox, B.C., 790, 1403; Corn- 
wall, 344; Fort William, 344, 497, 639. 
789, 957; Fort William and Port 
Arthur, 1875; Kamloops, 1712; Lon- 
don, 1403, 1711; Moncton, 1711, 1873; 
Toronto, 1239; Windsor, 1875. 

electricians, apprentices and helpers, 
Sarnia, 1403. 

painters and decorators, Windsor, 1239. 

plumbers, pipefitters and apprentices, 
Edmonton, 169, 343. 

sheet metal workers, Fort William and 
Port Arthur, 344, 497. 

truck drivers, loco, B.C., 1239. 

94375—7 



Strikes and Lockouts — Con. 

Classification by Industries — Con. 
Construction — miscellaneous — 

pipe line installers, Kamloops, 958. 

power project drillers and powdermen, 
McArthur Falls, Manitoba, 498. 
Fishing and Trapping — 

salmon, fishermen, seiners, gillnetters, Brit- 
ish Columbia, 1238. 

Manufacturing — animal foods — 
meat packing plant workers, Vancouver, 

1874. 
packinghouse workers, Stratford, 790, 957, 
1095. 
Manufacturing — boots and shoes (leather) — 
shoe factory workers, Grand'Mere, 168, 
343; Preston, 1096, 1237, 1401, 1577, 
1709, 1871. 

Manufacturing — metal products — 
aero engine mechanics, Vancouver, 1578, 

1709. 
aluminum foundry moulders, Wallaceburg, 

498. 
aluminum ware factory workers, Wallace- 
burg, 790, 957, 1095, 1237, 1401. 
automotive stamping factory workers, 

Windsor, 1875. 
boiler factory workers, Napanee, 790. 
bus factory workers, Fort William, 1711. 
cigarette lighters factory workers, Toronto, 

1711. 
die casting factory workers, Hamilton, 

958. 
electrical apparatus factory workers, 

Guelph, 790; Hamilton, 1578; St. 

Catharines, 1578. 
foundry and machinery factory workers, 

Hamilton, 168. 
household appliances factory workers, 

Guelph, 958, 1095. 
jewellery factory workers, Vancouver, 344, 

497, 639, 789, 957, 1095, 1237, 1401. 
lighting fixtures factory workers, Toronto, 

958. 
machine and tool factory workers, Inger- 

soll, 1711. 
machinery factory workers, Toronto, 640. 
machinists and moulders, Vancouver, 640. 

789. 
metal factory workers, Toronto, 1711. 
metal furniture factory workers, Toronto. 

1239. 
motor vehicle factory workers, Toronto, 

1239, 1402; Windsor, 1875. 
refrigerator factory workers, Granby, 1402, 

1577. 
skate factory workers, Kitchener, 1097. 

1237, 1401, 1577, 1709, 1872. 
spring factory workers, Hamilton. 12. OQ , 

1402, 1577, 1700, 1879 



XCVIII 



INDEX 



Strikes and Lockouts — Con. 
Classification by Industries — Con. 

Manufacturing — metal products — Con. 
steel mill workers, Sault-Ste-Marie, 790; 

Winnipeg, 1711, 1872. 
steel mill workers, painters, Trenton, 498. 
steel tank factory workers, Brandon, 1875; 

Fort Erie, 1239. 
stove and refrigerator factory workers, 

Weston, 1875. 
structural steel factory workers, New Glas- 
gow, 167. 
structural steel fabricators, New Glasgow, 

1875. 
truck and trailer body factory workers, 

Weston and Swansea, 167. 
wire drawers, Hamilton, 958. 
zinc alloy die casting factory workers, 

Wallaceburg, 958, 1095, 1237, 1401, 

1577, 1709, 1872. 

Manufacturing — miscellaneous — 
power plant construction workers, Camp- 
bell River, B.C., 344. 
truck drivers, Hope, B.C., 1403. 

Manufacturing — miscellaneous wood prod- 
ucts — 
lumber mill workers, Interior British 

Columbia, 344, 1874; St. John's, Nfld., 

1711, 1872; South Nelson, N.B., 1097. 
plywood factory workers, St-Basile-de- 

Portneuf, 168; Vancouver, 1578. 
pre-fabricated housing factory workers, 

New Glasgow, 167. 
saw and lumber mill workers, Northern 

Interior British Columbia, 1711, 1872. 
saw and planing mill workers, Lumby, 

B.C., 1874. 
sawmill workers, Penticton, 1710, 1711, 

1872; Stellarton, 1874. 
wood furniture factory workers, Durham, 

167, 343, 497, 639. 
Manufacturing — non-metallic minerals, 

chemicals, etc. — 
chemical factory workers, Elmira, 958, 

1095; Niagara Falls, 1403, 1577. 
glass and plastic factory workers, Oshawa, 

1403. 
monument cutters, Toronto, 1097, 1238, 

1402. 

Manufacturing— -printing and publishing — 
lithographers, Oshawa, 344. 

Manufacturing — pulp, paper and paper 
products — 

building board factory workers, South 
Nelson, N.B., 1097, 1237. 

paper mill workers, Beauharnois and Crab- 
tree Mills, Que., 1710, 1872. 



Strikes and Lockouts — Con. 

Classification by Industries — Con. 

Manufacturing — rubber and its products — 
rubber and plastic products factory 

workers, Welland, 1874. 
rubber factory workers, Kitchener, 958. 
tire and rubber factory workers, Toronto, 

1710, 1871. 
tire builders, etc., Hamilton, 789. 
tire factory workers, Hamilton, 1096. 

Manufacturing — shipbuilding — 
machinists, welders, etc., Liverpool, 167. 

Manufacturing — textiles, clothing, etc. — 
boys' pants factory workers, Maskinonge, 

P.Q., 1402. 
clothing and hosiery factory workers, 
Montreal, 168, 343, 497, 639, 789, 957, 

1095, 1237. 

clothing factory workers, Quebec, 167; 

Sorel, 168. 
cotton factory workers, Hamilton, 167, 

343, 958; Welland, 1874. 
cotton, jute an'd paper bag factory 

workers, Vancouver, 958, 1095. 
cotton spinners and weavers, Granby, 1238. 
hat and cap factory workers, Amherst, 167. 
hosiery factory workers, Hanover, 1710, 

1872. 
knitting factory workers, Plessisville, P.Q., 

1096, 1237, 1401, 1577, 1709, 1871. 
rayon factory workers, Louiseville, 167, 

343, 497. 
silk dyers, printers and finishers, Joliette, 

497. 
sports clothes factory workers, Roxton 

Pond, P.Q., 1238, 1401. 
textile factory workers, Kitchener, 790. 
women's and children's clothing factory 

workers, Saskatoon, 1710, 1871. 
woollen cloth factory workers. Renfrew, 

168. 
yarns and carpet factory workers, Guelph, 

1238, 1401. 

Manufacturing — vegetable foods, etc. — 
flour, cereal and feed mill workers, Peter- 
borough and Saskatoon, 957, 1095, 
1237, 1401. 

flour, feed and seed mill workers, Vancou- 
ver, Victoria, Langley Prairie, Haney, 
Abbotsford, Mission, B.C., 1238. 

Mining — 

coal miners, Canmore, Alta., 1096; Drum- 
heller, 1402; Glace Bay, 1710; Mercoal, 
497; New Waterford, N.S., 639, 789; 
Sydney Mines, 1710; Thorburn, 168, 
640, 1096. 

coal miners, loaders, New Waterford, N.S., 
640, 789. 



INDEX 



XCIX 



Strikes and Lockouts — Con. 
Classification by Industries — Con. 
Mining — Con. 

copper miners and mill workers, Noranda, 
1874; Normetal, Que., 1874. 

copper refiners, Montreal, 167, 343, 497. 
639, 789. 

gold and copper miners and smelter 
workers, Noranda, 1578, 1709, 1871. 

gold and copper miners, mill and smelter 
workers, Noranda, 1873. 

gold and silver miners, mill and smelter 
workers, Timmins, 1710, 1871. 

gold miners and mill workers, Schumacher, 
1710, 1871, 1874; Timmins, 1873. 

gold miners, mill and smelter workers, 
Pamour, South Porcupine and Tim- 
mins, 1402, 1577, 1709, 1871. 

iron ore miners, Bell Island, Nfld., 640. 

silver and lead miners, Alice Arm, B.C., 

1096, 1237, 1401, 1577, 1709, 1871. 

Service — business and personal — 
garage workers, Courtenay, B.C., 640; 
Fort William and Port Arthur, 959, 
1096; Saint John, 640, 789, 957, 1096, 
1238; Winnipeg, 1097, 1238. 
hotel and beverage room employees, Bel- 
levue, Blairmore, Coleman, Alta., 1712, 
1873. 
valet service store workers, Oshawa, 498, 
639. 

Service — public administration — 

civic employees, Saanich, B.C., 1097, 1238. 
garbage collectors, Picton, 1712. 
hydro workers, Forest Hill, 1*875. 

Trade- 
coal handlers, Montreal, 498, 639. 
dairy workers and route salesmen, Niagara 

Falls, 790. 
grocery and snack bar clerks. Duncan, B.C., 

1097. 
hardware warehouse workers, Vancouver, 

1097, 1238. 

laboratory supplies warehousemen, Van- 
couver, 640. 

milk salesmen and dairy workers, Toronto, 
1712. 

mining and construction equipment ware- 
house workers, Port Arthur, 1875. 

mixed concrete truck drivers, Toronto, 
1239, 1402. 

retail store clerks, Bell Island. 169, 344. 

steel products warehousn workers, Van- 
couver, 168, 343. 

truck drivers and construction equipment 
warehouse workers, Chatham. 1875. 

variety store clerks, Weyburn, 959, 1096. 

wholesale drug warehouse workers, Van- 
couver, 1097. 



Strikes and Lockouts — Con. 

Classification by Industries- Con. 
Trade — Con. 

wholesale grocery warehouse workers, 

Penticton, 1578, 1710, 1873. 
wholesale grocery workers, Moncton, 344. 
wholesale produce warehouse workers, 

Vancouver, 1239, 1402, 1578, 1709, 1873. 
Transportation and Public Utilities — electric 

railways and local bus lines — 
bus drivers, Oshawa, 1403; Sydney, 168; 

Timmins, 790. 
bus drivers and garagemen, Hull, 959. 
Transportation and Public Utilities — miscel- 
laneous — 
grain elevator workers, New Westminster 

and Vancouver, 640, 789, 957, 1096. 
Transportation and Public Utilities — other 

local and highway — 
bus transport workers, Saskatchewan, 1239, 

1402. 
truck drivers, Windsor, 640. 
truck drivers and storage warehouse 

workers, Winnipeg, 1712. 
truck drivers, warehousemen and helpers, 

Southwestern Ontario, 1403, 1578; 

Windsor, 1097, 1239. 
truck mechanics, etc., Vancouver, 169, 343. 
Transportation and Public Utilities — water 

transport — 
seamen, Canadian Ports, 1712, 1873; 

Erieau, Ontario, 1403. 
stevedores, Toronto, 1403. 

Student Nurses: 

See Nurses. 

Students: 

Canada — 
placement of 1953 university graduates, 
1261. 

Student Aid Program — report of semi-annual 
Conference of Vocational Training 
Advisory Council, 398, 1752. 

Alta.: Students Assistance Act provides 
financial assistance to university stu- 
dents, teachers in training and student 
nurses, 1801. 

U.S.A.— 

recommendations of National Manpower 
Council in report presented to Presi- 
dent Eisenhower, 986. 

Subsidies: 

Canada — 

government subsidies only to shipping 
companies who build and repair ships 
in Canadian yards recommended at 
conference of C.C. of L. and C.C.C.L. 
shipyard unions, 1458. 

subsidies for coal mining industry sought 
by Maritime Marine Workers' Federa- 
tion, 1116, 



INDEX 



Subversive Activities: 

Canada — 
resolution adopted at convention of T. 

and L.C., 1275. 
See also Communism. 

Superannuation : 

Canada — 
provisions of Public Service Superannua- 
tion Act, 1511. 

P.E.I.: amendment to Workmen's Compen- 
sation Act re public service super- 
annuation, 1808. 

Superior Labour Councils: 

See Labour Councils. 

Supervisory Training: 

Canada — 
progress report of Assistant Director of 
Vocational Training, 1750. 

Supplementary Allowances : 

Alta.— 

amended regulations under Supplementary 
Allowances Act re recipients of old age 
security pension, blind persons' allow- 
ance or old age assistance allowance, 
442. 

See also Pensions. 

Sweden: 

state committee of enquiry recommends 
equal pay for equal work in Civil 
Service, 1115. 

agreement signed between trade unions 
and industry provide wage provisions 
in last year's contract continue in 
force for steel workers in 1953, 364. 

ratines I.L.O. Conventions governing 
social security and annual paid holi- 
day for agricultural workers, 1625. 

Swerdlow, Max, Organizing and Educational 
Director, Trades and Labour Congress 
of Canada: 
appointment. 516. 

Taft, Senator Robert A.: 

death of, 1122. 

Taft-Hartley Act (U.S.A.): 

Supreme Court .... holds typographical 
union's practice of bogus typesetting 
not a violation of Act, 734. 

N.L.R.B. steps up enforcement of non- 
communist provision of Act, 31. 

three-man board of inquiry set up under 
Act in I.L.A. dispute, 1605. 

A.F. of L. to settle for amendment rather 
than repeal of Act, 30. 

proceedings at convention of A.F. of L., 
1618. 



Taft-Hartley Act (U.S.A.)— Con. 

bases for Industrial Relations Act dis- 
cussed in address on current labour 
trends and labour problems, 407, 408. 

Take-home Pay: 

Canada — 
"progressive reduction" of work week with 
no reduction in take-home pay, sought 
by C.C. of L., 1446. 

Tariffs: 

Canada — 
National Catholic Textile Federation seeks 
royal inquiry into textile industry, 
1264. 

Task Force: 

U.S.A.— 

investigation of Communist influence in 
labour unions by special task force, 
1258. 

Taxation : 

Canada — 

abolition of provincial tax on fuel oil re- 
quested by C.C.C.L., 1469. 

legislative memorandum of C.C. of L., 537; 
resolutions adopted at annual conven- 
tion, 1452. 

recommendations of T. and L.C., 532; 
resolution adopted at convention, 1281. 

recommendations of Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce, 229, 1754. 
Que.: abolition of provincial tax on fuel oil 
requested by C.C.C.L., 1469. 

See also Income Tax. 

Teachers : 

Canada — 
major needs in educational research, 1430. 
number of teachers in 1950, 1429. 
Quebec court decision that upheld decer- 
tification of Montreal teachers' union 
for participation in illegal strike, 
rejected by Supreme Court of Canada, 
984. 
progress report of Assistant Director of 
Vocational Training re civilian teachers 
for armed services, 1751. 
Alta.: Students Assistance Act provides 
financial assistance to teachers in 
training, 1801. 
N.S. : amended provisions of Nova Scotia 

Teachers' Union Act, 1805. 
Ont.: one year in five as industrial workers 
recommended for vocational school 
teachers, 816. 






INDEX 



CI 



Teachers — Con. 
Que.: Quebec court decision that upheld 
decertification of Montreal teachers' 
union for participation in illegal strike, 
rejected by Supreme Court of Canada, 
984. 
Sask.: amendment to Teacher Tenure Act, 
1651. 
See also Legal Decisions. 

Teamsters : 

See International Brotherhood of Team- 
sters. 

Teamwork in Industry: 

Canada — 
activities of L.M.P.C.'s, 52, 236, 417, 573, 
696, 871, 1019, 1153, 1313, 

Technical Aid: 

technical aid answer to "discontent" — 
statement by Hugh Keenleyside, 
Director-General of U.N. Technical 
Assistance Administration, 27. 

Technical Assistance: 

report of committee at 121st session of 
I.L.O. Governing Body, 695. 
Canada — 

Canadian contribution to the Colombo 
Plan and United Nations Expanded 
Program of Technical Assistance, 402. 

trainees in Canada under Colombo Plan 
and U. N. agencies, 1736. 

Technical Co-operation : 

report on Technical Co-operation Scheme 
of the Colombo Plan, 400. 

Technical Education: 

Ont.— 
establishment of Provincial Institute of 
Trades— regulations under Vocational 
Education Act, 116. 

Technical Personnel: 

Canada — 

employment opportunities of technical 
personnel, 661. 

scarcity of Canadian scientific and pro- 
fessional personnel indicated in survey 
conducted by Department of Labour, 
988. 
U.S.A.- 

scarcity of manpower with technical know- 
ledge and specialized skills, 988. 

Technical Training: 

Canada — 
report of Supervisor of Technical Training 
at 19th semi-annual conference on 
vocational training, 396. 



Telephone : 

Canada — 
public ownership of all telephone com- 
panies urged by T. and L.C, 1291. 

Teletype Perforators: 

Canada — 
extracts from Hansard re, 389. 

Television: 

Canada — 

R.T.B. re-affirms support of public owner- 
ship and government control of, 547. 

resolution adopted by T. and L.C. re free 
radio and television time for labour 
organizations, 1291. 

recommendation of Canadian Chamber of 
Commerce, 229, 1754. 

Textile Industry: 

fourth session of Textile Industrial Com- 
mittee of I.L.O., 572, 693. 

I.L.O. studies problems of women textile 
workers, 235. 

number of members of C.I.O. textile 
unions transferred to A.F. of L. United 
Textile Workers of America, 24. 
Canada — 

C.I.O. textile workers present brief on 
unemployment in textile industry to 
Federal Cabinet, 1734. 

definition of "dumping" in Customs Act 
may require revision, 1603. 

imports of wool and cotton products in 
August 1952 and 1953, 1734. 

slowdown of textile imports urged by 
Assistant Canadian Director of Textile 
Workers Union of America, 1120. 

number of members of C.I.O. textile 
unions transferred to A.F. of L. United 
Textile Workers of America, 24. 

number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in textile products industry, 222. 

establishment of Royal Enquiry Commis- 
sion requested by C.C.C.L., 1264, 1469. 

C.C. of L. requests immediate conference 
of government, labour and industry to 
study serious unemployment situation, 
1443; other recommendation, 538. 
Ont.: Textile Workers' Union of America 
(C.C. of L.-CI.O.) defeats A.F. of L. 
rival United Textile Workers of 
America (A.F. of L.-T. and L.C.) in 
two Ontario plants, 369. 
Que.: Louiseville strike (Textile Workers' 
Syndicate, C.C.C.L.), ends with con- 
tract unsigned, 361; injunction pro- 
hibiting textile firm from changing 
work conditions while negotiating dis- 
solved by Court of Queen's Bench. 
Appeal side, 108. 



CII 



INDEX 



Textile Industry— Con. 
United Kingdom — 

Industrial Disputes Tribunal rejects claim 
for wage increase for cotton workers, 
363. 
U.S.A.— 
number of members of CI JO. textile 
unions transferred to A.F. of L. United 
Textile Workers of America, 24. 
causes of industrial peace — report of 
National Planning Association on 
study of textile plant, 1141. 
wage increases sought by textile workers 
in 1953, 362. 

Textile Workers' Union of America: 

Canada — 

C.I.O. textile workers present brief on 
unemployment in textile industry to 
Federal Cabinet, 1734. 
slowdown of textile imports urged by 
assistant Canadian Director, 1120. 
Ont.: defeats A.F. of L. rival, United Textile 
Workers of America, in two Ontario 
plants, 369. 
U.S.A.— 

death of Mariano Bishop, executive vice- 
president, 366. 

Theatres : 

Sask.— 

activities of Fire Commission and Theatres 
Branch, Department of Labour in 
1951, 692. 

Throne Speech : 

extracts from Hansard, 1741. 

Time-loss : 

Canada — 
time-loss through industrial disputes in 
1952 — annual report on strikes and 
lockouts in Canada and Other Coun- 
tries, 1130. 
Sask.: time-loss through strikes in 1951, 690. 
Israel — 

time-loss through strikes in 1952, 688. 

Tobacco Industry: 

Canada — 

number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in tobacco and tobacco products in- 
dustry, 222. 

wages and hours in tobacco, cigar and 
cigarette industrj^, 451. 

Tobin, Maurice J., former United States 
Secretary of Labour: 
death of, 1115. 



Tool Industry: 

See Machine Tool Industry. 

Trade: 

Canada — 
number of workers affected by collective 

agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 

1294, 1299. 
number of persons 14 years of age and 

over employed in trade in 1941 and 

1951 as reported in D.B. of S. 1951 

Census bulletin, 28. 
re-opening of trade with Eastern countries 

urged at conference of CC. of L. and 

C.C.C.L. shipyard unions,, 1458. 
definition of "dumping" in Customs Act 

may require revision, 1603. 
National Catholic Textile Federation seeks 

royal inquiry into textile industry, 

1264. 
recommendation of Political Action Com? 

mittee of C.C.. of L. re international 

trade, 361. 
resolution adopted at convention of T. 

and L.C, 1290. 

United Kingdom — 

East-West trade — conference proceedings 
of T.U.C, 1622. 

Trade and Commerce, Department of: 

estimated increase in production and 
population in next 25 years — extracts 
from address by Dr. O. J. Firestone, 
Economic Adviser, 28. 

Trade Disputes : 

See Industrial Disputes. 

Trade Marks Act: 

provisions, 1512. 

Trade Schools : 

Ont.— 
support of employers in training appren- 
tices urged by official of Department 
of Labour, 368. 

Trade Training: 

Canada — 

trade training for armed services — report 
of semi-annual conference of Voca- 
tional Training Advisory Council, 397. 
standardization of trades training and 
establishment of national apprentice- 
ship program, urged, 1423. 



INDEX 



cm 



Trade Union Membership: 

Canada — 

1953 reference to Labour Organization in 
Canada, 1953, 42nd edition, published 
by Department of Labour, 1294. 

few collective agreements in manufactur- 
ing industries, required union mem- 
bership as condition of employment, 
in 1952, 222. 

C.C.C.L. membership as at May 31, 1953, 
1468. 
Alta.: Industrial Federation of Labour of 

Alberta (C.C. of L.), 1755. 
United Kingdom — 

total union membership, 874. 

membership of T.U.C., 1621. 
Japan — 

report on labour union growth, 689. 
U.S.A.— 

membership as reported in directory of 
labour unions published by Depart- 
ment of Labour, 817. 

American Federation of Labour, 404, 817, 
1257. 

Congress of Industrial Organizations, 404, 
817. 

United Automobile Workers (C.I.O.), 817. 

United Steelworkers (C.I.O.), 817. 

Teamsters (A.F. of L.), 817. 

total membership in 1951, 404. 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America return to A.F. of 
' L., 1425. 

restrictions on compulsory union member- 
ship in certain states, 1430. 

Trade Unions: 

proceedings of third World Congress of 
I.C.F.T.U. held in Stockholm, Sweden, 
1123. 

report that rights of trade unions violated 
in Czechoslovakia adopted at 122nd 
session of I.L.O. Governing Body, 
1151. 

Histradrut, General Federation of Labour 
in Israel, affiliates with I.C.F.T.U., 995. 

formation of International Brotherhood of 
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, 
Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers — 
amalgamation of boilermakers' and 
blacksmiths' unions in Canada and 
U.S.A., 1118. 

65th anniversary of International Associa- 
tion of Machinists, 661. 

( lanada — 

organizing rights at Edmonton petro- 
chemical plants given to O.W.I.U., at 
annual convention of C.C. of L., 1439. 

death of George Stone, former rail union 
leader, 1739. 



Trade Unions — Con. 
Canada — Con. 

Joseph Morris elected president of B.C. 
district council of International Wood- 
workers of America, 993. 

death of three labour executives — Henry 
William Watts, editor of Vancouver 
Labour Statesman, Maurice Turgeon, 
secretary of Trucking Industry Parity 
Committee, Quebec, and Cecil M. 
Shaw, organizer for International 
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, 
Toronto, 366. 

N.B.: Local No. 1 of Bricklayers, Masons 
and Plasterers' Union, Saint John, 
N.B., names Hon. A. E. Skaling, 
Minister of Labour, honorary life 
president, 18. 

Ont.: death of Thomas McBurney, organizer 
and first president of Toronto Police 
Union, 989. 

P.E.I. : amended provisions of Trade Union 
Act, 292, 1347, 1806. 

Sask.: amended provisions of Trade Union 
Act, 1035, 1648; amendment to Trade 
Union Act requested by Provincial 
Federation of Labour, 1756. 
U.S.A.— 

compulsory unionism in certain states 

forbidden, 1430. 
repeal of law in North Dakota, requiring 

unions file financial reports, 1430. 
directory of labour unions published by 

Department of Labour, 817. 
economist assesses current labour trends 
and labour problems — 
union's role in the economy, philosophy 
and policies discussed in address by 
Prof. Sumner H. Slichter, of Harvard, 
404. 
See also: various subject headings. 

Trades : 

proceedings of 3rd meeting of Apprentice- 
ship Training Advisory Committee, 
865. 

trade analyses — proceedings of joint con- 
ference of Apprenticeship Training 
Advisory Committee and provincial 
Directors of Apprenticeship, 1608. 

preparation of trade analyses by Depart- 
ment of Labour, 399. 

progress report of Assistant Director of 
Vocational Training re trade training 
for armed services, 1750. 

report of Supervisor of Trade Training, 
C.V.T., 1752. 



CIV 



INDEX 



Trades — Con. 

second annual convention of Union Label 

Trades Department of T. and L.C., 

1291. 
specialized training program for "trade 

improvement" in aircraft industry by 

C.V.T. and Northwest Industries, 

Limited, Edmonton, 816. 

Alta. : new regulations under Licensing of 
Trades and Business Act, 115; welding 
designated as trade under Apprentice- 
ship Act, 1343; specialized training 
program for "trade improvement" in 
aircraft industry by C.V.T. and North- 
west Industries, Limited, Edmonton, 
816. 

B.C.: minimum wage for machinist trade 
under Male Minimum Wage Act, 1344. 

N.B.: administration of Trades Examina- 
tion Act during 1952, 1013. 

Nfld.: number of graduates in trade courses 
at vocational training school, 369. 

Ont.: establishment of Provincial Institute 
of Trades — regulations under Voca- 
tional Education Act, 116. 

Sask.: amended regulations under Appren- 
ticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification 
Act, 1816. 

N.W.T.: licensing of trades and businesses — 
amended provisions of Business 
Licence Ordinance, 892. 

Yukon: licensing of trades and businesses — 
provisions of Business Licence Ord- 
inance (1952), 894. 

Trades and Labour Congress of Canada: 

Dominion legislative program, 531; reply 
of Prime Minister, 535; (see also pp. 
531, 532.) 
80th anniversary, 515. 
President Percy R. Bengough — 

receives honorary Doctor of Law degree 
from St. Francis Xavier University, 
993; and from University of British 
Columbia, 1737. 

address at 68th annual convention, 1282. 

New Year's message, 1758. 

Labour Day message, 1126. 

election to executive board of Inter- 
American Regional Organization of 
Workers (O.R.I.T.), part of I.C.F.T.U, 
188. 

urges greater emphasis on apprentice- 
ship, 1423. 



Trades and Labour Congress of Canada — 

Con. 
Labour Unity — 

C.C. of L. willing to unite with T. and 
L.C. — remarks of A. R. Mosher, Presi- 
dent, C.C. of L., 515. 

T. and L.C— C.C. of L. unity unlikely— 
secretary-treasurer of T. and L.C, 660. 

formation of Joint Marine Council — all 
marine unions in T. and L.C, 515. 

conference on formation of Saskatche- 
wan Federation of Labour, 988. 

joint statement (T. and L. C. — C.C. of 
L.) on rehabilitation of disabled per- 
sons, 522. 

numbers of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1951, by affiliation, 1295. 

compulsory arbitration rather than right 
to strike, sought by National Federa- 
tion of Public Employees, 1263. 

extracts from address of Claude Jodoin, 
vice-president, at 36th session of Inter- 
national Labour Conference, 1017. 

Newfoundland Federation of Labour 
seeks affiliation with T. and L.C, 1734. 

local of United Fishermen and Allied 
Workers' Union, T. and L.C, secedes, 
and affiliates with Pacific Fishermen 
and Allied Trades Union, S.I.U., Cana- 
dian district, 1257, 1425. 

American Federation of Technical Engi- 
neers affiliates with T. and L.C, 1604. 

United Textile Workers of America 
(A.F. of L.— T. and L.C) defeated by 
C.I.O. rival, Textile Workers' Union 
of America (C.C of L— C.I.O.) , in 
two Ontario plants, 369. 

recommendations of Canadian Bar Asso- 
ciation criticized by T. and L.C, 1426. 

Arthur E. Hemming appointed Publica- 
tions Director, 516. 

Max Swerdlow appointed Organizing and 
Educational Director, 516. 

appointment of John H. Crann, vice- 
president of Newfoundland Federa- 
tion of Labour (T. and L.C) to New- 
foundland Labour Relations Board, 
516. 
annual conventions — 

68th annual convention, 1273. 

Union Label Trades Department, 1291. 

Alberta Federation of Labour, 1006. 

B.C. Trade Union Congress, 1616. 

Newfoundland Federation of Labour, 
1263. 

Ontario Provincial Federation of Labour, 
1008. 

Quebec Provincial Federation of Labour 
(T. and L.C), 1009. 



INDEX 



( v 



Trades and Labour Congress of Canada- 
Con. 
annual conventions — Con. 

Saskatchewan Provincial Federation of 

Labour, 1756. 
50th anniversary of Saint John Trades 
and Labour Council (T. and L.C.), 
370. 

Trades Union Congress: 

See British Trades Union Congress. 

Tradesmen : 

Altar- 
regulations under Tradesmen's Qualifica- 
tion Act, 587, 737. 

Sask.: annual report of Apprenticeship and 
Tradesmen's Qualification Branch, 
Department of Labour (1951), 691. 

Training: 

I.L.O. report on current problems of voca- 
tional guidance and. training for 
women, 413. 

training programs in Canada, under 
Colombo and United Nations plans, 
403. 
Canada — 

manpower problems in an expanding 
economy — discussion by Manpower 
Problems panel at annual meeting of 
C.M.A., 1002. 

training costs — proceedings of joint con- 
ference of Apprenticeship' Training 
Advisory Committee and provincial 
Directors of Apprenticeship, 1608. 

technical assistance trainees in Canada, 
under Colombo Plan and United 
Nations agencies, 1736. 

Government to continue training program 
for student draftsmen, 368. 
Man.: amendments to Apprenticeship Act, 
1344. 

See also Apprenticeship ; Defence Indus- 
tries; Handicapped Persons; Super- 
visory Training; Trade Schools; 
Trades; Vocational Training; Youth 
Employment and Training. 

Trainmen : 

See Railways. 

Transportation: 

Canada — 

number of workers affected by collective 
agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 
1294, 1299. 

number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in transportation equipment industry, 
222. 

94375—8 



Transportation — Con. 

Canada — Con. 

number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in transportation in 
1941 and 1951 as reported in D.B. of 
S. 1951 Census bulletin, 28. 

expansion of plant capacity in transporta- 
tion equipment industry, 1432. 

wage-rate changes in collective agreements, 
first 9 months, 1952, 220. 

deduction by workers of transportation 
expenses, for income tax purposes, 
requested by C.C.C.L., 1469. 
B.C.: regulations under Hours of Work and 
Minimum Wage Acts, 589. 
U.S.A.— 

birthdays of truck drivers paid holidays in 
Boston under provisions of new con- 
tract, 1474 . 

Transportation Equipment : 

Canada — 

industrial expansion, 1948-1952, in trans- 
portation equipment industry, 513. 

expansion of plant capacity in transporta- 
tion equipment industry, 1432. 

number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in transportation equipment industrv, 
222. 
Ont.: effects of plant expansion on employ- 
ment, 1948-53, 1005. 

Trapping : 

Canada — 
number of workers affected by collective 

agreements in 1946, 1950 and 1951, 

1296. 
number of persons 14 years of age and 

over employed in trapping in 1941 

and 1951, 28. 

Treatment Services: 

See Medical Services. 

Trucking: 

Canada — 
resolutions adopted at convention of T. 
and L.C, 1290, 1291. 

Ont.: resolution adopted at convention of 
T. and L.C. re Ontario trucking strike, 
1290. 

U.S.A.— 
birthdays of truck drivers paid holidays in 
Boston under provisions of new con- 
tract, 1474. 

Turgeon, Maurice: 

death of secretary of Trucking Industry 
Parity Committee, Quebec, 366. 



CVI 



INDEX 



Twentieth Century Fund: (U.S.A.): 

collective bargaining effective wage-setter 
— recommendations of special commit- 
tee of Twentieth Century Fund, 1312. 

annual increase in buying power of 
workers' wages forecast in study Em- 
ployment and Wages in the United 
States, 1429. 

Typography : 

U.S.A.— 
Supreme Court . . . holds typographical 
union's practice of bogus typesetting 
not a violation of Taft-Hartley Act, 
734. 

Underdeveloped Countries : 

Canadian contribution to the Colombo 
Plan and the United Nations Ex- 
panded Program of Technical Assist- 
ance, 402. 

report on Technical Co-operation Scheme 
of the Colombo Plan, 400. 

resolution adopted at meeting (fourth 
session) of I.L.O. Petroleum Indus- 
trial Committee, 234. 

Canada — 
resolution adopted at convention of C.C. 

of L., 1441. 
resolution adopted by Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce, 229. 

Unemployment : 

Canada — 

monthly tabular report on current statis- 
tics, 5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256, 

current labour market — monthly report on 
labour force survey conducted by D.B. 
of S., 1, 

C.I.O. textile workers present brief on 
unemployment in textile industry to 
Federal Cabinet, 1734. 

U.A.W. chiefs urge auto manufacturers to 
level off production in order to pre- 
vent unemployment, 810. 

Canadian Welfare Council advocates 
added aid to employable jobless, in 
brief submitted to Cabinet, 517. 

recommendations of C.C. of L., 1443-44. 
Ont.: amendments to Unemployment Relief 
Act forecast in Speech from the 
Throne, 361. 
New Zealand — 

statistics, 1603. 
United Kingdom — 

statistics, 1258. 

seasonal decline in employment during 
September, 1953, 1732. 



Unemployment — Con. 
Belgium — 
results of survey on unemployment among 
older workers, 217. 

India — 
unemployment among educated class re- 
lieved by opening of primary schools, 
1456. 

U.S.A.— 
statistics, 1258. 
unemployment at new post-war low, 30. 

Unemployment Insurance : 

United Kingdom and Australia approve 
reciprocal agreement on social service 
benefits, 523. 
Canada — 

monthly report on operation of Unem- 
ployment Insurance Act — 120, 298, 445, 
593, 741, 906, 1046, 1193, 1351, 

monthly tabular report on current sta- 
tistics, 5, 176, .350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 
1256, 

statistics, 154, 330, 482, 625, 776, 942, 1080, 
1223, 1388, 

supplementary benefit statistics, 446, 593, 
741, 906, 1047, 

insurance registrations, 121, 446, 593, 741, 
906, 1046, 1193, 1351, 

decisions of umpire under Unemployment 
Insurance Act, 118, 295, 446, 742, 907, 
1047, 1194, 1352, 

payment of benefits during illness, etc., 
provided by amendment to Act, 1116, 
1509, 

holiday pay and severance pay — amend- 
ments to unemployment insurance 
benefit regulations, 1660. 

annual report of U.I.C. for fiscal year 
ended March 31, 1952, 191. 

text of report of Unemployment Insurance 
Advisory Committee for 1952-53, 1819. 

extension of coverage to certain types of 
farm workers urged by National Ad- 
visory Council on Manpower, 22. 

extracts from Hansard re, 389, 524, 830. 

recommendations of C.C.C.L., 542, 1468. 

recommendations of C.C. of L., 361, 537, 
1451. 

R.T.B. recommends amendments to Act, 
546. 

recommendations of T. and L.C., 532, 1278. 
N.B.: amendment to Act re workmen's com- 
pensation requested by N. B, Federa- 
tion of Labour, 1615. 
Nfid.: coverage of all provincial government 
employees requested' by Newfound- 
land Federation of Labour, (T. and 
L.C.), 1263. 



INDEX 



Unemployment Insurance — Con. 
Ont.: payment of funds to workers idle 
because of illness proposed by T. and 
L.C president at convention of Pro- 
vincial Federation of Labour, 1009. 

Australia — 
United Kingdom and Australia approve 

reciprocal agreement on social service 

benefits, 523. 
United Kingdom — 
payment of unemployment benefit during 

trade disputes recommended by 

T.U.C., 1657. 
United Kingdom and Australia approve 

reciprocal agreement on social service 

benefits, 523. 
U.S.A.— 
woman who leaves employment because 

she does not receive equal pay for 

equal work, entitled to unemployment 

insurance benefit, 1122. 
adequacy of unemployment insurance 

benefits, studied, 1824. 
study of relationship between annual wage 

guarantees and unemployment com- 
pensation, 1262. 

Unemployment Insurance Advisory Commit- 
tee: 

text of report of Committee for 1952-53, 
1819. 

Unemployment Insurance Commission : 

establishment of L.M.P.C.'s in the U.I.C. 
requested by T. and L.C, 1279. 

Hon. Milton F. Gregg, Minister of Labour, 
receives Citation of Merit from Inter- 
national Association of Personnel in 
Employment Security, 990-91. 

annual report of U.I.C. for fiscal year 
ended March 31, 1952, 191. 

Unfair Competition Act (1932): 

replaced by Trade Marks Act, 1512. 

Unfair Labour Practices: 

Ont.— 

second fair employment practices confer- 
ence held by Ontario Federation of 
Labour (C.C of L.), 813. 
U.S.A.— 

anti-discrimination bill introduced in Sen- 
ate, 813. 

membership of Government Contracts 
Committee appointed to prevent dis- 
crimination in employment by com- 
panies holding federal government 
contracts, 1427. 

See also Fair Employment Practices. 

94375— 8£ 



Union Dues: 

Canada — 

compulsory check-off of union dues pro- 
vided under terms of settlement 
reached in dispute between major rail- 
ways and 17 non-operating railway 
unions, 19. 

private member's Bill to amend I. R.D.I. 
Act, not passed, 1514. 

monthly dues increased by C.C.C.L., at 
annual convention, 1459; convention 
report on purpose and administration 
of professional defence fund, 1466-67. 

recommendations of C.C. of L., 361, 537, 
538. 

amendment to I.R.D.I. Act recommended 
by T. and L.C, 533. 

B.C.: provisions of first long-term contract 
in logging industry signed between 
I.W.A. and Western Plywoods (Cari- 
boo) Limited, 814. 

N.B.: provisions for first collective agree- 
ment between government department 
and I.B.E.W., 371. 

N.S.: amendment to Trade Union Act re 
check-off, 1804. 

Ont. : permission to sue company for union 
dues deducted from employees' wages 
granted U.S.W.A. by Labour Rela- 
tions Board, 23. 

Union Elections: 

U.S.A.— 

procedures for supervised union representa- 
tion elections . . . investigation of 
complaints, established in North 
Dakota and Oregon, 1430. 

Union Labels: 

Canada — 
second annual convention of Union Label 
Trades Department of T. and L.C, 
1291. 

Union Membership: 

See Trade Union Membership. 

Union Organization: 

See Labour Organization. 

Union Raiding: 

See "No-raiding" Pacts; Raiding. 

Union Recognition: 

Canada — 
resolution adopted by C.C. of L., 1456. 



CVIII 



INDEX 



Union Representation: 

Canada — 

union representation on St. Lawrence Sea- 
way board requested by C.C. of L., 
1456. 
U.S.A.— 

unions urged to make long-term contracts 
as bar to representation vote, by deci- 
sion of N.L.R.B., 372. » 

procedures for supervised union representa- 
tion elections . . . investigation of com- 
plaints, established in North Dakota 
and Oregon, 1430. 

Union Security : 

Canada — 

provisions of agreements in manufacturing- 
industries in 1952, 225. 
recommendation of C.C.C.L., 1469. 

B.C.: provisions of first long-term contract 
in logging industry signed between 
I.W.A. and Western Plywoods (Cari- 
boo) Limited, 814. 

Que.: recommendation of C.C.C.L., 1469. 

U.S.A.— 

percentage of union contracts containing 

union security clauses, 993. 
union shop coverage in 1951, 405. 

Union Shop : 

Canada — 
provisions of collective agreements in 
manufacturing industries in effect in 
1952, 222, 225. 

N.B.: provisions of first collective agree- 
ment between government department 
and I.B.E.W., 371. 

U.S.A.— 

union shop and check-off agreement signed 
between several railroads and 17 co- 
operating railway labour organizations 
in Eastern States, 19. 

six major railroads sign union shop agree- 
ments with non-operating rail unions, 
187. 

standard union shop contract signed by 
more railroads in Western United 
States, 371. 

percentage of union contracts containing 
union shop clauses, 993. 

union shop coverage in 1951, 405. 

Unionization : 

See Labour Organization; Trade Unions. 



United Automobile Workers: 

convention proceedings, 658. 

members of Guaranteed Wage Public 

Advisory Committee, 658. 
four-year-no-raiding pact renewed between 

U.A.W. and I.A.W., 989. 
Walter Reuther re-elected as president of 

the United Automobile Workers, 520. 
Canada — 
U.A.W. chiefs urge auto manufacturers to 

level off production in order to prevent 

unemployment, 810. 
apprenticeship plan devised by union's 

skilled trades council, 519. 
number of Canadian members retired on 

pension since 1950, 235. 
U.S.A.— 

election of president Walter P. Reuther, 

as president of the C.I.O., 21. 
pension benefits paid by General Motors 

raised, 984. 
trade union membership, 817. 
contract changes between U.A.W. and 

Chrysler Corporation, 809. 
higher pensions granted in Ford — U.A.W. 

contract, 809. 
revision of U.A.W.'s escalator contracts 

accepted by General Motors Corpora- 
tion and Ford Motor Company, 809. 
guaranteed annual wage plan proposed 

by U.A.W., opposed by Ford Motor 

Company spokesman, 1599. 
convention calls for guaranteed annual 

wage in 1955, 658. 

United Brewery Workers of America 

(C.I.O.) : 

U.S.A.— 

seven locals join brewer jr division of Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters 
(A.F. of L.), 1120. 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters: 

U.S.A.— 

re secession from A.F. of L., 1258. 
return to membership in A.F. of L., 1425. 
death of W. L. Hutcheson, former presi- 
dent, 1595. 
B.C.: annual convention of provincial coun- 
cil — proposal to seek 6-hour day, 30- 
hour week rejected; seeks "fringe" 
benefits, holiday pay, etc., 23. 

United Fishermen and Allied Workers' 
Union : 

suspension by T. and L.C., 1257. 

herring operations closed — union's proposal 
rejected by B.C. Fisheries Associa- 
tion, 23. 

Quathiaski, B.C. local secedes and affiliates 
with Pacific Fishermen and Allied 
Trades Union, SIXT., Canadian dis- 
trict, 1425. 



INDEX 



United Kingdom: 

See various subject headings. 

United Mine Workers of America 
(C.C. of L.): 
Canada — 
U.M.W. to vote third time on no-increase 
contract — other recommendations of 
union's policy committee, 1602. 

United Nations: 

technical assistance trainees in Canada 
under Colombo Plan and U.N. agen- 
cies, 1736. 

report of United Nations — International 
Labour Organization committee on 
forced labour, 1131. 

adoption of World Calendar considered by 
Economic and Social Council of 
United Nations, 1737. 

technical aid answer to "discontent"' — state- 
ment by Hugh Keenleyside, Director- 
General of U.N. Technical Assistance 
Administration, 27. 

Canada — 
resolution adopted by Canadian Chamber 
of Commerce re underdeveloped coun- 
tries, 229. 
Canadian contribution to the Colombo 
- Plan and United Nations Expanded 
Program of Technical Assistance, 402. 

United Packinghouse Workers of America 
(C.I.O.) : 

joint action in wage negotiations and 
organizing campaigns by Packinghouse 
Workers and Amalgamated Meat 
Cutters and Butcher Workmen (A.F. 
of L.), 1119. 



United Steelworkers of America: 

seek higher wages in 1953 and guaranteed 

annual wage in 1954, 659. 

appointment of David J. McDonald, 
president. 29, 521. 

1954 contract demands considered at policy 
conference, 1598. 
Canada — 

plan to overcome slump in production of 
farm machinery submitted by steel 
and auto workers to federal govern- 
ment, 17. 

proceedings of national policy conference, 
1457. 

urges unionization of white-collar workers, 
1457. 

appointment of Jack Williams as Publicity 
Director of Canadian Branch, 992. 

appointment of Murray Cotterill as per- 
sonal representative in Western Canada 
of C. H. Millard, Canadian Director, 
992. 

retirement of John Mitchell, Director, Dis- 
trict 6, U.S.W.A. (C.I.O .-C.C.L.), 993. 

Ont.: permission to sue company for union 
dues deducted from employees' wages 
granted by Labour Relations Board, 
23. 

U.S.A.— 

trade union membership 817. 

United Textile Workers of America: 

Canada — 
resignation of Sam Baron, Canadian 

Director, 365. 
Ont.: defeated by C.I.O. rival, Textile 

Workers' Union of America, in two 

Ontario plants, 369. 

Unity: 

See Labour Unity. 



United Rubber Workers (C.I.O.) : 

"no-raiding" pact signed by United Rubber 
Workers and International Association 
of Machinists (A.F. of L.), 1259. 

seek 20-cents-per-hour wage increase, 659. 
Canada — ■ 

Canadian rubber workers seek equal pay 
to United States, 659. 

U.S.A.- 

agreement signed between Goodyear Tire 
and Rubber Company and U.R.W.A., 
517. 

United States: 

See various subject headings. 



Unitypo Inc. : 

establishment approved at convention of 
International Typographical Union 
(A.F. of L.-T. and L.C.), 1264. 

Universities : 

Canada — 

extracts from address by Minister of 
Labour at annual meeting of Profes- 
sional Institute of the Public Service, 
in Ottawa, 868. 

1953 employment prospects for university 
graduates and undergraduates. 520, 
661, 1261. 

enrolment and expenditures during 1949- 
51, 1429. 



INDEX 



Universities — Con. 
Canada — Con. 

increased registrations at universities in- 
dicate shortage of engineers may be 
relieved in few years, 520. 

increase in college and high school attend- 
ance since 1921, 520. 

Labour Department — University Research 
Committee study applications for re- 
search grants, 657. 
Alta.: Students Assistance Act provides 
financial assistance to university stu- 
dents, teachers in training and student 
nurses, 1801. 
U.S.A.— 

recommendations of National Manpower 
Council in report presented to Presi- 
dent Eisenhower, 986. 

See also Laval University, McGill Univer- 
sity. 

University of Toronto: 

establishment of Cassidy Research Profes- 
sorship — fund for social work research 
established by University, 995. 

Vacations with Pay: 

majority of Governments favour I.L.O. 
Recommendation on Holidays with 
Pay, 572. 

I.L.O. convention providing annual paid 
holiday for agricultural workers rati- 
fied by Sweden, 1625. 

New Zealand ratifies I.L.O. Holidays with 
Pay Convention respecting agricul- 
ture, 1625. 
Canada — 

vacations with pay for office workers in 
manufacturing (1949-53), 1666, 1667. 

vacations with pay in manufacturing in- 
dustry (in 1949, 1950, 1951 and 1953). 
1530, 1531. 

provisions of collective agreements in 
manufacturing industries in effect in 
1952, 222. 

provisions of collective agreement between 
Dupuis Freres, Montreal department 
store, and National Syndicate of Trade 
Employees (C.C.C.L.), 1140. 

holiday pay and severance pay — amend- 
ments to unemployment insurance 
benefit regulations, 1660. 

resolution adopted by C.C.C.L. re Domin- 
ion Day, 1469. 

recommendation of Political Action Com- 
mittee of C.C. of L., 361. 

T. and L.C. recommendations, 533, 1291. 
B.C.: annual convention of United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners — pro- 
posal to seek 6-hour day, 30-hour week 
rejected; seeks "fringe" benefits, holi- 
day pay, etc., 23. 



Vacations with Pay — Con. 

Man.: amendment to Act re vacation stamp 
book, 1334. 

N.B.: resolution adopted by Council of 
Labour, 1756; holidays with pay re- 
quested by N.B. Federation of Labour 
1615. 

Ont. : regulations under Hours of Work and 
Vacation With Pay Act re vacation- 
with-pay credit, 738. 

Que.: survey of working conditions of young 
workers made by Jeunesse Ouvriere 
Catholique, 230, 294; Court of Queen's 
Bench, Appeal Side . . . finds em- 
ployees not entitled to pay for "paid" 
holidays under a decree if they fall 
on Sunday, 732; provisions of collec- 
tive agreement between Dupuis Freres, 
Montreal department store, and Na- 
tional Syndicate of Trade Employees 
(C.C.C.L.), 1140. 

Sweden — 
I.L.O. convention providing annual paid 
holiday for agricultural workers rati- 
fied by Sweden, 1625. 

U.S.A.— 
paid vacations general, survey of fringe 

benefit plans reveals, 813. 
year's holiday with pay after 10 years' 
service provided in agreement signed 
between local 1031, I.B.E.W. and 
Hedco Manufacturing Company, 988. 
holiday plans for office workers in manu- 
facturing industries, 39. 
provisions of contract signed between 
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company 
and United Rubber Workers of 
America (C.I.O.), 517. 
birthdays of truck drivers paid holidays in 
Boston under provisions of new con- 
tract, 1474. 
See also Holidays; Minimum Wages. 

Vehicles : 

See Motor Vehicles. 

Vetcraft Shops: 

Canada — 
inclusion of disabled veterans employed in 
Federal Government sheltered work- 
shops under Government Employees 
Compensation Act — revision of Vet- 
craft Shops Regulations, 1180. 

Veterans : 

Canada — ■ 
Veterans Benefit Regulations under Canada 

Veterans Benefit Act, 584. 
Veterans Benefit Act (1951) extended, 
1511. 






INDEX 



CXI 



Veterans — Con. 

Canada — Con. 

amended provisions of National Housing 
Act, 1511-12. 

inclusion of disabled veterans employed in 
Federal Government sheltered work- 
shops under Government Employees 
Compensation Act — revision of Vet- 
craft Shops Regulations, 1180. 

new order under Department of Veterans 
Affairs Act re workmen's compensa- 
tion benefits, 442. 

See also War Dead. 

Veterans Affairs, Department of: 

new order under Department of Veterans 
Affairs Act re workmen's compensa- 
tion benefits, 442. 

Vocational Correspondence Courses: 

See Correspondence Courses. 

Vocational Education: 

Canada — 
report of semi-annual conference of Voca- 
tional Training Advisory Council, 397. 
proposals for revision of Vocational 
Schools' Assistance Agreement, 399, 
1749; extension of agreement to North- 
west Territories, 1751. 

Nfld.: number of graduates in trade courses 
at vocational training school, 369. 

Ont.: establishment of Provincial Institute 
of Trades — regulations under Voca- 
tional Education Act, 116. 

Vocational Guidance: 

I.L.O. report on current problems of voca- 
tional guidance and training for 
women, 413. 

Vocational Schools: 

See Vocational Education. 

Vocational Training: 

Canada — 

proceedings of 19th semi-annual meeting 
of Vocational Training Advisory Coun- 
cil, 396; of 20th meeting, 1749. 

proposals for revision of Vocational 
Schools' Assistance Agreement, 1749. 

specialized training program for "trade 
improvement" in aircraft industry by 
C.V.T. and Northwest Industries, 
Limited, Edmonton, 816. 

vocational training classes for immigrants 
opened in Montreal, 24. 

report on Vocational Correspondence 
Courses Agreement under C.V.T., 1752. 

report on student aid under C.V.T., 1752. 

report on publications, 1752. 

expenditure in 1950, 1429. 



Vocational Training — Con. 
Alta. : specialized training program for 
"trade improvement" in aircraft in- 
dustry by C.V.T. and Northwest Indus- 
tries, Limited, Edmonton, 816. 

Man.: amendment to Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Act, 1034. 

Nfld.: number of graduates in trade courses 
at vocational training school, 369; 
Company trains workers before it 
opens — apprentice training program in 
co-operation with C.V.T., federal De- 
partment of Labour, 368. 

Ont.: one year in five as industrial workers 
recommended for vocational school 
teachers, 816. 

N.W.T.: extension of Vocational Schools' 
Assistance Agreement, Vocational 
Training Agreement and Apprentice- 
ship Agreement to N.W.T., 1751. 

Israel — 
extensive vocational training program, 
1430. 

U.S.A.— 
House of School and Industry aids older 
women to rejoin labour force, 1600. 

Vocational Training Advisory Council: 

proceedings of 19th semi-annual confer- 
ence, 396; of 20th semi-annual meet- 
ing, 1749. 

Voting : 

Canada — 
amendment to Dominion Elections Act 
requested by Canadian Chamber of 
Commerce, 229. 

B.C.: resolution adopted at convention of 
Federation of Labour (C.C. of L.), 
1008. 

Que.: amendments to Cities and Towns Act, 
1042. 

U.S.A.— 
unions urged to make long-term contracts 
as bar to representation vote, by deci- 
sion of N.L.R.B, 372. 

Wage Control: 

U.S.A.— 
wage and salary control suspended, 367. 
suspension of controls recommended in 

memorandum by assistant director of 

price stabilization, 29. 



INDEX 



Wages : 

resolution on wage policy adopted at 
I.L.O.'s Third Asian Regional Confer- 
ence, 1624. 

Canada — 

monthly tabular report on current statistics, 
5, 176, 350, 504, 808, 982, 1114, 1256. 

wage increase provided under terms of 
settlement reached in dispute between 
major railways and 17 non-operating 
railway unions, 19. 

terms of settlement reached between 
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen 
and Canada's railways, 187. 

non-operating railway unions will not seek 
wage increase in 1953, 1422. 

increase in average annual earnings of 
steam railway employees since 1926, 
363. 

four-fifths of Canadian wage-earners re- 
ported earnings of less than $3,000 a 
year in 1951 Census, 190. 

guaranteed wage and employment plans in 
collective agreements, 1269— in manu- 
facturing industry, 1269, 1270; in non- 
manufacturing industries, 1269, 1271. 

wage-rate changes in collective agreements, 
first 9 months of 1952, 218. 

provisions of collective agreements in 
manufacturing industries in effect in 
1952, 222. 

premium rates of plant employees in 
manufacturing industry (in 1949. 1950, 
1951 and 1953), 1530. 

wage rates for male labourers in manu- 
facturing, 1945-1952, 1052. 

annual wage stabilization plans in shoe 
industry, 1270. 

salaries of clerical employees in manu- 
facturing industries, 38. 

premium rates for overtime paid to office 
workers in manufacturing (1949-53), 
1666. 

industrial employment, payrolls and aver- 
age weekly wages and salaries, Sep- 
tember 1, 1953, as reported by D.B. 
of S., 1731. 

average weekly wages and salaries in non- 
agricultural industries, 450. 

average weekly and hourly earnings in 
manufacturing in 1952, 1602. 

salaries of office workers in manufacturing 
industries in 1952, 846. 

provisions of collective agreement between 
Dupuis Freres, Montreal department 
store, and National Syndicate of Trade 
Employees (C.C.C.L.), 1140. 

average hourly and weekly earnings of 
hourly-rated wage-earners as at March 
1, 1953, 868. 



Wages — Con. 
Canada — Con. 

wage changes during 1952, in collective 
agreements, 548. 

average weekly wages and salaries as at 
November 1, 1952, 18. 

decline in average hourly earnings in 
manufacturing during July reported 
by D.B. of S., 1602. 

annual payroll of Canada's retail stores 
during 1941-51, 1518. 

principles of guaranteed annual wage plan 
sought by I.U.E.W. (C.I.O.) in col- 
lective bargaining negotiations at con- 
vention in Montreal, 1598. 

U.M.W. to vote third time on no-increase 
contract — other recommendations of 
union's policy committee, 1602. 

Canadian rubber workers seek equal pay 
to United States, 659. 

20-cents-per hour general wage increase 
sought by United Rubber Workers of 
America, 659. 

U.S.W.A. to seek wage increases to re- 
establish parity with United States 
steel industry — proceedings of National 
Policy Conference, 1457. 

wage increases provided in agreement 
reached between S.I.U. and Shipping 
Federation of Canada, 1597. 

1953 wage demands studied by committee 
established by C.C.C.L., 363. 

general wage increases recommended by 
C.C. of L. in resolution adopted at 
annual convention, 1453; Political 
Action Committee recommends gua- 
ranteed annual wage, 361. 

resolution adopted by T. and L.C. re 
Department of Labour wage surveys, 
1291 ; requests upward revision of civil 
servants' and postal workers' salaries, 
1279. 

wage rates in certain industries — 
meat products, 597. 

municipal government service — fire- 
fighters, police constables, and civic 
labourers, 125, 128. 
pulp and paper, 748, 749. 
tobacco, cigar and cigarette industry, 451. 
B.C.: enactment of equal pay Act, 1735; 
wages cut by non-union lumber mills, 
1596; wage increases for hospital em- 
ployees provided in agreement between 
Vancouver General Hospital and Local 
180, Hospital Employees Federal 
Union (T. and L.C), 54; application 
of Semi-monthly Payment of Wages 
Act to hotel and catering industry, 
1344; provisions of first long-term 
contract in logging industry signed 
between I.W.A. and Western Ply- 
woods (Cariboo) Limited, 814. 



INDEX 



Wages — Con. 

Man.: blanket collective agreement covering 
11 local unions signed between Winni- 
peg Building Trades Council and Win- 
nipeg Builders' Exchange, 811; regula- 
tions under Licensed Practical Nurses 
Act, 1656. 

N.B.: provisions of Fair Wages and Hours 
of Labour Act, 1037. 

N.S.: amendment to Nova Scotia Railways 
Act, not passed, 1806. 

Que.: Louiseville strike (Textile Workers' 
Syndicate, C.C.C.L.), ends with con- 
tract unsigned, but wage increase 
granted, 361 ; agreement reached 
between Montreal civic administration 
and employees (white-collar, police- 
men and firemen), 1597; refrigeration 
company must pay painters, carpenters' 
rates set in construction trade decree, 
1810; provisions of collective agree- 
ment between Dupuis Freres, Montreal 
department store, and National Syndi- 
cate of Trade Employees (C.C.C.Ll), 
1140; survey of working conditions of 
young workers made by Jeunesse 
Ouvriere Catholique, 230, 294. 

Sask.: enactment of equal pay legislation, 
24; proclamation of Saskatchewan 
Equal Pay act, 294; Wages Reqovery 
Act replaces Masters and Servants 
Act, 691. 
United Kingdom — 

average weekly earnings in manufacturing, 
1602. 

resolution adopted by T.U.C. rejects . . . 
wage restraint which interferes with 
freedom of collective bargaining and 
independent arbitration, 1622. 

wage increase granted coal miners by State 
Coal Board, 363. 

Industrial Disputes Tribunal rejects claim 
for wage increase for cotton workers, 
363. 
Israel — 

Histadrut seeks to link wages to produc- 
tivity, 364. 
Norway — 

wage increases in 1953 not disfavoured by 
National Council of the Norwegian 
Federation of Trade Unions, 364. 
Sweden — 

agreement signed between trade unions 
and industry provides that wage pro- 
visions in last year's contract continue 
in force for steel workers in 1953, 364; 
state committee of enquiry recom- 
mends equal pay for equal work in 
Civil Service, 1115. 



Wages — Con. 
U.S.A.— 

distribution of national wage and salary 
incomes, 1430. 

increase in wage scales of building con- 
struction workers, 30. 

wage rates for office workers in manu- 
facturing industries, 39. 

wage reduction for employees of Inter- 
national Harvester Company, in 
accordance with escalator clauses in 
agreements, 809. 

increased hourly earnings of factory 
workers offset reduction in work-week, 
1763. 

A.F. of L. unions urged to seek wage 
increases, 362, 1619. 

wage increases sought by C.I.O. unions 
in 1953, 362. 

office workers earnings in New York state 
(1951-1952), 1605. 

income payments to individuals in 1952, 
1605. 

overtime rates surveyed in 31 unionized 
and non-unionized companies, 1740. 

contract changes provided wage increases 
for employees of Nash-Kelvinator 
Corporation, 809. 

increase in average hourly earnings in 
manufacturing industry during June- 
July, 1602. 

equal pay laws urged by National Con- 
ference on Equal Pay, 519. 

contract changes between U.A.W. and 
Chrysler Corporation, 809. 

annual wage needed by working woman in 
New York state, 812. 

provisions of contract signed between 
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company 
and United Rubber Workers of 
America (C.I.O.), 517. 

National Association of Manufacturers 
opposed to link of wages with produc- 
tivity, 363. 

joint action in wage negotiations by 
Amalgamated Meat Cutters and 
Butcher W 7 orkmen (A.F. of L.) and 
United Packinghouse Workers (C.I.O.) , 
1119. 

collective bargaining effective wage-setter 
— recommendations of special com- 
mittee of Twentieth Century Fund, 
1312. 

annual increase in buying power of 
workers' wages forecast in study 
Employment and Wages in the United 
States, by Twentieth Century Fund, 
1429. 



INDEX 



Wages — Con. 

U.S.A.— Con. 

price cuts rather than wage increase as 

benefits of increased productivity 

recommended by National Association 

of Manufacturers, 660. 
See also Equal Pay; Guaranteed Wage; 

Salaries. 

Wagner, Robert F.: 

death of author of Wagner Labour Rela- 
tions Act, 812. 

Walsh, F. P., President, New Zealand Federa- 
tion of Labour: 
re-election, 1267. 

War Dead: 

Canada — 
provisions of Children of War Dead 
(Education Assistance) Act, 1510. 

Wash-up Periods: 

Canada — 
wash-up periods reported in manufacturing 
industry in 1949, 1950, 1951 and 1953, 
1531, 1532. 

Waste : 

Canada — 
reduction of waste important task of 
L.M.P.C., 1169. 

Water : 

Canada — 
number of persons 14 years of age and 
over employed in water industry in 
1941 and 1951 as reported in D.B. of 
S. 1951 Census bulletin, 28. 

Waterfront Workers: 

U.S.A.— 

racketeering on New York city waterfront 
curbed by legislation enacted by states 
of New York and New Jersey, 1143. 

See also Longshoremen 

Waterways : 

See Chignecto Canal; St. Lawrence Sea- 
way. 

Watts, Henry William: 

death of editor of Vancouver Labour 
Statesman, 366. 

Welding: 

Alta.— 
designated as trade under Apprenticeship 
Act, 1343. 



Welfare : 

See Industrial Welfare. 

Western Plywoods (Cariboo) Limited: 

provisions of first long-term contract in 
logging industry signed between Com- 
pany and I.W.A., 814. 

White-collar Workers: 

Canada — 
salaries of clerical employees in manu- 
facturing industries, 38. 
organization of white-collar workers in 

manufacturing industries, 33. 
office employees' working conditions in 

manufacturing (1949-53), 1665. 
unionization of white-collar workers urged 

by U.S.W.A, 1457. 
Que.: agreement reached between Montreal 

civic administration and employees, 

1597. 
U.SA.— 
working conditions of office workers in 

manufacturing industries, 39. 
merger of white-collar unions approved 

by C.I.O., 815. 

Whitley Council (United Kingdom): 

request by National Whitley Council of 
the Civil Service, for equal pay for 
women, rejected, 24. 

Widows' Allowances : 

Man — 
amendment to Workmen's Compensation 
Act, 1034. 

Ont.: amendment to Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Act, 1034. 

Widows' Pensions: 

See Pensions. 

Winters, Hon. R. H., Minister of Resources 
and Development: 
remarks at convention of Canadian Con- 
struction Association, 189. 

Women in Employment: 

report of subcommittee, on problems of 
women's employment in the textile 
industry — fourth session of I.L.O. 
Textiles Industrial Committee, 694. 

I.L.O. report on current problems of voca- 
tional guidance and training for 
women, 413. 

legislation affecting women and children in 
industry discussed at convention of 
International Association of Govern- 
mental Labour Officials, 1045. 

provisions of I.L.O. Convention No. 100 
concerning equal pay for men and 
women for work of equal value, 1018. 






INDEX 



cxv 



Women in Employment — Con. 

I.L.O. studies problems of women textile 
workers, 235. 
Canada — 

provision for establishment of women's 
bureau within Department, announced 
by Minister of Labour, 812. 

re appointment of Director of Women's 
Bureau, Federal Department of 
Labour, 1422, 1510. 

average hours worked per week in manu- 
facturing in 1952, 1602. 

number of female wage-earners earning 
less than $3,000 yearly, as reported in 
1951 Census of D.B. of S., 190. 

number of married women in labour force 
during period 1941-1951, 662. 

shortage of trained young women workers 
forces industry to hire older women, 
812. 

arguments for equal pay for women pre- 
sented in study by official of Laval 
Centre for Adult Education, 1265. 

private member's Bill, Women's Equal 
Pay Act, not passed, 1514. 

extracts from Hansard re equal pay, 524, 
1745. 

Nfld.:act enforcing fair remuneration for 
female workers requested by Federa- 
tion of Labour (T. and L.C.), 1263. 

N.S.: minimum rate for women workers 
in fish-processing industry, under 
Women's Minimum Wage Act, 1815. 

Ont.: legislation enacted in 1953 re employ- 
ment of women and young persons in 
factories, shops and restaurants, 1037; 
provisions of Factory, Shop and 
Office Building Act re night work of 
women, 1640. 

Que.: arguments for equal pay for women 
presented in study by official of Laval 
Centre for Adult Education, 1265. 

Sask. : proclamation of Saskatchewan Equal 
Pay Act, 294. 

United Kingdom — 
petition demanding equal pay for equal 

work signed by one million British 

women, 1265. 
U.S.A.— 
number of women gainfully employed, 662. 
number of women in paid employment 

quadrupled in 60 years, 1425. 
woman who leaves employment because 

she does not receive equal pay for 

equal work, entitled to unemployment 

insurance benefit, 1122. 
shortage of young women workers, 812. 
House of School and Industry aids older 

women to rejoin labour force, 1600. 



Women in Employment — Con. 

U.S.A.— Con. 

legislation passed in New York state in 

1881 re provision of seats for women in 

factories, 1606. 
resignation of Frieda S. Miller, Director 

of Women's Bureau, Department of 

Labour, 1737. 
annual wage needed by working woman in 

New York state, 812. 

Women's Bureau: 

Canada — 

provision for establishment within Depart- 
ment, announced by Minister of 
Labour, 812. 

re establishment in Federal Department of 
Labour, 1422, 1510. 

Wood Products: 

Canada — 

number of collective agreements and num- 
ber of workers covered by agreements 
in wood products industry, 222. 

Federation of The Wrought Wood Workers 
of Canada — amalgamation of wrought 
wood and furniture federations of 
C.C.C.L., 1258. 

Woodworking Industry: 

Canada — 
Safety Code for the Woodworking Industry 
published by Canadian Standards 
Association, 444. 

Alta.: Safety Code for the Woodworking 
Industry adopted as regulations under 
Factories Act, 584. 

Ont.: strike called by I.W.A., employees of 
Durham Furniture Company, Limited, 
ends without settlement, 361. 

U.S.A.— 
wage increases sought by International 
Woodworkers of America (C.I.O.), 362. 

Woodworkers : 

See abo International Woodworkers of 
America. 

Wool Products: 

Canada — 
imports of wool products during August 
1952 and 1953, 1734. 

Work Injuries : 

See Accidents. 



INDEX 



Workers' Education: 

Canada — 
report of Director of Education Service 

at convention of C.C.C.L., 1465. 
recommendations of T. and L.C., 1289, 
1290, 1291. 
Que.: first labour college in Canada opened 
by C.C.C.L, 20. 

Workers' Educational Association (United 
Kingdom) : 

50th anniversary, 1470. 

Workers' Protection: 

See Protection of Workers. 

Workmen's Compensation: 

Canada — 

amendments to provincial Acts in 1953, 
1033. 

new regulations under Government Em- 
ployees' Compensation Act, 114. 

1952 edition of Workmen's Compensation 
in Canada, A Comparison of Provin- 
cial Laws, issued by Department of 
Labour, 592. 

The Sloan Report — results of inquiry into 
administration of Workmen's Compen- 
sation Act in British Columbia, 552-69 ; 
676-86. 

inclusion of disabled veterans employed in 
Federal Government sheltered work- 
shops under Government Employees 
Compensation Act — revision of Vet- 
craft Shops Regulations, 1180. 

new order under Department of Veterans 
Affairs Act re workmen's compensation 
benefits, 442. 

amount of benefits paid to Canadian 
workers in 1952, 1427. 

conference on uniformity of job accident 
statistics, 516. 

conference proceedings of I.A.P.A. of 
Ontario, 663. 

industrial fatalities reported by Workmen's 
Compensation Boards during 1952, 
863, 960. 

compensable accidents among federal em- 
ployees — Minister of Labour urges 
government workers to avoid acci- 
dents, 571. 
Alta.: regulations under Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act re gas and oil wells, 
588; resolution adopted by Industrial 
Federation of Labour, 1755. 



Workmen's Compensation — Con. 

B.C.: The Sloan Report — results of inquiry 
into administration of Workmen's 
Compensation Act, 552-69; 676-86; 
traumatic deafness included as indus- 
trial disease under Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act, 591 ; full benefits of 
provincial Workmen's Compensation 
Act extended to civil defence workers, 
1115; workers in prison hospital unit 
eligible for compensation for tuber- 
culosis under amended schedule of Act, 
1181; resolution adopted at conven- 
tion of Federation of Labour (C.C. of 
L.), 1008. 

Man.: 1953 amendments to Act, 1033; recom- 
mendations of Special Select Commit- 
tee of the Legislature adopted at 1953 
session, 1331. 

X.B.: 1953 amendments to Act. 1033; 
amended provisions of Workmen's 
Compensation Act, 1639; amendment 
to Unemployment Insurance Act 
requested by N.B. Federation of 
Labour, 1615. 

Nfld.: 1953 amendments to Act, 1033, 1803; 
appointment of safety and health 
inspectors under Act requested by 
Federation of Labour (T. and L.C.), 
1263. 

N.S.: 1953 amendments to Act, 1033, 1804. 

Ont.: amendments to Workmen's Compen- 
sation Act forecast in Speech from the 
Throne, 361; amendments to Act, 
1033, 1186, 1639; new occupations 
brought under Part 1 of Act by amend- 
ments to General Regulations, 738; 
benefits of Act applicable to civil 
defence workers, 29; report of Work- 
men's Compensation Board (1951- 
1952), 521; conference proceedings of 
I.A.P.A., 663; increase in claims for 
workmen's compensation in 1952 noted 
in annual report of I.A.P.A., 985; new 
head office building opened by Work- 
men's Compensation Board, 663, 1428. 

P.E.I.: 1953 amendments to Act, 1033, 1808. 

Que.: holding that employer was not negli- 
gent, Superior Court dismisses action 
of injured worker for damages, 110; 
new regulation under Act declares 
''tenosynovitis" an industrial disease. 
1519; claims for benefit during 1952— 
annual report of Workmen's Compen- 
sation Commission, 985; number of 
accident claims filed in 1951 and 1952, 
370. 



INDEX 



Workmen's Compensation — Con. 

Sask.: amendments to Workmen's Compen- 
sation (Accident Fund) Act forecast 
in Speech from the Throne, 361; 
amended provisions of Workmen's 
Compensation (Accident Fund) Act, 
1033, 1647; application of Act to mem- 
bers of International Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers, 117. 

N.W.T.: revised regulations under Work- 
men's Compensation Ordinance, 887. 

Yukon : regulations under Workmen's Com- 
pensation Ordinance, 893. 

U.S.A.— 

legislation passed in 1952, 1045. 
legislation enacted in 1913 in New York 

state, 1606. 
See also Accidents; Government Em- 
ployees' Compensation. 

World Calendar: 

adoption of World Calendar considered by 
Economic and Social Council of United 
Nations. 1737. 
Canada — 

C.C. of L. recommends government endor- 
sation of adoption, 538. 

Wrought Wood Workers of Canada, The: 

amalgamation of wrought wood and furni- 
ture federations of C.C.C.L., 1258. 



Year Book : 

Canada's 1952 report for Human Rights 
Yearbook, 1264. 

Young, Douglas, International Labour Organ- 
ization : 
appointment as head of personnel office of 
International Labour Office, 51. 

Young Workers: 

See Child Labour; Juvenile Employment; 
Youth Employment and Training. 

Youth Employment and Training: 

Canada — 
progress report of Assistant Director of 

Vocational Training, 1750. 
enrolments in youth training — report of 
semi-annual conference of Vocational 
Training Advisory Council, 397; report 
of Young Workers' Committee at con- 
vention of C.C.C.L., 1466. 

Ont.: legislation enacted in 1953 re employ- 
ment of women and young persons in 
factories, shops and restaurants, 1037 ; 
provision of Factory, Shop and Office 
Building Act re night work of young 
persons, 1640. 

Que.: survey of working conditions of 
young workers made by Jeunesse 
Ouvriere Catholique, 230, 294. 



Yalden-Thomson, William, Assistant Director- 
General, I.L.O.: 
appointment, 51. 



Yukon : 

labour legislation enacted in 1951 and 
1952, 887. 



CURRENT 



JANUARY 15, 1953 



manpower and labour relations 



REVIEW 



Current Labour Market 



THE overall level of employment in Canada declined slightly during 
December. This decline was due largely to seasonal layoffs in 
transportation, construction, agriculture, fishing and their related indus- 
tries. Logging employment fell by mid-December to lower levels for the 
winter season than had been reached for a number of years. With the ex- 
ception of reduced operations in these industries, which contributed to 
increased seasonal unemployment, manpower requirements continued firm 
during the month and consumer durable goods and producer goods indus- 
tries operated at employment levels equal to or exceeding those for the 
same month a year earlier. 

The Labour Force Survey, now being conducted on a monthly basis 
by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, provides an overall picture of 
current manpower utilization patterns. For the week ending December 13, 
1952, it was estimated that 5,276,000 persons were in the active civilian 
labour force, a decrease of 14,000 from the figure reported for the week 
ending November 22, 1952. Of this total, 4,558,000 persons were at work 
for 35 hours or more during the week, 459,000 for fewer than 35 hours, 
127,000 with jobs but not at work and 132,000 without jobs and seeking 
work. 

Of the 459,000 persons working fewer than 35 hours during the week, 
about 225,000 usually work part-time. Of the remaining 234,000 persons, 
30,000 were on short-time, 11,000 were laid off for part of the week, 
30,000 were ill part of the week, 49,000 were on vacation or kept away 
by bad weather and the remainder, 114,000, were affected by industrial 
disputes and religious holidays or had lost or found jobs during the week. 

Of the 127,000 persons estimated to be without jobs and not working 
at all during the survey week, illness (66,000), vacations ( 13,000) and 
layoffs (24,000) were mainly responsible for their idleness. Bad weather 
and industrial disputes were other contributing causes. 



A , , -. - by Economics and Research Branch 

A Labour Gazette Feature DepGrtment . , Labour# nawa 



l 



CURRENT LAIIOI K TRENDS 






INDEX 





CENTS PER HOUR 



HOURS PER WEEK 



1951 „--"' 



JzSL 



AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS 

Manufacturing 



AVERAGE HOURS WORKED 

Manufacturing 



-1951; 




\-~*\ 



1952 




/' 1951 


d 


COST OF LIVING 


1935-39 100 



REAL WEEKLY EARNINGS 

Manufacturing: 1946 = 100 




[Avwipsj 



'1951 



120 



110 



MILLIONS 




fggJFMAMJJASONOJ 




JFMAMJJASONDJ 



It was found that 132,000 persons were without jobs and seeking 
work during the survey week. Another 16,000 who did work during part of 
the week were also actively seeking other work, making a total of 148,- 
000 persons actively seeking work during the week ending December 13. 
This represents an increase of about 13 per cent from the previous sur- 
vey week in November. 

Supplementary information on regional employment patterns is avail- 
able from data on employment registrations at local National Employment 
Service offices. Between November 20 and December 11, 1952, there was 
a seasonal rise in the number of applications on file of nearly 58,000 for 
all regions, bringing the total to 237,200 at the latter date. As in Novem- 
ber, applications on file in Quebec (75,900) and in the Atlantic region 
(31,200) were significantly higher at December 11 than a year earlier. On 
the other hand, the total number of registrations for Ontario (61,200) was 
some 18,000 lower than the previous year, while for the Prairie (32,300) 
and Pacific (36,600) regions the numbers did not greatly differ from those 
of mid-December, 1951. 

Although seasonal unemployment increased during December, 1952, 
there was ample evidence suggesting that most economic activities were 
at higher levels than in the previous year. Retail sales during Novem- 
ber, 1952, were 7.8 per cent higher in value than in November, 1951, 
while the value of department store sales during December, 1952, was 
higher by 15 per cent than in December, 1951. Domestic exports headed 
for another record year, November, 1952, figures being higher by seven 
per cent in real volume terms than those of the previous year. Motor 
vehicle shipments were up by 47 per cent on a year-to-year basis during 
November, while October housing starts (8,529) were nearly double those 
of the previous October. 

Economic activity of this kind was reflected in year-to-year gains in 
employment levels. At November 1, 1952, employment in manufacturing 
industries was more than four per cent higher than a year earlier. In- 
creased consumer sales were reflected in year-to-year employment gains 
in clothing (10 per cent), furniture (9 per cent), automobiles and parts 
(9 per cent) and heating and cooking appliances (7 per cent). The impact 
of the defence program was clearly shown by a year-to-year increase of 
nearly 60 per cent in employment in the aircraft industry and nearly eight 
per cent in the manufacture of electrical apparatus. 

In forestry, on the other hand, employment decreased about 18 per 
cent, compared with November 1, 1951. Recent information published by 
the Canadian Pulp and Paper Association, covering about 70 per cent of 
total logging employment in Eastern Canada, indicates a year-to-year 
decline of about 35 per cent in employment in Eastern pulpwood cutting 
at the end of December, 1952. 

The steady growth of employment in construction during postwar 
years is significant because of the wide seasonal fluctuations in this 
industry. During the month of October, 1952, total employment in this 
industry fell by more than four per cent and in one component, highways, 
bridges and streets, employment fell by 10 per cent. At the end of Octo- 
ber, however, employment levels were still about five per cent higher 
than in 1951. 



The contrast between the employment situation in the industrial and 
agricultural regions in Canada is clearly brought out in the following 
article on local labour market conditions (page 6). As the article shows, 
the labour market was steadier during December in the major industrial 
and metropolitan areas than in the lighter industrial and outlying agri- 
cultural areas, where labour surpluses developed. 



Industrial Relations 



Wage-rate increases were provided by almost 97 per cent of 879 col- 
lective agreements which were renewed by collective bargaining during 
the first nine months of 1952 and which were available for analysis by 
the Economics and Research Branch of the Department of Labour. The 
agreements covered 320,000 workers, 92 per cent of whom received in- 
creases. Thirty per cent of both the number of agreements and of workers 
fell in the range of increases of 10 to 15 cents per hour. Increases above 
this range were featured in 42 per cent of the agreements, covering 27 
per cent of the total number of workers involved. A number of other agree- 
ments were either renewed without change or did not expire during the 
period under review. A detailed analysis of these wage-rate changes will 
appear in the February issue of the Labour Gazette, 

The managements of the major Canadian railways and the unions re- 
presenting their non-operating personnel reached agreement on the terms 
of their new contracts on December 19, 1952. These new contracts will 
run for one year, replacing those signed after arbitration in 1950 which 
ran for two years. A wage increase amounting, on the average, to approx- 
imately 16 cents an hour was agreed upon, following the majority recom- 
mendation of the conciliation board, as given early in December, 1952.* 
This increase was made retroactive to September 1. Another major item 
in the new agreement is the establishment of a compulsory check-off of 
union dues. In future, all employees in the bargaining group must pay 
dues or their equivalent whether or not they are members of the union. 
Approximately 144,000 employees were affected. 



Explanatory Note 

Labour force estimates are based on a sample survey of 30,000 households chosen by 
area sampling methods in more than 100 different areas in Canada. They are subject to 
sampling error. In general the smaller the estimate, the larger the relative sampling error. 
The estimates, however, do show the numbers in the various labour force categories with 
sufficient accuracy for practical purposes. 

Total applications on file at NES offices exclude registrations from persons known to 
have a job while applying for another one. Means are also taken to exclude, as far as possi- 
ble, persons who have secured work on their own since registration. Nevertheless, the 
figures inevitably include a number of persons who have found employment or who have 
left the labour force by the time the count is made. On the other hand, not all the persons 
who are looking for work register at employment offices. 



* See page 5 5, 

4 



Current Labour Statistics 

(Latest available statistics as of January 14, 1953) 



Principal Items 



Date 



Amount 



Percentage Change 
From 



Previous 
Month 



Previous 
Year 



Manpower 

Total civilian labour force(a) 

Persons with jobs(a) 

Persons without jobs & seeking 
work(a) 

Registered for work, NES 

Atlantic 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie 

Pacific 

Total, all regions 

Ordinary claims for Unemployment 

Insurance benefit 

Amount of benefit payments 

Index of employment (19394=100) .* 

Immigration 

Industrial Relations 

Strikes and lockouts — days lost 

No. of workers involved 

No. of strikes 

Earnings and Income 

Average weekly wages and salaries 

Average hourly earnings (mfg.) 

Average hours worked per week (mfg.) .... 

Average weekly earnings (mfg.) 

Cost-of-living index (av. 1935-39=100) ... 

Consumer Price Index (av. 1949=100) 

Real weekly earnings (mfg. av. 1949=100) 
Total labour income $000,000 



Industrial Production 
Total (Average 1935-39=100) 
Manufacturing 

Durables 

Non-Durables 



Dec. 13 
Dec. 13 

Dec. 13 



Dec. 11 
Dec. 11 
Dec. 11 
Dec. 11 
Dec. 11 
Dec. 11 



Dec. 1 
November 



Nov. 1 



October 



December 
December 
December 



Nov. 1 
Nov. 1 
Nov. 1 
Nov. 1 
Dec. 1 
Dec. 1 
Nov. 1 
October 



October 
October 
October 
October 



5,276,000 
5,144,000 

132,000 



31,247 
75,874 
61,163 
32,299 
36,6 10 
237,193 



161,912 
$6,435,444 



191.9 



10,940 



47,279 

3,646 

18 



$55.63 

$1.31 

42.1 

$55.11 

184.2 

115.8 

113.8 

952 



247.7 
258.6 
307.5 
227.2 



- 0.3 

- 0.6 

+15.8 



+42.8 
+48.8 
+25.2 
+60.9 
+42.2 
+41.5 



+45.2 
+ 12.7 



0.1 



+18.1 



0.9 
0.8 
0.0 
0.8 
0.3 
0.3 
0.7 
0.8 



+ 1.7 
+ 1.1 

+ 0.8 
+ 1.2 



27.2 

12.0 

22.9 

4.1 

5.9 

0.0 



+ 5.4 
+ 26.0 



+ 3.0 



- 4.1(b) 



+2 18.2(b) 
+ 15.2(b) 
- 17.8(b) 



6.9 
6.0 
0.7 
6.8 
3.6 
2.0 
8.4 
9.9 



+ 7.2 

+ 6.2 

+ 9.3 

+ 3.6 



(a) Estimated by DBS on basis of sample labour force survey. Only those who 
did not do any work in the survey week are here classified as persons 
without jobs. 

(b) These percentages compare the cumulative total to date from first of current 
year with total for same period previous year. 



Local Labour Market Conditions 



The Labour Market- illustrated by the pro- 
portion of paid workers within each of the 
four labour market groups to all paid work- 
ers. 
Per Cent Per Cent 




SURPLUS SURPLUS BALANCE SHORTAGE 
GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 



IN evaluating the significance of 
the number of labour market 
areas in the various categories of 
the table below, it is necessary to 
keep in mind the marked seasonal 
variations in labour requirements 
throughout the year in Canada. A 
large number of areas have labour 
surpluses each year from Decem- 
ber to March but these surpluses 
decline sharply and shortages often 
appear from July to October. 

During December, 27 areas 
moved into Group 1 of the surplus 
category. The number in Group 2 of 
this category increased by 13, the number in the balance category de- 
creased by 32 and that in the shortage category by eight. 

The higher demand for labour in manufacturing industries and the 
unusually low labour requirements in logging operations are clearly re- 
flected in the year-to-year comparisons of the local labour market classi- 
fications. At the beginning of 1953, 17 metropolitan and major industrial 
areas were in the balance and shortage categories, compared with 12 at 
the beginning of 1952. On the other hand, there were only 31 major agri- 
cultural and minor areas in these categories at the beginning of 1953 
compared with 52 a year earlier. These year-to-year changes largely re- 
flect the predominance of manufacturing activity in the metropolitan and 
major industrial areas and the importance of logging and agricultural ac- 
tivities in many of the other labour market areas. 

Although there were 16 fewer areas in the balance and shortage 
categories at the beginning of 1953, compared with a year earlier, it 
should be noted that the total number of paid workers in these categories 
remained unchanged. The chart on this page reveals that at January 1, 
1953, areas with balanced labour markets accounted for 58 per cent of 
the paid workers covered by this survey. 



Labour 
Market Areas 




Labour . 


surplus* 




Approximate 
Balance* 


Labour 
Shortage* 


1 




2 


3 


4 




Jan. 1 
1953 


Jan. 1 
1952 


Jan. 1 
1953 


7 an. 1 
1952 


Jan. 1 
1953 


Jan. 1 
1952 


Jan. 1 
1953 


Jan. 1 
1952 


Metropolitan 


3 


2 


1 


4 


6 


4 


— 


- 


Major Industrial 


4 


1 


13 


19 


11 


6 


- 


2 


Major Agricultural 


1 


- 


9 


5 


7 


11 


- 


1 


Minor 


19 


8 


24 


19 


24 


40 


- 


- 


Totals 


27 


11 


47 


47 


48 


61 


- 


3 



See explanatory note on page 14. 



ATLANTIC 

The seasonal influences which had caused a reduction of outdoor 
activity during October and November became more pronounced in Dec- 
ember and contributed to a further lowering of the employment levels in 
such industries as fishing, construction, logging and sawmilling. Pulp 
cutting was also reduced during the month as a result of the usual clos- 
ing of camps for the Christmas holiday season. On the whole, logging 
employment during December was consistently lower than in December, 
1951. In view of the smaller log cut planned this winter, this condition is 
expected to continue. 

Although employment in manufacturing industries declined slightly in 
the fall months, it maintained a level somewhat above the same period in 
1951. There was considerable activity in the shipbuilding and repair in- 
dustries and in the manufacture of iron and steel products during 1952 
and there are indications that manpower requirements in these particular 
industries may be higher this winter than last. 

The diminishing demand for labour during December resulted in the 
reclassification of seven areas into the labour surplus groups. This 
brought 16 of the 21 areas surveyed into the labour surplus category. 

Metropolitan Areas. Job applications registered with the NES office 
in St. John's, Nfld. doubled during December bringing the area into Group 
1 of the labour surplus category. Most of this decline in employment was 
seasonal and was largely caused by reduced labour requirements on local 
construction sites and in developments in the outlying areas. 

Major Industrial Areas. Labour supply and demand continued in 
balance in Corner Brook and Halifax during December. In the remaining 
four major industrial areas, however, labour surpluses accumulated be- 
cause outdoor construction activities declined and alternative employ- 
ment opportunities did not appear. The surplus was particularly large in 
Moncton as seasonal lay-offs in heating equipment firms swelled the 
labour supply. 

Major Agricultural Areas. Construction work at the RCAF base at 
Greenwood declined during December with the result that the Kentville 
area changed from one of balance to Group 2 of the labour surplus cate- 
gory. The labour surplus continued in Charlottetown where activities in 
agriculture and fishing, the two main industries, were suspended for the 
season. 

Minor Areas. The decline in employment was sufficiently marked in 
the Bathurst, Campbellton and Newcastle areas to bring them into Group 
1 of the labour surplus category. Since woods employment is the main- 
stay of the economy in these areas, the low level of employment in the 
industry at the end of 1952 was the principal factor contributing to the 
surplus labour supply. 



CLASSIFICATION OF LABOUR MARKET AREAS, JANUARY 1, 1953 









APPROXIMATE 


LABOUR 




LABOUR SURPLUS 


BALANCE « 


SHORTAGE 




' Group 1 


Group 2 


Group 3 


Group 4 




Quebec — Levis 


Winnipeg 


Calgary 






St. John's 




Edmonton 




METROPOLITAN AREAS 


Vancouver— New 




Hamilton 




(labour force 75,000 or more) 


Westminster 




Montreal 
Ottawa- Hull 
Toronto 






Cornwall 


Brantford 


Corner Brook 






Mop c ton 


Fort William - 


Guelph 






Shawinigan Falls 


Port Arthur 


Halifax 






Trois Rivieres 


New Glasgow 
Oshawa 


Kingston 
Kitchener- 




MAJOR INDUSTRIAL AREAS 




Peterborough 


Waterloo 




(labour force 25,000-75,000; 




Rouyn-Val d'Or 


London 




60 per cent or more in 




Saint John 


Niagara Falls 




non-agricultural industry) 




Sarnia 

Sherbrooke 

St. Hyacinthe 

Sudbury 

Sydney 

Victoria 


St. Catharines 
Timmins — 

Kirkland Lake 
Welland 
Windsor 






Riviere du Loup 


Charlottetown 

Chatham 

Joliette 


Barrie 

Brandon 

North Battleford 




MAJOR AGRICULTURAL AREAS 




Kentville 


Regina 
Saskatoon 




(labour force 25,000-75,000; 




Leth bridge 




40 per cent or more in agriculture) 




Moose Jaw 
Prince Albert 
Red Deer 
Thetford Mines 


Swift Current 
York ton 






Bathurst 


Bracebridge 


Belleville 






Buckingham 


Bridgewater 


Brampton 






Campbellton 


Causapscal 


Dawson Creek 






Chandler 


Chicoutimi 


Drumheller 






Chilliwack 


Dauphin 


Farnham 






Drummondville 


Edmundston 


Gait 






Granby 


Fort Erie- 


Goderich 






Jonquiere 


Port Colborne 


Grand Falls 






La Malbaie 


Fredtricton 


Ingersoll 






Montmagny 


Lachute 


Kamloops 






Newcastle 


Leamington 


Kenora 




MINOR AREAS 


Penticton 


Matane 


Lindsay 




(labour force 10,000-25,000) 


Prince George 


North Bay 


Listowel 






Prince Rupert 


Owen Sound 


Medicine Hat 






Rimouski 


Portage la Prairie 


Pembroke 






Sorel 


St. Jean 


Sault Ste. Marie 






St. Georges Est 


Ste. Therese 


Simcoe 






St. Jerome 


Summerside 


Ste. Anne de 






St. Joseph d'Alma 


Trail 

Trenton 

Valleyfield 

Vernon 

Victoriaville 

Woodstock, N.B. 

Yarmouth 


Bellevue 
Stratford 
St. Thomas 
Truro 
Walkerton 
Weyburn 
Woodstock, Ont 





QUEBEC 

The higher year-to-year employment level maintained in manufactur- 
ing industries helped to offset the rapid decline in seasonal activities in 
Quebec during December. The textile, clothing, leather, boot and shoe 
and various defence-connected industries were employing more workers 
at the end of 1952 than a year earlier. Retail sales continued to exceed 
those of 1951 and the Christmas trade was considerably greater in 1952 
than a year earlier. Seasonal factors, however, exerted a strong influence 
on the employment situation as a whole. Such seasonal activities as 
exploration, road work and construction either could not be carried on at 
all or declined sharply. In addition, employment levels in log-cutting and 
sawmilling industries were considerably reduced. The number of regis- 
trations for employment at NES offices rose rapidly in December to a 
total slightly higher than that of the previous year. A reduction in the 
number of women seeking work was offset by the greater number of men 
registered for employment. 

Metropolitan Areas, In December labour demand and supply in Mon- 
treal remained generally in balance. Employment in manufacturing 
industries continued higher than at the same time in 1951. Job oppor- 
tunities were created as various plants completed the expansion of 
their facilities. In the aircraft and several other industries, shortages 
of tool and die makers, machinists and sheet-metal workers existed. As 
winter set in, however, labour supplies increased and resulted in sur- 
pluses of construction workers, seamen, farm workers and general un- 
skilled labourers. 



In Quebec city, the effects of this year's reduced logging cut were 
more pronounced during December than a month earlier and resulted in 
the area being reclassified from Group 2 to Group 1 in the labour surplus 
category. The manufacturing industries were more active than a year 
earlier and the number of registrations by women at NES offices was 
substantially lower than in December, 1951, when the boot and shoe, 
clothing and textile industries were operating at reduced levels. Reduced 
logging operations and declines in other seasonal work, however, more 
than offset these favourable factors. 

Major Industrial Areas, Of the five areas in this group, three were 
classified in a different category at January 1 than at the beginning of 
December. Shawinigan Falls and Three Rivers changed from Group 2 to 
Group 1 in the labour surplus category and Sherbrooke from the balanced 
to Group 2 of the labour surplus category. These shifts appeared to be 
the result of growing seasonal slackness and the smaller wood cut. 

Major Agricultural and Minor Areas, Logging is the main source of 
employment during the winter in many of these areas. The decreased 
wood cut at the end of 1952 was the principal reason for most of these 
areas having labour surpluses. Only Ste. Anne de Bellevue and Farnham 
remained in the balanced category. 

10 



ONTARIO 

During the fourth quarter of 1952 industrial employment in Ontario 
exceeded the 1951 level as the defence-connected industries continued 
to expand, increased steel capacity came into production and sustained 
demand for consumer goods held employment in these industries firm. 
Moreover, in the latter part of 1952, the volume of housing starts was 
considerably higher than in the same period in 1951. This, together with 
favourable weather conditions, resulted in the maintenance of higher than 
usual levels of employment in construction work for December in most 
parts of the Ontario region. 

The gradual reduction in outdoor construction activity during Decem- 
ber and the early part of January, however, combined with a reduction 
in the level of woods work this winter as compared with a year earlier, 
caused some labour surpluses in a few areas. Nevertheless, 27 of the 40 
areas under review still had approximately balanced labour markets at 
the end of 1952. Extra Christmas sales staff was released during the 
last week in December or the first week in January and some woraens' 
clothing manufacturing plants closed down for a few weeks before be- 
ginning production of their spring lines. 

Metropolitan Areas. The fact that labour requirements of manufactur- 
ing industries in Toronto and Ottawa-Hull and of the construction indus- 
try in Hamilton were higher in December, 1952, than a year earlier re- 
duced the effects of seasonal employment declines in these areas. Some 
slackening in construction activity and in a number of seasonal manu- 
facturing industries, such as womens' clothing, relieved the shortage of 
labour in Toronto so that in December all three metropolitan areas had 
balanced labour markets. No labour shortages were reported to the NES 
except for machinists, toolmakers and machine shop workers. 

Major Industrial Areas. Labour requirements did not change appre- 
ciably in these areas during December. No large lay-offs and very little 
hiring occurred in the manufacturing industries. As a result, the majority 
of these areas were still in the balanced labour market category at the 
beginning of January. However, lay-offs in a textile plant producing for 
the rubber industry increased the labour surplus in Cornwall and resulted 
in its reclassification from Group 2 to Group 1 of the labour surplus cate- 
gory. Sarnia was brought into a surplus category by the gradual reduction 
in construction activity, which, combined with the reduced logging cut, 
also caused surpluses in Peterborough and Sudbury. Brantford and Osh- 
awa continued to have a labour surplus since the farm implement and 
automobile industries were still operating at seasonally low levels. 

Major Agricultural and Minor Areas. Of the 21 major agricultural and 
minor areas under review, 15 were still in approximate balance at Jan- 
uary 1 but the gradual seasonal decline in construction resulted in sur- 
pluses of carpenters, painters and unskilled construction workers in many 
of the areas. This, together with the seasonal slack in food process- 
ing, the reduction in woods activity and the closing of navigation on the 
Great Lakes, caused some labour surplus in Bracebridge, Chatham, 
Leamington, North Bay, Owen Sound, Port Colborne and Trenton. 



11 



PRAIRIE 

During the last quarter of 1952, employment levels were higher than 
at the same time in 1951 in almost all parts of the region. Harvesting 
labour requirements were exceptionally heavy and in addition, non-agri- 
cultural firms showed a year-to-year employment gain of approximately 
13,000 workers. A large part of this increase stemmed from the demands 
of expanding oil and chemical industries in Alberta. Elsewhere in the 
region the main stimulus came from defence construction projects, which 
contributed to the strong demand for construction workers during the fall. 
Since the value of uncompleted defence construction contracts at the end 
of November was about one-third greater than a year earlier, this work is 
again expected to be a significant factor underlying total labour demand 
in the early spring. 

The supporting effect of increasing industrialization, defence con- 
struction work and large grain crop payments extended into December, 
partially offsetting the decline in agricultural activity during the month. 
This, in addition to the usual migration of workers to British Columbia, 
resulted in 13 of the 21 areas, including two of the three metropolitan 
centres, having a balanced labour market. Surpluses in the remaining 
eight areas were partly the result of the relatively small number of work- 
ers employed in pulp cutting this winter. 

Metropolitan and Major Industrial Areas. Although the number of idle 
workers rose in all three metropolitan areas, the increase was not suf- 
ficiently great in Calgary and Edmonton to require reclassification from 
the balanced category. There were some lay-offs and a greater degree of 
short time in coal mining than in previous months but other decreases in 
employment were relatively small and mainly seasonal. Employment in 
packing plants increased steadily and activity in construction work con- 
tinued at a higher level than in 1951. A larger proportion of wage-earners 
was registered for work at the NES office in Winnipeg than in Calgary or 
Edmonton, although the number was slightly smaller than at the same 
time a year earlier. Some lay-offs occurred in foundry plants but the level 
of operations in construction, secondary textiles and meat-packing was 
reported to be higher in December, 1952, than in the previous year. 

In the Fort William-Port Arthur area, employment in logging work was 
about 50 per cent below the level of the previous year. During Decem- 
ber, however, a substantial number of workers was hired as a result of 
the strengthening in the demand for sulphite pulp. 

Other industries in the metropolitan and major industrial areas show- 
ed little change during the month, with the exception of aircraft manu- 
facturing in which some employment expansion took place. 

Major Agricultural and Minor Areas. By the end of December, only 
six of the 17 areas in these classifications were in the surplus category. 
The completion of sugar refining and an unusually low level of coal pro- 
duction increased the number of idle workers in Lethbridge and Red Deer. 
In Dauphin, bush work failed to absorb the usual number of workers re- 
leased by the completion of rural electrification and construction work. 
Suspension of work on defence projects contributed to labour surpluses 
in Portage la Prairie and Prince Albert. 

12 



Employment conditions in the agricultural and minor areas exper- 
ienced the deterioration usually accompanying the decline in seasonal 
activities such as agriculture and construction. 

PACIFIC 

After two months during which non-agn cultural employment attained 
record levels, labour requirements eased considerably during the second 
half of December and labour surpluses mounted to a level well above that 
of a month earlier and approximately equal to that of December 1951. In 
addition to the seasonal closing of food processing plants and the usual 
year-end closing of logging and construction operations, a number of 
other factors combined to reduce employment in all parts of the region. 
These included a lower export demand for lumber, base metal and fish 
products, an unsettled dispute between fishermen and operators over the 
price of herring, which led to a cessation of fishing operations, and a 
continuing power shortage in the southern interior which caused sizeable 
layoffs in several mining and smelting firms. 

By January 1, labour surpluses had developed or increased in all 
but one of the nine labour market areas surveyed. At the beginning of 
December only four areas had surpluses. 

The reduction of these surpluses during January will probably de- 
pend to a considerable extent on weather conditions. Because of the re- 
latively light snowfall it was expected that a good deal of labour would 
be employed earlier than usual in the new year. Many logging, sawmill- 
ing and large construction operations were scheduled to resume work 
during the first week of the month. 

Metropolitan and Major Industrial Areas. The usual exodus of work- 
ers from distant construction sites and logging areas contributed to the 
increase of 46 per cent in the number of workers registered with NES 
offices in Vancouver-New Westminster. Hiring in manufacturing indus- 
tries was low. Fish canning was at a standstill and activity in machine 
shop and shipbuilding yards at a reduced level. 

Although some labour surplus developed in Victoria, industrial ac- 
tivity was greater there than in other areas of the province. Employment 
in the construction industry was above average for the time of year. Tem- 
porary lay-offs occurred in shipbuilding yards but the volume of defence 
work on hand and in prospect indicated increasing activity in the near 
future. 

Minor Areas. Four areas in this category were in the Group 1 labour 
surplus classification during December. In Prince Rupert and Prince 
George the loss of herring production and the completion of some phases 
of the Aluminum Company of Canada development at Kitimat reduced em- 
ployment opportunities. The situation was further affected by an unusual- 
ly large inflow of workers from other provinces. In Chilliwack employ- 
ment fell markedly as a result of the completion of two hydro-electric 
projects and the early closing of logging camps. The surplus in Pentic- 
ton was of a more seasonal nature, resulting mainly from the decline in 
agricultural activity and fruit packing. A greater amount of construction 
work is being done in this area than in former years and this may require 
more workers than usual during January. 

13 



Explanatory Note 

In this section, the system of classifying the labour market situation in in- 
dividual areas is an analytical device whose purpose is to give a clear and brief 
picture of local labour market conditions based on an appraisal of the situation 
in each area. In considering the significance of the number of areas in each cate- 
gory, it is necessary to keep in mind the marked seasonal fluctuations in labour 
requirements in Canada. Labour surpluses are consistently highest in each year 
from December to March and lowest from July to October. 

The criteria on which this classification system is based are as follows: 

Group 1: Labour Surplus. Areas in which current or immediately prospective 
labour supply exceeds demand in almost all of the major occupations. This sit- 
uation usually exists when the ratio of applications for employment on file with 
NES to paid workers, including those looking for jobs, is more than 9.9, 11.9 or 
13.9 per cent, depending on the size and character of the area. 

Group 2: Labour Surplus. Areas in which current or immediately prospective 
labour supply exceeds demand in about half of the major occupations. The sit- 
uation usually exists when the ratio of applications for employment on file with 
NES to paid workers, including those looking for jobs, is more than 5.9 or 6.9 per 
cent but less than 10.0, 12.0 or 14.0 per cent, depending on the size and char- 
acter of the area. 

Group 3: Balanced Labour Supply. Areas in which current or immediately 
prospective labour demand and supply are approximately in balance for most of 
the major occupations. This situation usually exists when the ratio of applica- 
tions for employment on file with NES to paid workers, including those looking 
for jobs, is more than 1.9 or 2.4 per cent but less than 6.0 or 7.0 per cent, de- 
pending on the size and character of the area. 

Group 4: Labour Shortage. Areas in which current or immediately prospective 
labour demand exceeds supply in most of the major occupations. The situation 
usually exists when the ratio of applications for employment on file with NES to 
paid workers, including those looking for jobs, is less than 2.0 or 2.5 per cent, 
depending on the size and character of the area. 

The regular labour market analyses conducted by the Department of Labour 
in the postwar years indicate that the percentage ranges mentioned are usually 
symptomatic of the differing labour market situations designated in the above 
categories. 

Information on labour market conditions in local areas is obtained mainly 
from monthly reports submitted by each of the local offices of the National Em- 
ployment Service. This information is supplemented by reports from field repre- 
sentatives of the Department of Labour who regularly interview businessmen 
about employment prospects in their companies, statistical reports from the Dom- 
inion Bureau of Statistics and relevant reports from other federal government 
departments, from provincial and municipal governments and from non-governmen- 
tal sources. 

To facilitate analysis, all labour market areas considered in this review 
have been grouped into four different categories (metropolitan, major industrial, 
major agricultural, and minor) on the basis of the size of the labour force in each 
and the proportion of the labour force engaged in agriculture. This grouping is 
not meant to indicate the importance of an area to the national economy. The key 
to this grouping is shown in the map chart on page nine and in the listing oppo- 
site the map. 

The geographical boundaries of the labour market areas dealt with in this 
section do not coincide with those of the municipalities for which they are named. 
The Toronto labour market area, for example, includes the towns of New Toron- 
to, Mimico, Long Branch, Weston, Leaside and Swansea, as well as other parts 
of the county of York, although not all of it. In general, the boundaries of these 
labour market areas coincide with the district serviced by the respective local 
office or offices of the National Employment Service. 

Not all areas in Canada are dealt with in this section. Information currently 
available about labour market conditions in areas with a labour force of fewer 
than 10,000 workers is not sufficient to permit adequate analysis. The 122 labour 
market areas covered in this analysis include 90 to 95 per cent of all paid work- 
ers in Canada. 

14 



Plant Expansion and Employment 
Opportunities in 
Manufacturing Industries, 1952 



THE regular survey conducted by the Economics and Research Branch 
of the Department of Labour on the effects of industrial expansion 
on employment shows that more new jobs were provided by expansion of 
plant capacity in manufacturing industries in 1952 than in any of the past 
five years. The total of 30,000 new manufacturing jobs recorded during 
1952 was nearly double that of the two previous peak years, 1948 and 
1951. Significant changes have occurred, however, in the pattern of plant 
expansion in manufacturing since early postwar years. Early postwar 
expansion was primarily in the consumer durable and non-durable sectors 
of manufacturing. After the Korean. War began, the emphasis gradually 
shifted to the field of defence-connected industries. 

In terms of specific industries, the greatest plant expansion in 1952 
occurred in the Canadian aircraft industry, which provided an estimated 
12,000 new jobs. The electrical apparatus industry provided 4,300 new 
jobs and the iron and steel industry 3,400. Likewise the high level of 
plant expansion in the manufacture of chemical products resulted in at 
least 1,400 new jobs. Most of these jobs were related to Canada's de- 
fence program. 

Regionally, Ontario accounted for more than 50 per cent of the new 
jobs and Quebec for about 25 per cent, the remainder being distributed in 
the Atlantic, Prairie, and Pacific regions. Industrial expansion in the 
Atlantic region was somewhat less in 1952 than in 1951 and much of it 
was concentrated in Newfoundland. 

Canada's defence effort is strongly directed towards aircraft pro- 
duction with the result that more new plants and plant extensions were 
completed in the aircraft and parts industry in 1952 than at any time 
since the Second World War. The completion of 18 new plants and plant 
extensions created a record number of new jobs in one year for one in- 
dustry. This expansion and the heavy volume of hiring in the industry are 
reflected in the fact that reported employment in the aircraft and parts 
industry increased by approximately 11,500 workers from January 1 to 
October 1, 1952. In addition, several plants and plant extensions at pre- 
sent under construction will come into operation in 1953. Of the 12,000 
new jobs created in the industry, 8,600 were in Ontario, about 3,000 in 
Quebec, and 700 in the Atlantic region. 

Expansion in the electrical apparatus industry, also greater than at 
any time in the past five years, was mainly in the fields of electronics 
and television and with less emphasis on consumer goods than in pre- 

15 



vious years. The 30 new plants and plant extensions which began oper- 
ations in this industry during 1952 resulted in about 4,300 new jobs. This 
was an average labour requirement of 140 workers for each new plant or 
extension. More than 3,000 of these jobs were in Ontario, 600 in Quebec, 
and approximately 100 in other regions of the country. 

In the iron and steel industry, most of the 3,400 new jobs created by 
plant expansion were in firms producing tools, machinery, and other in- 
dustrial equipment, a demand largely stimulated by Canada's defence 
effort. One large plant extension was designed to produce marine tur- 
bines for naval vessels. The producers of basic steel are currently com- 
pleting major expansion projects. One of Canada's major steel producers 
recently completed the largest blast furnace in the country. This, in ad- 
dition to further expansion on the same site, will add 650,000 tons to the 
annual steel output. Most of the expansion in this industry was in Ontario 
and Quebec. 

Considerable industrial expansion also took place in the chemical 
industry and both the volume of investment and the number of new jobs 
created in 1952 exceeded the 1951 levels. In 1952. 36 new plants and 
plant extensions began operations. One chemical company completed 
three new plants and two plant extensions. Because of the relatively low 
labour content characteristic of this industry, the total of 1,400 new 
workers recorded represents a large increase in production. The new 
jobs in the chemical industry were distributed through all regions except 
the Atlantic, the largest increase being in Ontario, followed by Quebec 
and the Prairie and Pacific regions. 

The number of new jobs created by expansion of plant capacity in 
the wood products manufacturing industry exceeded any previous figures 
reached in the survey of the Economics and Research Branch to date. 
At least 1,400 workers were required to man new plant facilities in 1952. 
A large proportion of the new jobs were in British Columbia where major 
expansion of the plywood industry required 600 workers. In both Ontario 
and Quebec, at least 300 workers were required in new furniture and 
woodworking plants and sawmills. 

The level of plant expansion was high also in the non-metallic 
mineral products industry, the bulk of it being in the asbestos, abrasives 
and cement products sectors. The expansion in this industry was fairly 
evenly distributed throughout all regions of the country. During 1952, 
at least 1,300 workers were required to staff the new plant facilities. 






Prepared by 
Economics and Research Branch 
Canadian Department of Labour 



George V. Haythorne, Director R. M. Cram, Assistant Director 

W. R. Dymond, Chief, John Mainwaring, Chief, 

Manpower Analysis Division Labour-Management Division 



16 



Notes of 
Current 
Interest 



New Federation Formed 
By Quebec CCL Unions 

Labour unions in Quebec affiliated with 
the Canadian Congress of Labour founded 
at Montreal, early in December, the Quebec 
Federation of Industrial Unions (CCL). 

Some 200 delegates, representing about 
50,000 workers in the province, took part 
in the conference which led to the setting 
up of the new federation. This brings to 
seven the number of provincial federations 
of the CCL. 

R. J. Lamoureux, President of the Mont- 
real Labour Council and Regional Director 
of the United Steelworkers of America, 
who was chairman of the founding con- 
ference, was elected President of the new 
Federation. 

"The setting up of this new trade-union 
organization," he stated, "shows that the 
Quebec section of the Canadian Congress 
of Labour has reached adulthood and that 
it is asserting its maturity." 

-During the two-day conference, a 
number of speakers made an appeal for 
unity within the Canadian labour move- 
ment, in the hope of establishing an organic 
link between the major Canadian Labour 
organizations. 

Raoul Trepanier, federal Department of 
Labour Conciliation Officer, was one of 
those who asked the new Federation to 
make itself the apostle of unity in the 
labour movement in Quebec. "Do not 
keep up these rivalries which, when all is 
said and done, have weakened us more 
than they have helped us," said Mr. 
Trepanier. "It seems to me, for example," 
he suggested, "that it would be better for 
the province's labour organizations to get 
together when they go every year to make 
their representations at Quebec, rather 
than undertaking each its little pilgrimage 
alone." 

Donald MacDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 
of the CCL, also stressed the need for 
unity within the labour movement. "The 
problem of unity in the Canadian labour 
movement is a complex and difficult one," 
he said at the closing banquet. "Neverthe- 
less, we are prepared to support any effort 



which aims at bringing about this unity. 
All we ask," he added, "is that people who 
are concerned with this question of unity 
should tackle it with as sincere a desire 
as we have to see it worked out." 

During the conference, the delegates also 
heard Paul Emile Cote, Parliamentary 
Assistant to the Minister of Labour; Jean 
Paul Ferland, Conciliation Officer for the 
provincial Department of Labour; and 
Mrs. Therese Casgrain, Quebec CCF 
leader. 

In addition to ratifying their new con- 
stitution, the delegates also adopted a 
number of resolutions, requesting, among 
other things, that no union, whatever its 
allegiance, should cross another union's 
picket line; that the Superior Labour 
Council should meet more often; and that 
the electoral map of Quebec be reformed. 
One of the first gestures of the new 
Federation was to set up a political action 
committee. 

In addition to President Lamoureux, the 
Executive Committee of the Quebec 
Federation of Industrial Unions is made 
up of the following officers: Hyman Reiff 
and Joseph Tessier, Vice-Presidents; 
Romeo Mathieu, Secretary; Romeo Leroux, 
Treasurer; Rene Martin, Gerard Freve, 
Henri Jean, Rolland Goedike, L. McCor- 
mack, D. Archambault and L. Packwood, 
Directors. 



Work Lihely in 1953 for 
All Steelworteers — Gregg 

A great many industrial projects, in- 
cluding the St. Lawrence seaway and the 
aluminum development at Kitimat, B.C., 
will likely require all available steel 
workers in 1953, the Hon. Milton F. Gregg 
said recently in reply to a delegation of 
steel and auto workers. 

Headed by C. H. Millard, Canadian 
Director of the United Steelworkers of 
America, the 14-man delegation submitted 
a seven-point plan to the Government 
designed to overcome a slump in farm 
machinery production. It included giving 
away free tractors and other farm imple- 
ments to underdeveloped countries; the 
establishment of a joint industry, labour 
and government council to stabilize the 
industry and reduce seasonal layoffs; and 
the channelling of federal defence contracts 
to the industry to use up idle production 
capacity and give employment to the large 
numbers of workers laid off recently in the 
Hamilton, Toronto, Woodstock and Brant- 
ford areas. 

Mr. Gregg said the Government will 
consider the plan. 



67040—2 



17 



Slight Employment Drop 
Recorded at November 1 

Employment in Canada's principal indus- 
tries was slightly lower at the beginning 
of November than a month earlier but 
higher than the November 1, 1951, level, 
according to the Dominion Bureau of 
Statistics. Payrolls and average weekly 
wages and salaries, however, climbed to 
record levels. 

The advance index of employment at 
November 1 stood at 191-9, compared with 
192-6 at October 1 and 186-4 at November 
1, 1951. The payrolls index was 454-6 at 
November 1, 452-2 at October 1 and 413-4 
at November 1, 1951. Weekly wages and 
salaries averaged $55.63 at November 1, 
$55.12 at October 1 and $52.05 on 
November 1, 1951. 



Fifth Successive Climb, 
Oct. Housing Starts Rise 

Starts on the construction of new 
dwelling units rose again in October for 
the fifth successive month, reversing the 
trend of the first five months of the year. 
Completions increased in October, after 
decreases in all earlier months of 1952 
except August. 

Number of dwelling units on which con- 
struction was started in October was 9,810, 
compared with 8,529 in September and 
4,977 in the corresponding month in 1951. 
This brought the cumulative total for the 
first 10 months of 1952 to 71,850, compared 
with 62,564 in the similar 1951 period. 

Completions Total 9,510 

Completions in October 'totalled 9,510 as 
compared with 5,819 in the preceding 
month and 8,164 in the same month of 
1951. In the January-October period com- 
pletions totalled 56,295 as compared with 
65,969 in the similar 1951 period. The 
carry-over of uncompleted dwellings in 
various stages of construction at the end 
of October was 59,334 compared with 
55,180 a year earlier. 



Housing Starts Higher 
In U.S. in October 

Housing starts in the United States 
totalled 101,000 during October, an in- 
crease of 3,000 over September and 11,000 
over October 1951, according to prelim- 
inary estimates of the U.S. Labour Depart- 
ment's Bureau of Labour Statistics. The 
September-October increase was almost 
entirely in private housing, which totalled 
an even 100,000 units in October. 



18 



So far this year, 966,400 new permanent 
non-farm dwelling units were put under 
construction, 10,400 units above volume 
for the first 10 months of 1951 but about 
a quarter of a million under the level for 
the same period in the peak year 1950. 
Private housing in 1952 was 29,100 units 
above the previous year's mark while 
public housing was lagging by 18,700 units 
when the first 10 months are compared. 
Altogether, new private housing begun to 
the end of October 1952, totalled 917,500 
units and public housing, 48,900 units. 






Rritain Ruilt More 
Homes in September 

September 1952, was Britain's best month 
since the war for the number of permanent 
houses completed. 

According to the U.K. Central Office of 
Information, 22,323 permanent houses were 
completed during the month, compared 
with 17,168 in September 1951. 

The number of men employed on 
permanent house construction and the 
preparation of housing sites at the end of 
September was estimated at 271,900. 

Up to the end of September, 1,344,588 
houses have been completed under the 
post-war program. Of this number, 
1,187,442 are permanent. 



Name New Co-Chairman 
Of Manpower Council 

John W. Pickersgill, Clerk of the Privy 
Council, has been named co-chairman of 
the National Advisory Council on Man- 
power. He succeeds Norman Robertson, 
his predecessor as Clerk of the Privy 
Council, who is now High Commissioner 
to the United Kingdom. 

Arthur MacNamara, Deputy Minister of 
Labour, is the other co-chairman of the 
32-member body that advises the govern- 
ment on manpower problems. 



N.R. Labour Minister 
Honoured by Union 

Local No. 1 of the Bricklayers, Masons, 
and Plasterers' International Union of 
America (AFL-TLC) in Saint John, N.B., 
has made Hon. A. E. Skaling, Minister of 
Labour for New Brunswick, its honourary 
president for life. Mr. Skaling was Presi- 
dent of the local for 22 years, resigning 
from the post December 1, because of his 
government duties. 






Railway Dispute Settled 
At Top-level Meeting 

The dispute between Canada's major 
railways and 17 non-operating railway 
unions was settled December 19. 

The settlement provides for the average 
wage increase of 16 cents an hour recom- 
mended in the conciliation board's majority 
report (.sec p. 55) and for the compulsory 
check-off of union dues for all workers in 
the bargaining unit, union members or not. 
This latter provision is in excess of the 
board's recommendations. 

Another gain for the union was the 
retroactivity of the wage increase, dated 
back to September 1. expiry date of the 
former agreement. On December 9 the 
railways had announced that they were 
putting into effect,, as of December 1, the 
16-ccnts-an-hour boost recommended by the 
board. 

Announcement of the settlement 
followed discussions between union repre- 
sentatives led by Frank Hall, chairman of 
the negotiating committee, and Presidents 
Donald Gordon of the Canadian National 
Railways and W. A. Mather of the Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway Company. 

The unions originally rejected the board's 
recommendations, stating in their letter of 
rejection that "the view r s of the employees' 
representatives are substantially in accord 
with" those in the minority findings. 

The new contract runs for one year 
from December 1, 1952. 



Union Shop, ChecU-off 
Won by U.S. Rail Unions 

A union shop and check-off agreement 
was signed recently between 17 co- 
operating railway labour organizations and 
several railroads in the Eastern United 
States. 

The agreement covers maintenance of 
way employees, telegraphers, signalmen, 
clerks, freight handlers, firemen and oilers, 
marine employees, restaurant employees, 
dispatchers, yardmasters, machinists, elec- 
tricians, metal workers and other allied 
trades. 

All employees under the contract must, 
as a condition of continued employment, 
become members of the union representing 
their craft or class within 60 calendar days 
of the date they first perform compen- 
sated service as such employees after the 
effective date of the agreement. There- 
after they must maintain membership in 
the union, except that such membership 
is not required of any individual until he 



has performed compensated service on 30 
days within a period of 12 consecutive 
calendar months. 

Employees with seniority who are 
transferred to full-time employment not 
covered by the agreement or who go on 
furlough or leave may maintain member- 
ship or not at their option. On their 
return they must again become members 
within 30 days. 

Dues, initiation fees and assessments 
must be uniform for all employees in the 
same status at the same time in the 
same organizational unit. No employee is 
required to become or remain a member 
of the union unless membership is avail- 
able to him on the same terms and condi- 
tions as are generally applicable to all 
members. 

Each employee will be considered by the 
employer to have met the provisions of 
the agreement, and so be eligible for 
continuing employment, unless and until 
such employer is advised to the contrary 
in 'writing by the union. If and when the 
union so advises, and if the employee does 
not demand a hearing before the employer 
and a representative of the union, the 
employer will terminate the employee's 
seniority and employment within 30 days. 
On the other hand, the employee may 
follow up an adverse hearing with an 
appeal to the highest officer of the com- 
pany and beyond this to the Chairman of 
the National Mediation Board. 

Periodic dues, initiation fees and assess- 
ments required for membership in the 
union must be deducted from the wages of 
employees by the employer, who will pay 
these amounts to the appropriate officer of 
the union. However, the employee must 
furnish the employer with a written assign- 
ment to the union of such dues, fees and 
assessments before this deduction can 
become effective. 

The same contract terms respecting the 
union shop were accepted in December by 
two railways in the Western United States. 
They were the Chicago and North Western 
Railway and the Missouri-Kansas-Texas 
Railroad. The contracts, negotiated bj* - the 
same 17 non-operating rail unions, took 
effect January 1. 

Until the signing of the two contracts, 
the western lines had presented a solid 
front against the union shop. 

The annual report of the federal Depart- 
ment of Labour for the fiscal year ended 
March 31, 1952, is now published and 
available for distribution. Copies are 
obtainable at 25 cents per copy from the 
Circulation Manager, Department of 
Labour, Ottawa. 



17040 — 2i 



1$ 



CCCL Holds Month-long 
Labour College in Quebec 

The first labour college in Canada was 
opened last November, at Quebec, by the 
Canadian and Catholic Confederation of 
Labour. Thirty-two members of the labour 
organization, from 13 industrial centres in 
the province and representing 12 different 
classes of industry, left office and factory 
for a whole month for the purpose of 
acquiring a more advanced social, economic 
and trade-union training. 

This was the first time that one of the 
three major Canadian labour congresses 
had asked its members to leave work for 
a month in order to devote themselves to 
the study of economic and trade-union 
problems. 

This latest venture on the part of the 
CCCL in the matter of labour education 
is the outcome of that trade-union train- 
ing which has been under way for a 
number of years now in the form of study 
days and labour action schools. In the 
minds of the leaders of the CCCL, the 
success of this first session of their labour 
college augurs well for the establishment, 
in future, of a trade-union university for 
the working classes of the province of 
Quebec. 

The 32 students taking the first course, 
among whom were a young lady and two 
priests, stayed at the Chateau Bonne- 
Entente, a tourist home in the suburbs of 
Quebec City which the CCCL's Education 
Service rented for the month. 

There the students spent a month listen- 
ing to lectures dealing with such subjects 
as the preparation of placards during 
strikes, the social doctrine of the Roman 
Catholic Church and the economic prob- 
lems of the day. 

The instigator and the first Head of the 
college was Fernand Jolicoeur of Quebec, 
Director of the CCCL's Education Service. 
A graduate in Social Science and Philosophy 
from Laval University, Mr. Jolicoeur was, 
for a number of years, organizer and busi- 
ness agent for the Joliette Central Council. 

"It is time we were giving our attention 
to the training of a larger number of 
competent labour leaders, alive to the more 
and more numerous problems with which 
the trade-union movement has to deal," 
Mr. Jolicoeur stated. "The present 
development of the CCCL," he added, "no 
longer permits a slipshod treatment of 
these questions. The importance and the 
difficulty of our task make it necessary for 
us to know exactly where we are setting 
out from and where we intend to go." 



The program of the courses was very 
full; even the evenings were taken up. 
Economic questions, the social doctrine of 
the Church, education, publicity, the art 
of speaking, and, of course, matters con- 
cerning trade-unionism were considered. 
Nearly half the time spent in class was 
devoted to questions relating to trade- 
unionism, including labour legislation and 
collective agreements. The practical side 
was not overlooked either ; the students had 
to negotiate labour agreements and present 
evidence before courts of arbitration. 

A team of 20 instructors — chosen from 
among the leaders of the CCCL, the 
professors in the Faculty of Social Science 
at Laval University and the directors of 
the Laval Extension Course Centre and of 
the Quebec Co-operation Council — was 
organized to give the courses. 

Financially, the experiment was quite 
costly but the CCCL leaders consider this 
expense an excellent investment. Although 
the registration fees, covering room and 
board and the cost of the courses, amounted 
to only $200, they did- not include travelling 
expenses (most of the pupils returned home 
during the week-end) or compensation for 
the month's wages. These expenses were 
met by the syndicates and the central 
councils or federations who sent members 
to this first course. In return, these mem- 
bers are expected to hold classes on 
week-ends in their respective districts. 

One of the important factors con- 
tributing to the success of the labour 
college was the great variety of pupils 
attending the first session. The average 
age of the thirty-two union members was 
33; the youngest, however, was only 22; 
the oldest, 44. Twenty-seven of the 30 lay 
pupils were married. The group also 
included two priests, who had just been 
appointed chaplains of syndicates and were 
eager to prepare themselves for their new 
duties, and a young lady who holds an 
important executive position in a large 
business syndicate in Montreal. 

Ten pupils were persons who are "on 
leave from duty"; that is, they are in the 
permanent service of the CCCL as business 
agents or officers. The other 22 had to 
give up their regular factory or office work 
for one month to take the course. 

A survey of the union functions of the 
students showed, in addition to the two 
chaplains, six presidents, two vice-presi- 
dents, four secretaries and seven directors 
of syndicates, six organizers and business 
agents of central councils or federations, 
two secretaries and one treasurer of 
federations, one central council secretary 
and one central council treasurer. 



20 



According to the Director of the CCCL's 
Education Service, this first attempt has 
proved that it is possible, and profitable, 
to transplant workers from the factory 
bench to the school desk for a month. 

In view of this success, the organizers 
of the labour college intend to make it a 
yearly institution and, later, a permanent 
one. 

"The CCCL needs competent, disinter- 
ested leaders to act as apostles," Mr. 
Jolicoeur emphasized. ''The purpose of the 
CCCL's labour college is to prepare such 
leaders." 



Waller Reuther Elected 
President of CIO 

Walter P. Reuther, 45, President of the 
United Automobile Workers of America, 
has been elected President of the Congress 
of Industrial Organizations to fill the post 
left vacant by the death November 9 of 
Philip Murray. 

At the CIO convention in Atlantic City 
December 1 to 3, Mr. Reuther was chosen 
over Alan S. Haywood, who was re-elected 
Executive Vice-President of the CIO. 

The convention also adopted unanimously 
a resolution calling for the suspension of 
all wage controls. Declaring that a com- 
prehensive stabilization program did not 
exist and that less than half of the cost 
of living in the United States was under 
effective regulation, the delegates con- 
cluded that there was no justification for 
further maintaining wage stabilization. 

The resolution also urged Congress to 
drop most price controls but to keep curbs 
on rents and raw materials still affected 
by defence production. A stand-by control 
program that could be put into operation 
whenever inflationary pressures required 
was proposed. 

Another resolution called for more co- 
operation between the CIO and the AFL 
with an eventual merger of the two labour 
organizations if this could be arranged. 

Principal speakers at the convention 
were Governor Adlai Stevenson of Illinois, 
who urged organized labour to act with 
greater future responsibility to the coun- 
try; Secretary of Labour Maurice Tobin, 
who said that labour unity was imperative 
and who called for a quick merger of the 
CIO and AFL in order to present the 
incoming Republican administration with a 
solid union front; and A. R. Mosher, 
President of the Canadian Congress of 
Labour, 'who said that his organization in 
Canada was thinking more and more of 
social security on a national scale in spite 
of those who object to the welfare state. 



The CCL, he said, was co-operating with 
the CCF party in an effort to obtain a 
comprehensive national health service. 

Mr. Reuther was born on September 1, 
1907 in Wheeling, West Virginia, the son 
of a German immigrant. At 16 years of 
age he left high school and apprenticed 
himself to a toolmaker. Three years 
later he went to Detroit and became a 
skilled toolmaker. He studied at Wayne 
University and held the position of fore- 
man at the Ford Motor Company. 

In 1933 he went to Germany and from 
there to the Gorki automobile plant in 
Russia. After a period of 16 months training 
youths in the toolmaking trade, he travelled 
to India, Japan and other Asiatic coun- 
tries, returning to Detroit in 1935. 

He formed and became President of 
Local 174 of the UAW while working at 
the Ternstedt plant of General Motors. 
In 1936 he organized and won a sit-down 
strike at the Kelsey-Hayes wheel factory, 
for which action he was made head of 
the UAW's General Motors Division. 

During the Second World War Mr. 
Reuther encouraged airplane production 
and supported the no-strike policy formu- 
lated in 1942. In that year he became a 
Vice-President of the UAW. Due to his 
activity in the 113-day auto strike in 1945, 
which resulted in the first post-war wage 
increase, he was elected President of the 
1,300,000-member union. 

Mr. Reuther is a supporter of organic 
unity between the AFL and the CIO. 



"Most Generous" Pension 
Won by Winnipeg MLGWU 

A pension plan in which employers bear 
the full cost has been established for 
about 1,200 workers in 15 clothing factories 
in Winnipeg. The agreement was nego- 
tiated by the International Ladies' 
Garment Workers' Union (AFL-TLC), 
whose representative termed it the most 
generous retirement scheme of its kind on 
the continent. 

Workers will become eligible for retire- 
ment after only ten years in the industry. 
Retirement age will be 60 years for women 
and 65 for men. Pensions will amount to 
S50 per month for women and $60 per 
month for men. Employers will contribute 
two per cent of their total payrolls towards 
the pension fund which a special com- 
mittee of manufacturers and union repre- 
sentatives will administer. 

The contract, which contains other social 
security benefits and a wage increase, is 
effective for five years beginning January 1, 
1953. 



21 



Manpower Advisory Body 
Studies Defence Needs 

The National Advisory Council on Man- 
power, at a two-day meeting in December, 
closely examined the manpower situation 
as it affects the defence program, particu- 
larly the availability of skilled and highly- 
skilled manpower for the Armed Forces 
and defence production. 

It also urged the Government to declare 
a national policy for the employment of 
older workers and to study the extension 
of unemployment insurance coverage to 
some types of farm workers. 

The Council heard statements from, 
among others. Arthur MacNamara, Deputy 
Minister of Labour and Council Co- 
chairman; Ian Campbell, National Co- 
ordinator of Rehabilitation of Civilian 
Disabled; C. M. Drury, Deputy Minister 
of National Defence; T. N. Beaupre, 
Assistant Deputy Minister of Defence 
Production; George Blackburn, Director, 
Information Branch, Department of 
Labour; and W. W. Dawson, Director. 
Special Services Branch, Department of 
Labour. 

The Deputy Minister of Labour, who, 
with R. G. Robertson, Assistant Secretary 
to the Cabinet, chaired the meeting, told 
the Council that measures were now being 
taken to strengthen Canada's skilled labour 
supply and in the light of some of the 
facts revealed, further work would be 
undertaken where necessary. 

Federal-provincial vocational training- 
plans are already in existence to train 
skilled workers. It was planned to broaden 
these schemes, with a possible lengthening 
of the period of training so that highly 
technical skills might be developed which 
require longer training than can be pro- 
vided through ordinary short-term training 
plans. Emphasis would be placed on in- 
plant training with the assistance of 
industry generally and particularly defence 
plants. 

The shortage of highly skilled techni- 
cians for some of the more complicated 
defence production processes came in for 
lengthy examination. The Council learned 
that because of the great advances in 
weapon and machine design since the 
Second World War, more and more 
technical skills were being demanded by 
both defence industry and the Armed 
Forces. Maintenance of the new equip- 
ment by the Armed Forces called for many 
new advanced skills, which exerted pres- 
sure on the existing supply of tradesmen. 
The Armed Forces and industry were 



developing training courses to meet their 
needs, aided where possible by federal- 
provincial vocational training programs. 

It was reported that last year at this 
time, there were about 100,000 workers 
employed in the plants of prime con- 
tractors on defence production and a some- 
what similar number by subcontractors or 
suppliers. During the past year, combined 
defence employment in these two groups 
had increased by roughly 50,000 or approxi- 
mately 25 per cent. 

It was now expected, on the basis of 
the current program, that the overall 
manpower requirements would not reach 
their maximum level until late 1953. It 
was likely that, by that time, an additional 
20-25 thousand workers would be involved, 
most of this increase taking place in the 
aircraft, weapons, ammunition and elec- 
tronics programs. 

As an indication of the problem of 
finding skilled workers with particular use- 
fulness for present defence industries, it 
was pointed out that mechanical tolerances 
were ten times as exacting as they were 
in Second World War production. Also 
new techniques were required to match the 
stresses of supersonic speeds. 

The recommendation that the Govern- 
ment declare a national policy for the 
employment of older workers followed the 
presentation of a memorandum. "The 
Prob'em of the Older Worker", by Mr. 
Blackburn. 

Mr. MacNamara told the Council the 
Department of Labour will study the ques- 
tion of extending unemployment insurance 
coverage to some types of farm workers. 
R. A. Stewart of the Canadian Federation 
of Agriculture had suggested that farm 
employees doing specialized work, 
mechanics, for example, might be insurable. 

Mr. Campbell said progress is being made 
towards a federal-provincial program to 
place disabled persons in employment. 
Ma j .-Gen. E. L. M. Burns, Deputy Min- 
ister of Veterans Affairs, reported that 90 
per cent of war casualties had been reha- 
bilitated and felt that the same percentage 
of civilian disabled could be placed in jobs. 

Mr. Dawson told the Council there were 
no urgent demands for farm labour at the 
moment but that immigration of farm 
labour would again be necessary in 1953. 



Final 1951 Census figures of occupation 
groups of Canada's labour force population 
by sex, counties or census divisions, both 
rural and urban, have been published by 
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics as 
Bulletin 4-3, 1951 Census series. Copies 
are obtainable from DBS at 40 cents each. 



22 



"Ban Strikes" Say MP, 
Farmers' Spokesman 

Two Canadians have recently called for 
the banning of strikes as a method of 
settling labour-management disputes. 

One is John Sinnott, Liberal Member of 
Parliament for Springfield, Man. Speaking 
in the House of Commons on the federal 
conciliation board's recommended railway 
wage increase, he said he intends to intro- 
duce a private bill to ask the Government 
to ban strikes for a two-year period. 

The other is Roy C. Marler, President 
of the Alberta Federation of Agriculture. 
At the recent convention of the Federa- 
tion's 65,000 members he called for a 
nation-wide plebiscite to determine public 
opinion regarding the settlement of dis- 
putes "by some reasonable and just 
method." 

Addressing the delegates, he said: "I 
believe public opinion has concluded, as 
have many in the labour ranks, that strike 
action does not provide on a long-range 
basis a desirable way of settling disputes 
between management and labour." 



In applying for leave to prosecute, the 
union held the company had violated the 
Ontario Labour Relations Act, which pro- 
vides that all terms of a collective agree- 
ment shall continue until after a concilia- 
tion board has reported on a dispute. 



Agreement Lacking, B.C. 
Herring Operations Closed 

British Columbia's herring fleet will not 
operate this winter. 

The members of the United Fishermen 
-and Allied Workers' Union (TLC) have 
turned down a "final" offer of $5.50 per 
ton made by the B.C. Fisheries Associa- 
tion. The operators have, in turn, rejected 
a union proposal involving a labour price 
formula rather than the price-per-ton basis. 
The new proposal worked out to $6.80 
per ton. 

Before 88 per cent of the union's mem- 
bership voted to reject the offer, the 
Fisheries Association had announced that 
if the offer was not accepted there would 
be no operations this winter. 



Union Permitted to Sue 
For Dues Firm Deducted 

Permission to prosecute a company for 
refusing to turn over union dues deducted 
from the wages of employees has been 
given to the United Steelworkers of 
America (CIO-CCL) by the Ontario 
Labour Relations Board. 

The Wabi Iron Works, New Liskeard, 
took the position that it was not obliged 
to turn the dues over to the union after 
the expiry of the contract and until a new 
agreement was signed. 



B.C. Carpenters Decline 
To Seek 6-hour Day 

A proposal to seek a six-hour day and 
30-hour week in 1953 was rejected at the 
tenth annual convention of the British 
Columbia provincial council of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America (AFL-TLC) in Vancouver recently. 

The convention of 70 delegates, repre- 
senting about 7,000 carpenters in 41 British 
Columbia locals of the union, endorsed the 
six-hour day "in principle" but recom- 
mended that the members ask a smaller 
reduction in work hours next year. 
Carpenters in the province now work a 40- 
Hour week. 

The convention also decided to seek 
more "fringe" benefits, including 4-per-cent 
holiday pay instead of the present 2-per- 
cent and pay for statutory holidays. 

The three top officers were re-elected. 
They are: R. M. Strachan, President; J. F. 
Mobley, Vice-President; and E. T. Staley, 
Secretary. 

Pension Plan Survives 
Firm's Reorganization 

Pension plans incorporated in a union 
contract survive a reorganization of a 
company under the Bankruptcy Act, the 
United States District Court of Puerto 
Rico has held. The decision was handed 
down as a result of claims of railway 
employees against the dissolved American 
Railroad Company of Puerto Rico. The 
Court held that the successor company 
must assume all prior obligations of the 
original agreement. 

The collective bargaining agreement 
reached between the railway employees and 
the dissolved company was "an executory 
contract never rejected by the Court". 
Thus, the Court ruled, the reorganized 
company must carry out the pensions 
provisions of the original collective 
bargaining contract to the full term. The 
Court dismissed the company claim that it 
should be responsible only for those 
employees who became eligible for pensions 
up to the time of the dissolution of the 
bankrupted company. 



23 



Sash. Equal Pay Act 
Comes into Effect 

Provincial legislation granting women 
equal pay to men for comparable work in 
the same establishment came into effect on 
January 1, 1953, it was announced by the 
Saskatchewan government. 

The equal pay act was approved at the 
1952 session of the provincial Legislature 
(L.G., July. pp. 894 and 933). 



British Civil Service Bid 
For Equal Pay Rejected 

Equal pay for equal work for women 
in the Civil Service in Great Britain will 
not be fully introduced in the near future. 
However, the Chancellor of the Exchequer 
reaffirmed the Government's intention of 
making a start with the introduction of 
equal pa}' "when the situation permitted." 

In receiving a deputation from the 
National Whitley Council of the Civil 
Service recently, the Chancellor undertook 
to give at an early date his considered 
view on the arrangements that might be 
made to introduce equal pay by gradual 
stages. 



20 Locals Have Switched 
To AFL Textile Union 

In the six months since George Baldanzi 
left the CIO Textile Workers' Union of 
America (L.G., June, 1952, p. 686) to join 
the AFL United Textile Workers of 
America, some 20 locals with almost 20,000 
workers, mostly in the Southern and 
Middle Atlantic regions of the United 
States, have switched to the AFL, it has 
been reported. The secessionist movement 
in Canada, however, has apparently made 
few gains. 

On September 17, the National Labour 
Relations Board in the United States ruled 
that the transfer of the Baldanzi group 
from the CIO to the AFL was a bona fide 
schism and that, as a result, an existing 
CIO contract in a large textile mill in 
North Carolina was not a bar to an 
election demanded by the AFL rival on a 
showing that employees involved had gone 
over to the AFL. This opened the way 
for other large gains by the UTWA in 
the Southern States. 

Speaking at the CCL convention in 
Toronto last September, Emile Rieve, 
International President of the TWUA, 
said : "I am happy to report to you that the 
union-splitting movement has been a total 
failure. In Canada the issue has been 



decided in almost every local union — and 
the splitters have been decisively defeated 
time after time. In the United States, less 
than 2,500 members have left the organ- 
ization; and while many contests are still 
pending, I doubt that the total will exceed 
10,000 out of a membership of almost 
400,000." 

While defections in the United States 
have exceeded those predicted by Mr. 
Rieve, events in Canada are showing him 
to be correct with regard to this country. 

In September Harold D'Aoust, Cana- 
dian director of the TWUA, reported that 
18 out of 25 locals, comprising some 3,400 
workers or better than 78 per cent of the 
membership in the Hamilton area, had 
voted to return to the CCL-CIO body. 

In Ontario 

In other Ontario towns, the AFL has 
lost nearly 1,000 members, 250 in Wood- 
stock to the TWUA and the rest in 
Welland to the independent Canadian 
Textile Council. This appears to have 
practically ensured the failure of the AFL 
organization drive headed by Sam Baron 
and Jack Robinson, both former CIO 
officials who went to the AFL with the 
Baldanzi group last spring. 



Immigrants in Montreal 
Get Vocational Training 

Vocational training classes for immigrants 
opened at the Montreal Technical Institute 
this month. The first of their kind in 
Canada, the 40-hour lecture courses will 
be aimed at helping skilled workers and 
professionals to adapt themselves to Cana- 
dian life. 

In making the announcement recently, 
Robert Hill, President of the Canadian 
Society for the Aid of Refugees, pointed 
out that many immigrants are former 
lawyers, diplomats and doctors who cannot 
meet Canadian professional standards. 
These people have leadership qualities and 
could make excellent foremen, supervisors 
and directors of work with a little voca- 
tional training. 

The courses will cover language, health 
regulations and systems of measurement in 
both English and French and also make 
provision for young immigrants who want 
to learn a trade. 

The new classes will increase to nearly 
5,000 the number of new Canadians already 
studying in Montreal — mainly languages 
and citizenship. Officials expect this 
number to go up another 2,000 during the 
winter. 



24 



Immigrants in 10 Months 
Last Year Total 146,230 

During October a total of 10,940 immi- 
grants entered Canada, bringing the total 
for the first ten months of the year to 
146,236. This compares with a total of 
152,473 for the same period of 1951. 

Skilled workers comprised the largest 
single group in the 4,974 workers who 
arrived , with a total of 1,244. Other 
major groups among the workers were 870 
unskilled and semi-skilled, 764 female 
domestics, 748 professionals and 315 
destined for Canadian farms. 

The month's figures showed a continua- 
tion of the increase in immigration from 
Great Britain, with 3,856 English, Irish, 
Scottish and Welsh arriving in October of 
this year compared with 3,123 in the same 
month a year ago. Total arrivals from 
the United Kingdom in the ten months 
of this year now stand at 36,637, com- 
pared with 25,058 during the same ten 
months of 1951. Representing an increase 
of 46 per cent, the ten-month British 
arrivals are almost 5,300 in excess of the 
12-month total of 1951. 

Also exceeding the total 12-month figures 
of 1951 are the number of immigrants who 
have come to Canada from the United 
States and the number of Canadians who 
have returned to Canada from that 
country. In the ten months of this year, 
7,904 United States immigrants have come 
to Canada and in the same period 4,104 
Canadians have returned. During all of 
1951 the total of United States immigra- 
tion was 7,732 and of returning Canadians 
3,635. October figures themselves showed 
927 immigrants from the United States, an 
increase of 28 per cent over the 722 who 
arrived in the same month a year ago, and 
311 returning Canadians, compared with 
291 in October 1951. 

While figures from the United Kingdom 
and the United States are up, the total 
immigration for the ten months is down 
four per cent or 6,177 from the total of 
the first ten months of 1951. 



Technical English Taught 
Immigrants in Hamilton 

A project designed to teach technical 
English to New Canadians who are quali- 
fied engineers and draftsmen is being con- 
ducted at the Canadian Westinghouse 
plant in Hamilton. 

Under the direction of E. L. Lyons, the 
company's Supervisor of Instruction. 25 
students representing 12 European coun- 
tries are learning the English equivalents 



of technical terms and equipment they 
are already familiar with. All are seeking 
membership in the Association of Profes- 
sional Engineers in Ontario, a qualification 
necessary before any one may practise as 
an engineer. 

Besides studying technical terms, taught 
by means of blackboard diagrams and a 
Westinghouse booklet, the students are 
making rapid progress in conversational 
English. 



675,423 Receive Pension 
At End of October 

The number of persons receiving old age 
security payments in Canada stood at 
675,423 at the end of October. This total 
is about 95 per cent of all persons in 
Canada 70 years of age or older. 

More than 6,100 persons received the 
$40 payment for the first time in October. 
Of this number more than 1,000 could 
have been paid last January when the 
program began if they had sent in their 
applications in time. Payments are not 
retroactive. 

The number of persons in Canada 
receiving assistance under the Old Age 
Assistance Act at September 30, 1952, was 
81,016. 

The federal Government's contributions 
under the Federal-Provincial scheme from 
January 1, 1952, when the Act came into 
operation, to September 30, 1952, totalled 
$11,701,580.01. 

The number of blind persons in Canada 
receiving allowances under The Blind 
Persons Act was 8,313 at September 30, 
1952. 

The federal Government's contributions 
under the Federal-Provincial scheme from 
January 1, 1952, when the Act came into 
operation, to September 30, 1952, totalled 
$2,224,432.08. 



Name JVeti? Members to 
SasU. Apprentice Board 

The membership of the Provincial 
Apprenticeship Board of Saskatchewan has 
been changed. The new members are 
D. P. Logan of Yorkton and A. J. Rankin 
of Moose Jaw, representing employers; 
William Simpson of Regina and F. Turcotte 
of Saskatoon, representing workers; W. A. 
Ross of Regina and A. E. Peacock of 
Moose Jaw, representing the Department 
of Education; and J. S. Dornan of Regina, 
representing the Department of Labour. 
Mr. Dornan will be Chairman of the 
Board. 



67040—3 



25 



Four Provinces Require 
Apprentices to Register 

In four of the seven provinces in which 
federal-provincial agreements are in effect, 
registration of apprentices in designated 
trades is compulsory. All seven prov- 
inces require apprentices to attend day or 
evening classes. This was learned 
through an inquiry, made by the Training 
Branch of the Department of Labour, 
concerning compulsory legislation in the 
various provinces and the efforts made to 
enforce registration and school attendance. 

Reporting on the findings to the 
Apprenticeship Training Advisory Com- 
mittee, at whose request the inquiry was 
made, A. W. Crawford, Director of Train- 
ing, said it was found that compulsory 
registration is fairly well enforced in 
designated apprenticeship trades controlled 
by Tradesmen's Qualification Acts but that 
the registration of apprentices in other 
designated trades is difficult to enforce. 
With one or two exceptions, the small 
numbers of registered apprentices in the 
various trades in each province, he said, 
indicate that many learners who should 
be indentured and registered are not 
receiving the benefits of such legislation. 

Reluctant to Prosecute 

From the information received, school 
attendance does not appear to be better 
enforced in the provinces which have 
compulsory legislation than in those prov- 
inces where such attendance is a condition 
of the apprenticeship contract, but is not 
controlled by law. Apprenticeship officials 
are reluctant to prosecute employers or 
apprentices in cases of known violation of 
the law. 

The emphasis in all provinces, Mr. 
Crawford gathered, is on voluntary co- 
operation rather than on compulsory legis- 
lation. Where an earnest effort is made 
to provide suitable effective trade instruc- 
tion in day classes, there is a growing 
tendency on the part of employers and 
apprentices to take advantage of such 
instruction. 

In some provinces, he continued, cer- 
tificates are issued despite failure to comply 
with the regulations governing school 
attendance, particularly in cases where 
provision for such instruction is inade- 
quate. A few provinces refuse to issue 
certificates if the apprentice does not 
regularly attend classes, unless his absence 
was for good reason approved by the 
provincial authorities and he is able to pass 
a trade test on completion of the training 
program. 



Replies to the inquiry received from the 
various provinces are summarized as 
follows: — 

New Brunswick — There is no legislation 
which requires an employer to indenture 
an employee in any trade. The Health 
Act requires that before writing examina- 
tions for a plumbing licence the candidate 
shall have been indentured as an appren- 
tice. Plumbing employers are required 
under this Act to register all helpers. 

The Apprenticeship Act or standards of 
the province call for at least 144 hours of 
related class instruction for each year of 
the apprenticeship period. An effort is 
made to enforce this requirement where 
instruction is available through full-time 
day training classes or part-time day and 
evening classes. Some contracts have been 
cancelled for failure to attend such classes. 
Where no such instruction is available, the 
apprentice is required to pass an examina- 
tion in trade theory before receiving his 
certificate. 

Ontario — Employers are required to 
register apprentices in all designated trades 
and regulations provide for compulsory 
school attendance. Enforcement has not 
been strict but recently the Advisory 
Committee decided to do everything 
possible to see that apprentices attend 
classes, and no diploma is to be issued to 
any apprentice at the conclusion of the 
training period if he has not fully attended 
day classes in accordance with the 
regulations. 

Manitoba — Manitoba legislation provides 
for compulsory registration and school 
attendance. One employer was prosecuted 
and fined $10 and costs for failure to 
comply with the Act. Apprentices who fail 
to attend classes forfeit remuneration for 
the period of such non-attendance and the 
contract may be cancelled if the apprentice 
fails to attend without reasonable excuse. 
School attendance depends largely on the 
attitude of the employer. 

Saskatchewan — Saskatchewan has no com- 
pulsory apprenticeship legislation. All 
apprentices are indentured on a voluntary 
basis. The apprenticeship contract requires 
attendance at school when so directed by 
the Apprenticeship Director. Recently a 
few contracts have been cancelled for 
refusal to attend classes. No apprentice 
has been held back for non-attendance at 
classes. The continuing improvement of 
training facilities is changing the attitude 
of employers and improving school 
attendance. 

Alberta — The Act and regulations of 
Alberta require that every person over 16 
years of age receiving instruction in a 



26 



designated trade must be registered as an 
apprentice. Seven trades require certifica- 
tion under the Tradesmen's Qualification 
Act. The building trades are not so regu- 
lated and any person receiving journeyman 
rate is deemed to be a qualified tradesman. 

Attendance at day classes is compulsory 
and a real effort is being made to enforce 
such attendance. The Apprenticeship Board 
has ruled that apprentices who do not 
attend classes as notified shall be frozen 
in their apprenticeship, at the date of the 
closing of the class which they were notified 
to attend. Notice of class opening is 
mailed two weeks in advance. 

British Columbia — The British Columbia 
Act requires that an employer shall place 
every minor employed by him in a desig- 
nated trade under contract of apprentice- 
ship, subject to penalty for non-compliance. 
As in other provinces, enforcement is 
effected through field inspectors. Appren- 
ticeship regulations require attendance at 
evening classes and it is estimated that 
where such classes are available, approxi- 
mately 95 per cent of the apprentices 
attend. Correspondence courses are made 
available to apprentices in isolated areas. 
Apprenticeship certificate is withheld from 
apprentices who refuse to attend available 
classes. 

The National Conference on Apprentice- 
ship in Trades and Industries, at its meet- 
ing in May 1952, recommended "that action 
be taken by the provinces to ensure that 
apprentices report for class instruction as 
and when notified to do so by the Director 
of Apprenticeship, unless the apprentice 
can satisfy the appropriate provincial body 
that he has mastered the standard skills 
and knowledge, at the level at which in- 
struction is being given" (L.G., July 1952. 
p. 877). The recommendation was referred 
to the Apprenticeship Training Advisory 
Committee for action. . 



Quebec Superior Labour 
Council Elects Officers 

Paul Lebel of Quebec has been re-elected 
President of the Quebec Superior Council 
of Labour. 

Mortimer Baker of Dominion Engineer- 
ing Company, Lachine, Que., and Roger 
Provost, President of the Quebec Provin- 
cial Federation of Labour (TLC), were 
elected Vice-Presidents. J. P. Deslierres 
was re-elected Secretary. 

Mr. Baker was also elected President of 
the Council's permanent committee set up 
to study the province's labour law with 
;t view of drawing up a labour code. 
Gerard Picard, President of the Canadian 



and Catholic Confederation of Labour, and 
Leonce Girard, President of the Party 
Committee of the Shoe Industry, were 
elected Vice-Presidents. 

Members of the permanent committee 
are: — 

For Labour: Philippe Vaillancourt, 
Regional Director of the Canadian Con- 
gress of Labour, and Jean Marchand, 
Secretary-General of the CCCL. 

For employers: J. A. Juneau, of Quebec, 
representing the Retail Merchants Asso- 
ciation; H. M. Sparks, Manager of the 
Industrial Relations Department of 
Northern Electric Company; and Jack 
Latter, of Anglo-Canadian Pulp and Paper 
Company, 

Representing economists and sociologists 
are Henri Ferron, of Three Rivers, an 
accountant, and Prof. H. D. Woods, 
Director of the Industrial Relations Council 
at McGill University. 



Technical Aid Answer to 
"Discontent" — Keenleyside 

Technical and economic aid is the solu- 
tion to the problem of the "determined 
discontent" that is sweeping over two-thirds 
of the people of the world, according to 
Hugh Keenleyside, Director General of 
the United Nations Technical Assistance 
Administration. He made the statement 
in an article in the December 6 issue of 
Saturday Night. 

Technical Assistance, states Mr. Keenley- 
side, is a program of mutual aid designed 
to enable the "fermenting and revolu- 
tionary areas of the world" to revitalize 
the basic elements of their national 
economies and become self-supporting. 

Today, according to the article, more 
than half the people in the world are 
illiterate. Half the people in the world 
are ill and expect to die before reaching 
the age of 35 years. Half the people in 
the world have an income of less than 
$100 a year. Most of the people in the 
world are hungry most of the time. 

Among the many needs of these people 
Mr. Keenleyside mentions simple, prac- 
tical help in producing more food, the 
clearing of malarial swamps, the division 
of land, help in finding markets, increased 
production in all its aspects, and the 
elements of political decency in practice. 

The Colombo Plan of the Common- 
wealth countries, the Point Four or Mutual 
Agency program of the United States, and 
the many programs of the United Nations 
and the Specialized Agencies are already 
attempting these forms of assistance. 



G7040— 3 : 



27 



Predicts Production Will 
Double in Next 25 Years 

Canada's national production may more 
than double in the next 25 years, according 
to Dr. 0. J. Firestone, Economic Adviser 
to the Department of Trade and Com- 
merce, in a recent address delivered to 
the Engineering Institute of Canada. Dr. 
Firestone estimated that the Canadian 
population would rise to more than 
23,000,000 in the same period. 

The increased production of aluminium, 
zinc, nickel, copper and asbestos was cited 
by Dr. Firestone, who also pointed out 
that a strong economy was based on 
expanding consumer purchasing power, 
bigger exports and increased investments in 
the economy. 



Most Industries Enlarge 
WorU Force in Decade 

More persons 14 years of age and over 
were employed in 1951 than a decade 
earlier in each of the 11 main classes of 
Canadian industry except agriculture and 
fishing and trapping, the Bureau of 
Statistics has reported in a 1951 Census 
bulletin detailing the labour force popula- 
tion by industry and sex for Canada and 
the provinces. 

The number of persons employed in agri- 
culture dropped by 255,044, or nearly 24 
per cent from 1,082,074 in 1941, to 827,030, 
while the number of those engaged in 
fishing and trapping was down slightly 
from 50,898 to 50,579. 

Largest numerical increase in the 10-year 
period was in the number of persons 
employed in manufacturing, which increased 
by 391,147 or over 40 per cent from 
969^515 to 1,360,662. Second largest gain 
was in the services group, which rose by 
283,891 or nearly 36 per cent from 793,574 
to 1,077,465, while the third largest was in 
the number of persons in trade, which rose 
by 241,806 or 52 per cent from 464,962 
to 706,768. 

The total labour force increased by 
1,090,202 or almost 26 per cent during the 
decade from 4,195,951 (excluding the 
Armed Services) in the nine provinces in 
1941 to 5,286,153 in the 10 provinces in 
1951. At the same time the total popula- 
tion rose by about 22 per cent. 

Largest percentage increase between 1941 
and 1951 was in the number of persons 
employed in the electricity, gas and water 
industry class, which rose by 36,208 or over 
141 per cent from 25,606 to 61,814. The 
number engaged in finance, insurance and 
real estate increased bv 54,315 or nearlv 



61 per cent from 89,680 to 143,995, while 
the number employed in construction rose 
by 130,675 or more than 59 per cent from 
220,221 to 350,896. 

During the decade the number employed 
in transportation, storage and communica- 
tion increased by 136,117 or 51 per cent 
from 266,590 to 402,707, the number 
engaged in forestry and logging by 36,036 
or more than 38 per cent from 93,796 to 
129,832, and the number employed in 
mining, quarrying and oil wells by 10,808 
or close to 12 per cent from 93,040 to 
103,848. 

Between 1941 and 1951 the proportion of 
the total labour force employed in agri- 
culture dropped from close to 26 per cent 
to less than 16 per cent, while the propor- 
tion employed in manufacturing increased 
from 23 per cent to almost 26 per cent. 
The proportion in the service class rose 
from almost 19 per cent to more than 20 
per cent; in trade, from 11 per cent to 
more than 13 per cent; in transportation, 
storage and communication, from more 
than six per cent to close to eight per cent ; 
in construction, from more than five per 
cent to almost seven per cent; in finance, 
insurance and real estate, from two per cent 
to nearly three per cent; and in forestry 
and logging, from 2-2 per cent to 2-45 per 
cent. In 1951, employment in mining, 
quarrying and oil wells accounted for about 
two per cent of the total labour force; the 
electricity, gas and water class for a little 
more than one per cent; and fishing and 
trapping for about one per cent. 



Montreal Fire Fighters 
Set up Health Scheme 

The Montreal local of the International 
Association of Fire Fighters (AFL-TLC) 
has established a. health co-operative to 
protect its members in case of illness or 
hospitalization. It is the second incursion 
of the Montreal fire fighters in the field 
of co-operatives. In 1945, they founded a 
savings bank whose assets now total more 
than one million dollars. 

The new health co-operative, founded in 
July under the Co-operative Syndicates Act 
of the Province of Quebec, has been in 
operation since November 1. 

To become a member, a fireman must 
purchase a $1 share and pay a monthly 
contribution of $1.50 for single men and 
$4.90 for family groups. In the case of a 
family, all children under 18 years of age 
are covered. 

Some 1,000 fire fighters have already 
joined. 



28 



II orkmen's i Compensation 
For Civil Defence Staffs 

Cost of extending full benefits of the 
provincial Workmen's Compensation Act 
to Ontario's civil defence workers is to 
be shared equally by the federal and 
provincial Governments, it was disclosed 
in Ottawa in a joint statement by Hon. 
Paul Martin, federal Minister in charge of 
civil defence, and Hon. G. Arthur Welsh, 
Ontario's Provincial Secretary. 

Mr. Martin noted that this agreement 
is the first such joint undertaking arising 
from Ottawa's offer to share costs of 
compensation which the provinces might 
agree to pay to anyone killed or injured 
while serving in official civil defence 
organizations. 

Mr. Martin said that the Ontario agree- 
ment covers persons training for, as well 
as actually engaged in, civil defence work. 
This is defined as "all measures, other than 
military, carried out under the direction of 
the provincial director of civil defence or 
any local civil defence authority, designed 
or intended to protect and preserve life, 
property and public services against any 
form of enemy attack and to minimize 
damage therefrom, and includes training." 

It is specified that any person duly 
enrolled and registered with the provincial 
director of civil defence qualifies for com- 
pensation while actually engaged in civil 
defence work. 



Seek Greater Uniformity 
in Apprentice Training 

With a view to bringing about more 
uniformity in apprenticeship standards, the 
Apprenticeship Training Advisory Com- 
mittee, at its November meeting, recom- 
mended that surveys of the machinist, 
carpentry, aircraft fitter mechanics, and 
motor mechanics trades be undertaken by 
the Vocational Training Branch of the 
federal Department of Labour. 

Greater uniformity in apprentice training, 
the Committee agreed, would do much to 
facilitate the exchange of trainees and 
mechanics within industrv. 



\nti-Discrimination Law 
In IV.Y. is Reviewed 

A review of the Ives-Quinn Law of the 
state of New York, which bars racial and 
religious discrimination in employment, is 
contained in the October issue of the 
Industrial Bulletin published by the state's 
Department of Labour. 

The author, Hon. Irving M. Ives, United 
States Senator, was one of the framers of 
the bill which became law in 1945. 

The Ives-Quinn Law, according to Mr. 
Ives, was the first in human history to 
make the flat declaration that : "The oppor- 
tunity to obtain employment without dis- 
crimination because of race, creed, colour 
or national origin is hereby recognized as 
and declared to be a civil right." 



On the U.S. Labour Scene 



David J. McDonald Named 
New SteelworUers 9 Chief 

David J. McDonald, International Sec- 
retary-Treasurer of the United Steelworkers 
of America (CIO) since its founding, has 
been nominated without opposition to 
succeed the late Philip Murray as President 
of the 1,100,000-member union. 

The nomination assures Mr. McDonald 
of election for a four-year term in the 
union's referendum February 10. 

Mr. McDonald was born on November 
22, 1902, in Pittsburgh. He began working 
at an early age and rose to the position 
of secretary to Philip Murray when the 
latter was a Vice-President of the United 
Mine Workers of America. He remained 
with Mr. Murray when the steel union 
was formed in 1936. 



Official Recommends End 
To U.S. Price Controls 

Complete suspension within 90 days of 
price controls on all consumer goods, 
including foods and excepting only 
petroleum, was suggested recently in a 
confidential memorandum to Economic 
Stabilizer Roger L. Putnam, according to 
Oscar E. Naumann writing in the New 
York Journal of Commerce. All wage con- 
trols should be dropped during this period, 
the document further suggests. 

The memorandum, written by Edward F. 
Phelps, Jr., Assistant Director of Price 
Stabilization, proposes a new principle of 
controls for certain basic materials and 
industrial goods which are directly related 
to the defence effort and to business costs. 
These include most primary steel, some 



29 



non-ferrous metals, certain types of 
machinery, sulphur and fertilizers, synthetic 
rubber, some hardwoods, crude oil and 
natural gas, surgical instruments and office, 
kitchen and hospital equipment. 

"Controls Not Justified" 

The memorandum suggests that "in the 
case of consumer goods and services, in- 
cluding food, it is substantially evident 
that price controls are not presently pro- 
ducing anti-inflationary results sufficient to 
justify their continuing use." 

With regard to wage controls, the memo 
states that "a strong mediation service will 
be more apropos than a wage stabilization 
function." 



AFL Ready to Settle for 
Taft-Hartley Amendment 

The AFL is now ready to settle for 
amendment rather than repeal of the 
Taft-Hartley Act, George Meany, the 
Federation's president, said in a radio talk 
recently. 

Conceding that the Republican victory in 
the United States elections had more or 
less halted the drive by organized labour 
for repeal, Mr. Meany said the AFL 
objective now was to obtain amendments 
that would make the Taft-Hartley law 
acceptable to labour. 



U.S. Unemployment Drops 
To New Post-War Low 

Unemployment in the United States 
dropped to a new post-war low in October. 

For the week ending October 11, it was 
estimated that 1-3 million persons were 
out-of-work, compared with 1-4 million the 
previous month and 1-6 million for 
October 1951. This October's unemployed 
constituted about two per cent of the total 
labour force, one of the lowest percentages 
on record except during the Second World 
War. 



One in Every 12 Persons 
In U.S. Aged Over 65 

About one in every 12 persons in the 
continental United States was 65 years of 
age or over on July 1, 1951, according to 
the Bureau of the Census. Fifty years ago, 
only one in every 25 was 65 years or over. 

In April 1950, when the 17th Census was 
taken, there were 12,269,538 persons in the 



65-years-and-over category. In April 1940, 
when the 16th Census was taken, there 
were 9,019,314 persons 65 years of age 
and over. 

While the total population increased by 
about 16-5 per cent in the 11-year period 
between April 1940, and July 1951, the 
65-and-over group increased by about 41-5 
per cent, about two-and-a-half times as 
fast. 



Employment Improves 
In Major U.S. Marhets 

Most metropolitan labour markets in the 
United States are currently being reclassi- 
fied upwards from areas with moderate 
labour surpluses to areas with a balanced 
labour supply. General improvement in 
employment and in economic conditions is 
given credit for the upgrading. 

According to Maurice Tobin, Secretary 
of Labour, a favourable economic climate 
prevails in most big cities. Taking the 
city of Detroit as an example, Mr. Tobin 
said : — 

"A year ago unemployment in Detroit 
was mounting rapidly as a result of cut- 
backs in materials for the auto industry. 
At that time it became a labour surplus 
area; but now, with unemployment nearing 
post-war lows, there appears to be an 
impending labour shortage in Detroit rather 
than a possibility of any labour surplus." 



Builders' Wage Scales Up 
1 . 3 Per Cent in Quarter 

Wage scales of union workers in the 
building construction industry advanced 
1-3 per cent between July 1, 1952, and 
October 1, 1952, compared with a rise of 
•7 per cent in the corresponding period 
of 1951. 

These figures resulted from a survey by 
the Bureau of Labour Statistics, United 
States Department of Labour, of seven 
major building trades in 85 cities. About 
one-fifth of the 585,000 building trades 
workers in the country were covered in 
the survey. 

The Bureau's estimate of the average 
hourly wage scale of unionized building 
trades workers on October 1, 1952, was 
$2.6.0, a rate 31 cents an hour above the 
level of July 3, 1950, and 39 cents above 
that of January 3, 1950. 

The following were the range of rates 
for the main crafts in the building trades 
at October 1, 1952: bricklayers, $2.50 to 
$3.65; carpenters, $2.16 to $3.45; painters, 



30 



$1.65 to $2.83; plasterers, $2.25 to $3.65; 
plumbers, $2.19 to $3.25; and building 
labourers, 90 cents to $2.56. 

The spread between the minimums and 
the maximums for each craft largely results 
from the wage differentials existing between 
the north and the south. 



Step Up Enforcement of 
Non-Communist Provision 

Two recent developments indicate an 
increased interest by the National Labour 
Relations Board in the enforcement of the 
provision in the Taft-Hartley Act requiring 
union officials to sign non-Communist 
affidavits. Since passage of the Act five 
years ago, the Government had previously 
made little effort to prosecute for viola- 
tions of this provision. 

The NLRB has withdrawn its recognition 
for one local union and threatened the same 
penalty for four others and has said it will 
study a statement by the federal Grand 
Jury in New York requesting the removal 
of collective bargaining rights from four 
international unions. 

Both developments follow closely the 
first conviction registered against a union 



officer for filing a false non-Communist 
affidavit. A United States District Court 
recently convicted Anthony Valentino. 
business agent for several unions in Newark. 
N.J., on this charge. 

Three of the unions served by Mr. 
Valentino were locals of the Food and 
Tobacco Workers Union, one of the 11 
unions expelled several years ago by the 
CIO for following the Communist Party 
line. Another was a local of the United 
Packinghouse Workers of America (CIO). 

The New York Grand Jury requested 
removal of collective bargaining rights 
from the United Electrical, Radio and 
Machine Workers of America; the American 
Communications Association, the Fur and 
Leather Workers Union; and the Distribu- 
tive, Processing and Office Workers Union. 
The first three are former CIO affiliates; 
the fourth, a new composite union of 
several expelled CIO affiliates. 

Under the Taft-Hartley Act, an officer of 
a labour union must file with the NLRB his 
sworn statement that he is not a member 
of the Communist Party and that he does 
not support any organization that believes 
in the overthrow of the Government by 
unconstitutional methods. 



Extracts from Hansard of Interest to Labour 



Voluntary Revocable Check-off 

November 24 

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North 
Centre) moved for leave to introduce Bill 
No. 2, to amend the Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act (voluntary 
revocable check-off). 

Motion agreed to and bill read the first 
time. 

Fair Employmeni Practices 

November 24 

Mrs. Ellen L. Fairclough (Hamilton 
West) moved for leave to introduce Bill 
No. 4, to promote fair employment prac- 
tices in Canada. 

Motion agreed to and bill read the first 
time. 

Old Age Pensions 

November 24 
Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North 
Centre) : Can the Prime Minister say when 
the former Old Age Pensions Act will be 
repealed so that provinces like Manitoba, 
which are pressing needy pensioners to 



make repayment and which are still 
making recoveries out of the estates of 
deceased pensioners, can discontinue this 
practice? 

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime 
Minister) : The matter of repealing the 
Old Age Pensions Act is one about which 
there is correspondence between this Gov- 
ernment and the provincial governments. 
As that correspondence is being conducted 
on our behalf by the Department of 
National Health and Welfare, perhaps the 
parliamentary assistant would be able to 
tell the hon. gentleman just what stage 
it has reached at this time. 

Mr. E. A. McCusker (Parliamentary 

Assistant to the Minister of National 
Health and Welfare) : It is the intention 
of the Government to proclaim the repeal 
of the Old Age Pensions Act as soon as 
there is agreement from the provinces 
which co-sponsored this Act that this 
should be done. Not all of the provinces 
have yet agreed on the desirability of 
repeal at this time, but it is hoped that 
agreement will be reached shortly so that 
the necessary proclamation can be made. 



31 



Civil Service 5-Day Week 

December 1 

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North 
Centre) : Will Winnipeg be included with 
Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver as a city 
where the year round five-day week will 
be established for certain branches of the 
Civil Service according to the letter from 
the Minister of Finance which was tabled 
in this house on Friday? 

Hon. Stuart S. Garson (Acting Minister 
of Finance) : At the present time the 
Treasury Board does not contemplate the 
extension of the five-day week to govern- 
ment employees in Winnipeg. The advice 
received by the officers of the Board's staff 
from the Civil Service Commission is to 
the effect that the five-day week is not 
sufficiently predominant among private 
employers and employees in Winnipeg that 
it is necessary to extend it to the govern- 
ment staffs in that city. 

Printing of Canada Savings Bonds 

December 3 
Mr. Howard Meeker (Waterloo South) : 
Is the Acting Minister of Finance aware 
of the fact that job printing work in 
connection with the recent Canada savings 
bond issue was done in the United States? 
Why was this, and can the minister assure 
this house that Canadian printers will be 
given an opportunity to do this work in 
the future? 

December 4 

Hon. Stuart S. Garson (Acting Minister 
of Finance). The answer is as follows: It 
is not true, as the hon. member's question 
states, that job printing work in connection 
with the recent Canada savings bond issue 
was done in the United States. As part 
of their sales promotion program the pay- 
roll savings organization in Ontario pur- 
chased bulletin blanks from a firm in 
Stamford, Connecticut. These bulletin 
blanks were not printed to order and do 
not constitute job printing. Six thousand 
four hundred and fifty of these blanks were 
purchased at a cost of $206.99. To have 
charged the art work and lithographing 
plates against an order of this size in 
Canada would have cost many times more 
than this figure. 

Approximately $102,000 has been spent 
for printing forms and publicity material 
for the seventh series of Canada savings 
bonds, all of which, with the exception 
of the bulletin blanks, has been spent in 
Canada, so that the cost of these blanks 
represents about 1 /500th part of the total 
amount expended. 



National Advisory Council on Manpower 

December 1 1 

Mr. Howard C. Green (Vancouver- 
Quadra) : I should like to ask the parlia- 
mentary assistant to the Minister of 
Labour if there have been any resigna- 
tions from the National Advisory Council 
on Manpower. If so, what members have 
resigned, and will a statement be made in 
regard thereto? 

Mr. Paul E. Cote (Parliamentary 
Assistant to the Minister of Labour) : Mr. 
Speaker, I wish to thank my hon. friend 
for having given me notice of his question. 
Two resignations have been received by the 
Council, one from one of the two lady 
members representing the women of 
Canada, Mrs. de la Durantaye. She has 
been replaced by Mrs. Flore Jutras, Mont- 
real. The other resignation was received 
from Mr. Rhys M. Sale, President of the 
Ford Motor Company, one of the repre- 
sentatives of employers. I am not aware 
that he has been replaced yet. 

Employment Age Limit 

December 1 1 
Mr. J. W. Noseworthy (York South) : I 
should like to direct a question to the 
Minister of Defence Production. It arises 
out of an advertisement in the Toronto 
Telegram by Canadian Arsenals Limited, a 
copy of which I have sent to the Minister. 
Will the Minister, in the light of the 
Department of Labour's request to private 
enterprise to hire people over 45, explain 
why Canadian Arsenals Limited, a crown 
company, is setting an age limit of 35 years 
for new employees? 

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of 
Defence Production) : I must say that 
when I read the advertisement I was as 
shocked as was my hon. friend. I have 
made inquiries. No good reason has been 
advanced for specifying an age limit except 
that the aptitude of people under 35 for 
this particular kind of work seems to be 
better than that of people over that age. 
I have given instructions that employment 
shall be given on the basis of adaptability 
without discrimination as to age. 

Merchant Seamen Compensation Act 

December 15 

Hon. Alphonse Fournier (for the Min- 
ister of Labour) moved the first reading 
of Bill No. 46 (from the Senate), to amend 
the Merchant Seamen Compensation Act. 

Motion agreed to and bill read the first 
time. 



32 



Organization of White-Collar Workers 
in Canadian Manufacturing Industries 

Almost 10 per cent of white-collar workers in Canadian manufacturing 
industries surveyed by Department of Labour in October, 1951, were 
in collective bargaining units and covered by collective agreements 



The history of labour unions in the 
Canadian manufacturing industries has been 
almost entirely linked with craftsmen and 
plant workers. Only in the past decade 
liave significant numbers of office workers 
become organized; unions having jurisdic- 
tion solely over office workers have been 
formed and a number of the unions which 
previously drew their membership from 
among non-office employees are now taking 
white-collar workers into membership. 

Union organization among office workers 
has now reached proportions of some 
significance, as evidenced by the increasing 
number of such workers covered by 
collective agreements. Close to 10 per cent 
of the white-collar workers in the Cana- 
dian manufacturing industries surveyed by 
the Department of Labour in October 1951, 
are included in collective bargaining units 
and covered by agreements. While this 
percentage is small in comparison with the 
almost 50 per cent of plant workers in 
manufacturing found to be under collective 
agreements in the same survey, it repre- 
resents a substantial advance in the last 
decade. 

The slowness of office workers to organize, 
in comparison with plant workers, can be 
attributed to a number of factors, most of 
which are not peculiar to manufacturing 
but apply to industry generally. 

Fifty years ago, office workers generally 
commanded substantially better working 
conditions than production employees. 
Clerical staffs were small and, as a rule, 
closely associated with management, a situ- 
ation which not only contributed to better 
working conditions for the white-collar 
group but made them feel more closely 
identified with management than with 
labour. 

Developments of the past half century, 
however, have changed the conditions of 
office work. As industrial units have 
expanded, office staffs have grown larger 
and many clerical jobs have become routine 
and mechanical in nature. At the same 
time, non-office workers have made rapid 
gains in employment conditions, and many 



This study of office worker unions, pre- 
pared by the Economics and Research 
Branch, Department of Labour, applies 
to the manufacturing industries of 
Canada. A study of organization of 
white-collar workers in other industries 
will be issued and an analysis of their 
collective agreements made at a later 
date, it is hoped. 



of the advantages formerly associated with 
office employees now apply equally to plant 
workers. During the past 10 or 15 years, 
clerical employees have undoubtedly 
become more receptive than previously to 
unionization. 

One obstacle to the unionization of 
white-collar workers is the high proportion 
of women doing office work. Since many 
women regard their employment as 
temporary, they often show little response 
to the long-range goals of unions. A 
survey of manufacturing establishments 
conducted by the Dominion Bureau of 
Statistics in the last week of October 1951, 
shows that, whereas only 21 per cent of 
the hourly-rated wage earners were women, 
the proportion of female office workers was 
42 per cent (excluding managerial and 
professional employees). 

The unionization of office workers is still 
at an early stage. It appears, however, 
that the success so far attained will bring 
about increased organizing activity among 
office workers in the future. 

Type of Union Representing Office Workers 

In the annual survey of wages and 
working conditions by the Economics and 
Research Branch, it was found that, as of 
October 1, 1951, 174 of the 6,500 manu- 
facturing establishments surveyed reported 
the existence of collective agreements 
covering office staffs. These agreements 
applied to nearly 14,000 of the 156,000 
office workers included in the survey. 

Most of the office workers under agree- 
ment were organized in bargaining units 
separate from the plant workers' unit. 



33 



However, these units were frequently part 
of the same union that represented the 
plant employees. For example, the United 
Automobile Workers represents both plant 
and office workers of the Ford Company 
of Canada at Windsor. But these two 
groups are organized in separate locals and 
the union has signed a separate collective 
agreement for each. 

As shown in Table 1, production worker 
unions in manufacturing have negotiated 
36 agreements, applying to more than 6.000 
office workers. 

Unions made up wholly of office and 
clerical workers, on the other hand, have 
signed 39 agreements, but these appby to 
less than half as many workers. 

Of the office worker unions, the Inter- 
national Union of Office Employees (AFL- 
TLC) has signed the most agreements (33). 
The Office and Professional Workers 
Organizing Committee (CCL) had not at 



the time of the survey any contracts in 
the manufacturing industries. Its mem- 
bership is chiefly among clerical employees 
of union offices. The remaining six agree- 
ments in manufacturing negotiated bj r 
office worker unions were signed by the 
American Newspaper Guild (CIO-CCL). 
These six agreements cover relatively large 
groups of workers. 

Some production worker unions have 
lumped together into a single bargaining 
unit both production and office employees. 
Where such "mixed" bargaining units exist, 
grouping office and non-office personnel, 
plant workers far outnumber office workers. 
The latter comprise small office staffs or 
employees working at such jobs as time 
keepers or equipment clerks in the plants. 
The 1,100 office workers belonging to 
"mixed" bargaining units are scattered 
through 76 establishments, or 44 per cent 
of the total number of establishments in 



TABLE 1.— OFFICE WORKERS UNDER AGREEMENT— BY UNION 

Number of establishments in which office workers are organized and number of office workers in the 

bargaining units 

Manufacturing Industries of Canada — 1951 



Union 


Number of 
Office 

Establish- 
ments 


Number of 

Office 
Workers 

in the 
Bargaining 

Units 


Office Worker Bargaining Units — 
Office Worker Unions — 

International Union of Office Employees, AFL — TLC 


33 
6 


1,668 


American Newspaper Guild, CIO — CCL 


1,225 






Total — Office Worker Unions 


39 

3 

9 
5 

2 
5 

2 
5 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 


2,893 


Production Worker Unions — 

International Association of Machinists, AFL — TLC 


2 354 


International Union of United Automobile, Aircraft and Agricultural 
Implement Workers of America, CIO — CCL 


1 , 540 


United Steel Workers of America, CIO— CCL 


761 


International Union of Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers, 
CIO— CCL 


687 


United Mine Workers of America, CCL 


180 


International Union of United Rubber, Cork, Linoleum and Plastic 
Workers of America, CIO— CCL 


162 


National Federation of Pulp and Paper Workers Inc., CCCL 


144 


The Outboard Marine Workers, CCL 


73 


United Gas, Coke and Chemical Workers of America, CIO — CCL . . . 
United Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, AFL — TLC 


65 
22 


International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, 
AFL— TLC 


21 


United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America — In- 
dependent 


18 






Total — Production Worker Unions 


36 

23 
76 


6,027 


Employees Associations 


3,822 


Mixed Plant and Office Worker Bargaining Units 


1,138 






Total— All Unions 


174 


13,880 







34 



which white-collar workers are organized; 
but they constitute only eight per cent of 
the total number of office workers covered 
by collective agreements. 

In addition to the unions active in the 
white-collar field, there are a number of 
independent employee associations. Here, 
again, the two categories of employees, 
office and non-office, may or may not 
bargain together. For the most part, these 
employee associations are found in elec- 
trical apparatus and supplies manufacturing 
establishments in the province of Quebec. 

Of the total of 14,000 office workers 
covered by agreement, approximately 45 
per cent are in office units established by 
production worker unions, 25 per cent are 
in units organized by employee associa- 
tions, 20 per cent are under agreements 
made with office worker unions, and less 
than 10 per cent are under mixed bar- 
gaining agreements covering both office 
workers and plant workers. 

Two unions, the United Auto Workers 
(CIO-CCL) and the International Associa- 
tion of Machinists (AFL-TLC), account 
for more than half of the number of office 
workers covered by production worker 
unions. One local of the UAW represents 
about 1,000 office workers while one local 
of the I AM bargains for approximately 
2,000 office workers. 

Geographical Distribution 

All provinces, except Prince Edward 
Island, have unionized office workers. 
However, almost 90 per cent of the total 
number of office workers covered by 
collective agreements are concentrated in 
Ontario and Quebec. The former prov- 
ince accounts for about 60 per cent of 
organized office workers; Quebec, 30 per 
cent; British Columbia, 6 per cent; New- 
foundland, 3 per cent; the remaining prov- 
inces make up the other one per cent. 

So far, the organization work of produc- 
tion worker unions among office employees 
has been almost exclusively in Ontario, this 
province accounting for about 95 per cent 
of the workers covered by this type of 
union. In contrast, approximately 80 per 
cent of the office workers represented by 
employee associations are located in 
Quebec, while 15 per cent are in Ontario. 
Almost half of the office worker unions' 
coverage is in Ontario, the rest being as 
follows: British Columbia (23 per cent), 
Quebec (14 per cent), Newfoundland (14 
per cent), New Brunswick (3 per cent), 
and Manitoba (1 per cent). 



Industrial Distribution 

Of the total number of office workers 
covered by agreements in the manufactur- 
ing industries, 26 per cent work in the 
transportation equipment industry and 25 
per cent in the electrical apparatus and 
supplies industry (see Table 3). The 
printing, publishing and allied industries 
have 13 per cent of the organized white- 
collar workers; paper products, 12 per 
cent; iron and steel products, 11 per cent; 
and chemical products, four per cent. The 
remaining nine per cent are distributed 
among the following manufacturing indus- 
tries: foods and beverages, rubber, 
leather, textiles, clothing, wood, non-ferrous 
metal, non-metallic mineral products, and 
petroleum and coal products. 

Approximately 85 per cent of the total 
number of organized office workers in the 
trasportation equipment industry are in 
two large bargaining units, both in Ontario. 
Office workers at these two establishments 
are represented by the United Automobile 
Workers (CIO-CCL) and the International 
Association of Machinists (AFL-TLC) 
respectively. One is an automobile manu- 
facturing plant, the other an aircraft plant. 

In the electrical apparatus and supplies 
industry, about 80 per cent of the office 
workers covered by collective agreements 
are represented by large employee associa- 
tions of Quebec firms. Nearly all of the 
remaining 20 per cent are included under 
agreements signed by the International 
Union of Electrical Workers (CIO-CCL) 
and are located at two Ontario plants. 
The office workers of three newspaper 
publishing companies, one in Ontario and 
two in British Columbia, making up 
almost 60 per cent of the total in the 
printing, publishing and allied industries, 
are represented by the American News- 
paper Guild (CIO-CCL). 

Most of the organized office personnel 
in the iron and steel industry are in three 
Ontario plants manufacturing agricultural 
implements; they are represented by the 
United Steel Workers (CIO-CCL). 

The membership of the Office Employees' 
International Union (AFL-TLC) is con- 
centrated largely in the pulp and paper 
industry, a good proportion of whose office 
personnel is now organized. While only 
12 per cent of all office personnel covered 
by union agreements are employed in the 
pulp and paper industry, there are more 
office worker bargaining units in this 
industry than in any other in the manu- 
facturing group. 



35 





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37 



Salaries of Clerical Employees in 

Canadian Manufacturing Industry 



Office workers' salary gains from October, 1949, to October, 1951, 
were not quite as substantial as production workers' wage increases 



The typical clerical worker employed in 
Canadian manufacturing enjoyed salary 
gains between October 1949, and October 
1951, but his increases were not quite as 
substantial as those given to production 
workers. 

Based on the reports of more than 7,000 
establishments employing more than 60,000 
in clerical occupations {see table), the 
average increase in office workers' salaries, 
in comparative terms, was 4-2 per cent 
between 1949 and 1950 and 13-0 per cent 
during the next 12 months. During the 



same periods, wage rates of production 
and maintenance staffs rose 5-9 and 13-4 
per cent* 

A preliminary examination of wage 
increases for office personnel in the year 
ending October 1952, based on the reports 
of 50 of the largest firms in manufacturing, 



*In some establishments, gains in office 
salaries may have equalled or even exceeded 
the gain in production wages but, despite 
the similarity in trend, the over-all average 
increases have apparenlty not been quite as 
substantial. 



WEEKLY SALARIES OF OFFICE EMPLOYEES IN MANUFACTURING, CANADA 
OCTORER, 1949, 1950 AND 1951 



Occupation 



Accounting and Bookkeeping Clerk, Male. . . 
Accounting and Bookkeeping Clerk, Female 

Bookkeeper, Male 

Bookkeeper, Female 

Junior Bookkeeper, Male 

Junior Bookkeeper, Female 

Clerk-Typist, Female 

Cost Clerk, Male 

Cost Clerk, Female 

General Office Clerk, (All Types), Male . . . 
General Office Clerk, (All Types), Female. . 

General Office Clerk, Senior, Male 

General Office Clerk 

General Office Clerk 

General Office Clerk 

General Office Clerk 

General Office Clerk 

General Office Clerk 

General Office Clerk 
Office Appliance Operator 



Senior, Female 

Intermediate, Male 

Intermediate, Female 

Junior, Male 

Junior, Female 

(Not Classified), Male 

(Not Classified), Female. 
, (All Types), Female 



Calculating Machine Operator, Female. . . . 

Bookkeeping Machine Operator, Female. . . 

Billing Machine Operator, Female 

Office Machine Operator, (Other), Female. 

Payroll Clerk, Male 

Payroll Clerk, Female 

Secretary, Female 

Stenographer, Female 

Stock Record Clerk, Male 

Stock Record Clerk, Female 

Telephone Switchboard Operator, Female 

Typist, Female 



Average Weekly Salary 



1949 



45.11 



46.62 
36.95 



29.51 
47.99 
32.43 
44.30 
30.36 



33.06 
33.38 
33.83 
30.64 



43.42 
32.39 
41.80 
33.41 
44.80 
31.17 
30 90 
29.34 



1950 



48.31 
34.51 
49.05 
38.32 
38.08 
32.41 
31.07 
48.79 
34.14 
46.99 
31.40 
59.91 
40.33 
45.58 
34.24 
29.87 
27.46 
46.30 
30.90 
34.73 
35.84 
35.41 
31.39 
34.14 
44.78 
33.02 
43.48 
34.37 
45.77 
31.79 
31.57 
30.43 



1951 



$ 

55.65 
35.00 
53.62 
41.58 
46.42 
35.98 
35.27 
57.60 
40.15 
53.04 
35.63 
66.67 
46.07 
51 . 19 
38.58 
35.39 
31.56 
51.64 
35.12 
38.59 
40.02 
39.71 
34.80 
37.49 
51 . 28 
37.41 
48.69 
38.90 
50.22 
34.93 
35.69 
34.91 



Note: — Any monthly salaries reported were changed to weekly, using 4f weeks per month as a 
conversion factor. 



38 



indicates that gains in average salaries for 
representative occupations varied, for the 
most part, from 4 to 12 per cent. 

The table shows that, in 1951, of nine 
male occupational classes, all but junior 
clerks and junior bookkeepers averaged 
more than $50 a week. Senior clerks were 
the most highly paid group, averaging 
more than $66 a week, followed by cost 
clerks and accounting clerks, in that order, 
who received, on the average, about $9 and 
$11 less. 

Of 18 female job categories, only secre- 
taries received an average salary exceeding 



$50 a week in 1951. Senior clerks, book- 
keepers, cost clerks and calculating machine 
operators averaged more than $40. Junior 
clerks were at the opposite end of the 
salary scale, averaging $31.56. Billing 
machine operators, typists and stock record 
clerks ranked slightly higher, receiving 
around $35 on the average. 

It is not known to what extent the 
differences in salaries for male and female 
workers in the same occupational classifica- 
tion result from differences in duties 
performed. 



Working Conditions of Office Workers Improve 

Although White-collar Unions Few — U.S. Survey 



As far as working conditions and fringe 
benefits are concerned, office workers in 
the manufacturing industry in the United 
States are doing as well as, or better than, 
the plant workers although fewer of them 
belong to unions, according to a Bureau 
of National Affairs survey conducted 
recently in Cleveland, Ohio. In most cases, 
office staffs share in benefits won by factory 
personnel through collective bargaining. 

These factors are a possible reason why 
the number of white-collar unions is com- 
paratively small: only 4-8 per cent of the 
companies surveyed had such unions. 

Furthermore, the 1952 annual survey of 
clerical rates recently published by the 
Commerce and Industry Association of 
New York, Inc., reveals that the floor on 
salaries paid to white-collar workers in that 
city is moving up. Clerical salaries as a 
whole have risen over the levels of 
October 1951, in 458 companies in New 
York City employing 71,604 office workers. 
And although the trend is general among 
clerks, typists, office boys, messengers, 
stenographers and secretaries, the highest 
rate of increase has been at the lower 
salary levels. 

The Cleveland survey covers 287 man- 
agements employing 45,289 office workers 
in that city. Of these, 50 manufacturers, 
or 17-1 per cent, reported they required 
less than an 8-hour day of their office 
staffs. A large number reported a work 
day of between seven and 7^ hours. 

A total of 250 companies, or 87-1 per 
cent, reported their offices were either 
closed on Saturday or that only some 
employees worked that day. Only 25, or 
8-7 per cent, required their office staffs to 
work the full day. 



While most factory employees are 
docked for lateness, only 29 managements, 
or about 10 per cent, reported that their 
office employees lost pay when late. 

Of the companies interviewed, 68-2 per 
cent declared they had no age limit for 
new office workers. 

Group insurance protection for their office 
staffs was reported by 213 or 74-2 per cent 
of the companies surveyed. Of these, 132 
share expenses with the workers, 73 pay 
the entire cost and 58 companies give 
uniform insurance protection to all workers 
regardless of income or position. Accident 
insurance is provided by 53 companies who 
pay the full cost and 79 others who provide 
it on a contributory basis. Total cost of 
hospitalization is paid by 52 companies and 
shared with employees by another 53. The 
hospitalization plans of 43 companies cover 
a worker's dependents automatically. Fifty- 
six companies provide surgical insurance, 
48 of them on a contributory basis. These 
insurance plans are in effect mostly in the 
larger firms. 

Like the plant worker, the office employee 
gets six paid holidays a year, but eligibility 
requirements are lower. In 153 companies, 
or 53-3 per cent of those surveyed, holi- 
day money is paid office workers as soon 
as they are on the payroll. In 164 com- 
panies, leave of absence for indefinite 
periods is granted. 

Most firms where factory workers get 
three weeks vacation after a certain 
number of years reported the same holiday 
plan for office workers. Nineteen com- 
panies said they have no further eligibility 
requirements for two weeks after one year 
of service. 

(Continued on page 98) 



39 



Normal Work Week Analysed 
by Size of Establishment 

in Canadian Manufacturing 



Proportion of workers on five-day week tends to increase with size of 
establishment, analysis shows. Only half of reporting establishments 
with fewer than 25 employees are on five-day week but three-quarters 
of those having more than 1,000 workers are following that schedule. 



An analysis made recently by the 
Economics and Research Branch, Depart- 
ment of Labour, of the normal work week 
in the manufacturing industries by size of 
establishment shows a tendency for larger 
establishments to have shorter working 
hours. The analysis is based on returns 
submitted by 6,600 plants engaged in 
manufacturing activity, as part of the 
Branch's annual survey of wages and work- 
ing conditions in Canadian industry. The 
date of the survey was October 1951* 



The analysis also indicates that in the 
manufacturing industries the proportion of 
workers on the five-day week tends to 
increase with the size of the establishment. 

The establishments making returns in the 
annual survey consist largely of those 
employing 15 or more persons. For pur- 
poses of the present study, the 6,600 plants 
were distributed among seven size groups. 
The proportion of establishments and of 
plant workers in each of these size groups 
is as follows:- — 



Size of Establishment 

(Number of Plant Employees) 

Fewer than 25 


Per Cent of Total 
Establishments 
32-2 


Per 
Pk 


Cent of Total 
mt Employees 
3-6 


25-49 


22-3 


6-6 


50-99 


20-1 


12-0 


100-199 


12-7 


14-9 


200-499 


8-4 


21-5 


500-999 


2-9 


16-9 


1.000 and more 


1-4 


24-5 










100-0 


100-0 



The table on page 41 gives details on 
the length of the work week in establish- 
ments in each of these size groups. 
Examination of this table reveals con- 
siderable variations as between the 
different size categories. Of particular 
interest are the figures for the five-day 
week and the 40-hour week. 

In studying the data in the table, it 
should be borne in mind that the unit 



*Further information on the normal work 
week derived from this survey has been 
published in the Labour Gazette for June 
(p. 708), September (p. 1191), and October 
(p. 1307). 



being dealt with is "establishment" as 
distinguished from "firm". Some firms 
comprise a number of establishments and 
the work-week polic}' in these may be 
determined at the company level rather 
than by the units themselves. About one- 
fourth of the establishments upon which 
this study is based are branch plants of 
firms submitting at least two separate 
returns to the survey. The proportions 
shown, therefore, may be influenced by 
this factor; in effect, it might tend to 
magnify the proportions of the smaller 
sized establishments operating on a five- 
day, or a 40-hour, week. 



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41 



Five-Day Week 

The proportion of establishments having 
the five-day week increases with each 
successive size group, with one notable 
exception: — 



Size of Establishment 
( Number of Plant 

Employees) 
Fewer than 25 
25- 49 
50- 99 
100-199 
200-499 
500-999 
1,000 and more 



Per Cent of Estab- 
lishments on 
Five-day Week 
49-6 
58-1 
64-6 
69-0 
72-4 
64-6 
74-4 



It will be noted that only half the estab- 
lishments with fewer than 25 employees 
are on a five-day week but that the propor- 
tion rises to three-quarters in the case of 
establishments having 1,000 or more 
workers. 

On the other hand, a comparatively low 
proportion of the establishments in the 
size group 500 to 999 employees are on the 
five-day week. Examination of the estab- 
lishments in this size group reveals that 



it contains a high proportion of firms in 
the pulp and paper industry in which the 
48-hour week is prevalent. This fact tends 
to modif}' the trend otherwise found that 
the five-day week is more common in larger 
than in smaller establishments. 

Forty-Hour Week 

The analysis shows that the 40-hour week 
is slightly more common in establishments 
with fewer than 25 employees than it is 
in establishments with 25 to 100 workers. 
On the other hand, an appreciably larger 
proportion of the establishments with 500 
or more workers are on the 40-hour week 
and a still larger proportion are in the 
category with 1,000 and more employees. 



Size of Establishment 
(Number of Plant 

Employees) 
Fewer than 25 
25- 49 
50- 99 
100-199 
200-499 
500-999 
1,000 and more 



Per Cent of Estab- 
lishments on 
40-hour Week 
28-1 
27-5 
24-4 
28-4 
30-5 
37-0 
46-8 



PERCENTAGE OF ESTABLISHMENTS ON 5-DAY AND 40-HOUR WEEK 
GROUPED BY SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT 

Manufacturing Industries of Canada, October 1951 



5-DAY WEEK 



40 - 

30 
20 
10 



40-HOUR WEEK 



Per Cent 



1 


25 


50 


100 


200 


500 


1000 


1 


25 


50 


100 


200 


500 


1000 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


and 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


and 


24 


49 


99 


199 


499 


1000 


Over 


24 


49 


99 


199 


499 


1000 


Over 



SIZE OF ESTABLISHMENT (NUMBER OF PLANT EMPLOYEES) 



42 



It will be noted that a much higher 
proportion of manufacturing establishments 
have the five-day week than the 40-hour 
week. In a general way, the trends in the 
figures for the five-day week and the 40- 



hour week resemble one another, in that 
both reveal a greater incidence among the 
larger establishments. The trends are not 
closely similar, however. 



10th Federal-Provincial Conference 

on Farm Labour Held in Ottawa 



Delegates report movements of farm workers again successfully carried 
out in 1952, farmers generally satisfied with workers they received. 
Federal Government willing to continue joint farm labour program in 
1953 if provinces so wish, Deputy Minister Arthur MacNamara indicates 



Movements of workers under the farm 
labour program were again successfully 
carried out in 1952. Delegates to the 10th 
Federal-Provincial Farm Labour conference 
at Ottawa, December 3-5, reported that 
farmers generally were satisfied with the 
workers they received. 

The quality of immigrant farm workers 
was higher than in previous years but 
trouble was again experienced through 
failure of a number to carry out their 
undertaking to remain on the farm for 
the required 12-month period. 

AVillingness on the part of the federal 
Government to continue the joint farm 
labour program for another year if the 
provinces so desire was indicated by Dr. 
Arthur MacNamara, Deputy Minister of 
Labour. Most of the delegates were of 
the opinion that their governments would 
enter into agreements for 1953 should the 
plan be continued. 

The three-day conference was attended 
by directors of farm labour and other 
officials from all provinces except New- 
foundland. W. W. Dawson, Director, 
Special Services Branch of the Depart- 
ment of Labour, presided. 

Also in attendance were officials of the 
National Employment Service, the federal 
Departments of Agriculture, Citizenship and 
Immigration, and Labour; and representa- 
tives of the Canadian Federation of Agri- 
culture, the United Kingdom High Com- 
missioner's office, the Netherlands Embassy, 
and the United States Employment 
Service. 

Main items on the agenda were : reports 
of provincial directors of farm labour and 
regional employment officers on the past 



year's activities, regional changes in farm- 
ing methods and their relation to labour 
requirements, manpower outlook for 1953, 
farm labour program for 1953, and immi- 
gration program. 

Address of Dr. Arthur MacNamara 

Welcoming the official representatives, 
Dr. Arthur MacNamara, Deputy Minister 
of Labour, said the federal-provincial farm 
labour program has a history of which all 
can be proud. It has brought into the 
picture, he said, the Department of Labour 
and the National Employment Service ; but 
if it had not been for the co-operation of 
the Department of Citizenship and Immi- 
gration and the Department of Agriculture, 
it would not have been possible to carry 
out the program. 

The Deputy Minister said he did not 
know of anything in his field that has 
worked better for the farmers. In 1952, 
the wheat crop was the biggest ever 
harvested in Western Canada and he 
doubted if there had been fifty complaints 
of farmers being short of labour. 

If it is the wish of the provinces that 
the farm labour program be continued for 
another year, and if they so recommend, 
the federal Government, he was sure, would 
be willing to enter into agreements with the 
provinces for 1953. 

Provincial Directors' Reports 

Prince Edward Island — Labour require- 
ments in the province, it was reported, were 
lower in 1952 than in previous years. 
Fewer workers were needed for pulpwood 
operations and so more labour was obtain- 
able local'v. 



43 



The first seasonal movement consisted of 
27 men to assist with the hay crop. The 
men were very satisfactory and many 
remained throughout the summer and fall. 
Potato harvesting requirements were lower 
than in former years, because of fine 
weather and the use of more mechanical 
pickers; only 504 vacancies were filled, 280 
of which were brought into the province. 
Immigrant farm workers generally had 
proved satisfactory. Under the assisted 
passage plan, 36 German nationals were 
placed in the province. An additional 
number was placed through the Depart- 
ment of Immigration. Some of these 
immigrants did not have previous farm 
experience but were willing to work and 
anxious to learn all they could. At least 
eight single men and two families from 
The Netherlands were placed during the 
year; all gave excellent service. 

Two factors present difficulty in the 
placement of workers on the farm, it was 
explained. One is the lack of living 
accommodation for a married man with a 
family and the other is that additional help 
is required for only six or seven months 
of the year. Many farmers cannot afford 
to pay for additional help during the 
winter months; the livestock population is 
small and many farmers are able to carry 
on alone. 

Nova Scotia — There was a brisk demand 
in the province for farm labour early in 
the spring and requirements could not be 
satisfied locally. Under the assisted passage 
plan, a group of workers arrived from West 
Germany and most of them proved satis- 
factory. A few had little or no farming 
experience but they seemed anxious to 
learn and to repay their passage money 
as soon as possible. They did not arrive 
as soon as required, however, and the 
delay caused some inconvenience and 
resulted in a number of cancellations by 
farmers who had requested help. Of the 
36 workers in the group, 25 have remained 
with their original employers and six have 
been placed with other employers; the 
others left the province. 

Immigration of farm workers from The 
Netherlands was greater than in the 
previous year. About 89 families, compris- 
ing 371 persons, and 80 single workers were 
placed on Nova Scotia farms during the 
year. Loans were granted to a number 
of immigrants to enable them to purchase 
their own farms. 

Demands for apple pickers were light 
because of the small crop and most of 
the labour was obtained locally. 

Three interprovincial movements of farm 
labour took place. These consisted of 240 



potato pickers and 25 haymakers to Prince 
Edward Island and 146 haymakers to 
Ontario. 

New Brunswick — Competition for farm 
labour in the province was lessened through 
the reduction of woods operations. This 
condition was partly offset, however, by a 
demand for labour in construction work. 
Spring seeding was delayed by wet weather, 
which development resulted in a demand 
for late labour. There was a shortage of 
labour for haymaking and a lot of hay 
was left uncut because the cost of 
harvesting was out of line with prices. No 
difficulty was experienced in harvesting the 
grain and potato crops. Approximately 900 
students were employed on a daily basis 
for bean picking. 

Immigrant workers placed on farms 
totalled 125 married men with families and 
92 single men. 

In response to a request from the state 
of Maine, a substantial number of workers 
was sent across the border to assist in 
harvesting the potato crop. 

Quebec— The farm labour situation was 
less acute in 1952 because of a more normal 
distribution of manpower and greater 
mechanization, it was reported. 

Principal farm labour movements con- 
sisted of Italian immigrants, sugar blockers, 
between 40 and 50 tobacco curers from the 
state of Maine, sugar beet harvesters, 
harvesters to the Prairie region, and potato 
pickers to the state of Maine. 

During the year 345 Italian immigrants 
were placed on farms in Quebec. Farmers, 
on the whole, were satisfied with their 
services; some complained of "instability". 
Sugar beet growers were supplied with 
703 workers for thinning and rooting-out 
operations and 227 pullers. Because of the 
increasing use of mechanical pullers, fewer 
workers were required for this operation. 

This year 66 boys and girls were sent 
to Ontario to assist with the fruit and 
vegetable crops ; their services were reported 
to be satisfactory. These young workers, 
it seems, are glad to have the opportunity 
of increasing their knowledge of English 
and at the same time widening their 
experience. 

Recruitment of workers for the Prairies 
is becoming increasingly difficult, it was 
stated, because of the need for a knowl- 
edge of mechanics. This year 604 were 
sent. 

A new movement of workers took place 
during the year with the movement of 125 
potato pickers to the state of New York. 
Satisfaction with the selection and co- 
operation was expressed by the United 



44 



States authorities. A large movement of 
potato pickers to the state of Maine was 
again successfully carried out. 

Ontario — Farmers in the province had 
experienced a longer-than-usual season for 
field work, it was reported. Spring seeding 
went forward without a serious shortage 
of labour because of the favourable weather 
and a lull in industrial and building 
activity. Mechanization and good weather 
contributed to an early harvest. 

The demand for transient tobacco 
harvesters was reduced because of a sharp 
decline in acreage, good weather and more 
local help. A hostel in Simcoe, Ont., 
relieved congestion among the thousands 
of workers who moved into the tobacco 
growing area. Curers brought in from the 
United States numbered 1,517, an increase 
of 54 over 1951. 

A total of 20 farm labour camps 
supplied 706 boys and girls to 144 fruit 
growers in the province. In 1951, 24 camps 
supplied 1,133 young workers to 217 
growers. Because of high cost of operation 
and the increasing availability of local 
labour, the Federal-Provincial Farm Labour 
Committee has recommended that the camp 
program be discontinued. 

It was reported that, since 1949, about 
1,300 Dutch immigrants have purchased 
farms in Ontario and many more are look- 
ing for properties. These families have 
increased the farm labour force. However, 
rapid industrial expansion is having a very 
direct effect on the labour problem. The 
proportion of the total population living 
on farms is declining steadily and in 1951 
was only 14-7 per cent. Farmers, it was 
reported, are finding it difficult to compete 
with the construction industry, where wages 
are higher. 

Farmers are showing an active interest 
in Workmen's Compensation. Already some 
600 are covered and there has been a sharp 
increase in applications. 

Farm placements in Ontario in 1952 were 
fewer than in 1951. A total of 1,066 
German farm workers were brought into 
the province under the assisted passage 
plan. Another 331 single DP workers were 
enlisted at Ajax, Quebec and Sudbury. 
Some difficulty was experienced in keeping 
these immigrants in farm work because of 
the large number with special skills who 
were anxious to find work in their own 
trades. It was reported that of the whole 
group, 159 left farm work. Immigrant 
couples were easier to place than immi- 
grant families as the latter often found 
existing accommodation inadequate. Alto- 
gether, there were 1,461 immigrant place- 
ments as compared with 2,091 in 1951. 



Sugar beet thinning operations required 
fewer workers than usual because of the 
dry weather and 140 Italian workers 
borrowed from Quebec were found to be 
sufficient to satisfy the demand. 

In the movement of workers to Ontario 
for harvesting, it was reported that Mani- 
toba and Alberta supplied 174, the Mari- 
times and Newfoundland 349. There were 
1,730 Ontario workers sent to the Prairies 
for harvesting by the National Employ- 
ment Service, compared with 1,551 in 1951. 

Manitoba — Unusually favourable weather 
in Manitoba rendered seeding conditions 
ideal, made possible the recovery of nearly 
all grain which had been left out during 
the winter and contributed to an all-time 
record crop. 

The general labour situation was normal 
during the early spring. The number of 
placements was below that of 1951. How- 
ever, the crop was harvested quickly and 
efficiently due to greater mechanization and 
the ideal weather conditions. 

The 269 workers recruited from Eastern 
Canada for the wheat harvest were of high 
ability and behaviour, the farmers reported. 

Manitoba sent only between 40 and 50 
workers to Ontario as the appeal did not 
meet with much response. 

Some 35 Dutch and German immigrants 
were placed on farms. These were very 
satisfactory and it was hoped they would 
continue in agricultural employment. 

Wages showed a tendency to rise and 
experienced men were offered as high a3 
$120 per month and board, it was reported. 

Because harvest activities in Manitoba 
coincided with those of North Dakota, 
there was no movement of combines across 
the border. 

Saskatchewan— In 1952 the 112,000 
farmers in the province harvested the 
record total of 700 million bushels of 
grain, the largest crop in 60 years. 
Another 111 million bushels left over from 
the 1951 crop raised the year's total to 
811 million bushels. 

Mechanization reduced the seasonal 
demand for farm labour. At no time 
during the harvesting period was there an 
acute shortage of harvest labour in any of 
the nine National Employment Service 
zones. 

Some 300 German workers were brought 
into Saskatchewan and placed on farms. 
A total of 100 beet workers from the Indian 
population went to Montana for the sugar 
beet crop there. Only 43 Saskatchewan 
workers were recruited for the British 
Columbia berry harvest. 

Altogether, there were 4,481 placements 
through NES offices. Of these, 1,188 were 



45 



from Ontario and Quebec. 1,074 from 
Winnipeg;, and 3,293 were local workers. 
Another 545 workers entered the province 
from the United States with custom 
combine crews, making a total of 5,026 
placements. 

It was estimated that some 4,000 farm 
workers entered the province on their own 
and found employment without reporting 
to NES offices. 

Alberta — Supply and demand for farm 
workers were well balanced throughout the 
peak seasons of seeding and harvesting. 
Although labour demand was fairly brisk 
in the spring, local workers filled most 
vacancies. 

At harvest time, the sharp demand was 
again met by local supply, supplemented 
by the east-west movement. Eastern 
workers became available as Manitoba and 
Saskatchewan finished their harvesting. 

During the year, there was a large move- 
ment of immigrants to Alberta for sugar 
beet work. This group played a large 
part in cultivating and harvesting the 
largest beet crop in the history of the 
province. 

A trend was reported towards a lower 
demand for farm workers over the years 
because of increased mechanization of 
farm work. Some difficulty was experi- 
enced in keeping immigrants on the farms. 

British Columbia — A mild winter and an 
early spring contributed to better than 
average crops. Labour requirements in 
fruit, potatoes, hops and grain were met 
without difficulty until the end of May. 

In anticipation of a strong demand for 
help with the berry crop, orders were 
placed for the movement of 500 women 
from the Prairies. However, the 92-day 
logging and sawmill strike which began in 
June released some 2,500 workers, suffi- 
cient to meet all demands. The prairie 
orders were cancelled after only 92 women 
had arrived. 

Hutterites from South Alberta recruited 
to help with the soft fruit, hop, apple and 
potato crops were highly regarded by the 
growers. 

There is a growing awareness, it was 
stated, that emergencj' situations in British 
Columbia must be met by local volunteers, 
especially where perishable crops are to be 
harvested. Boards of Trade and school 
boards were co-operating admirably in 
supplying local workers. 

Industrial employment has seriously 
depleted the supply of competent per- 
manent workers for agriculture but the 
situation in c drying and mixed farming 
is less critical than it was. Good ranch 



hands were scarce. Sheepherding had been 
gravely reduced as a result of lack of 
herders. As in other provinces, immigrants 
had not shown a desire to remain at farm 
work. 

Farm placements were slightly higher 
than in 1951, and no complaints of lost 
crops due to lack of help were received. 

Canadian Federation of Agriculture 

Speaking for the Canadian Federation 
of Agriculture was R. A. Stewart, a director 
of the Federation. The Federal- 
Provincial Farm Labour conference, he 
said, helps facilitate the movement of farm 
labour from one part of Canada to another. 

In 1953, he anticipated that the pattern 
would be much the same "but, of course, 
it will be largely influenced by weather and 
crop conditions". Farmers, he thought, 
will be more particular as to the type of 
help they get. At the present time, he 
said, there is a great deal of confusion 
in the minds of the farmers in regard to 
planning for the coming year. Under 
present conditions of surplus supplies and 
restricted markets, many farmers will 
curtail production and carry out opera- 
tions with the minimum of hired help. 
Farmers must cut down expenses and there 
will be an effort on the part of more and 
more farmers to work together during peak 
periods. 

Mr. Stewart spoke of the desirability of 
extending social benefits to agricultural 
workers. Coverage under the Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Act and the Workmen's 
Compensation Acts, he said, would have 
the effect of holding workers on the farm. 

Manpower Situation 

W. Dymond, Economics and Research 
Branch, Department of Labour, presented 
an analysis of the current manpower situa- 
tion and indicated some of the economic 
variables affecting the outlook for 1953. 

High levels of industrial employment can 
be expected in 1953, he stated. 

The general level of employment began 
to rise in mid-summer, Mr. Dymond stated, 
first because of seasonal activity in agri- 
culture and construction and also because 
of renewed activity in the consumer goods 
and associated industries. The employ- 
ment picture is better than last year and 
this is expected to be carried over into 
at least the greater part of 1953. 

Unlike last year, this winter season is 
beginning with employment trends generally 
showing more strength. Seasonal unem- 
ployment will probably not reach as high 
levels during the winter of 1952-53 as it 
did a year ago, he predicted. 



46 



The one soft spot in the manpower 
outlook, he said, is in the logging industry 
where, because of a reduction in demand 
for pulps and the existence of substantial 
inventories, a reduction of employment is 
expected this winter. 

A major factor contributing to high 
employment levels in the coming year is 
the increase in consumer expenditures, 
which lagged until July and August. In 
September, retail sales were more than six 
per cent above the comparable 1951 figure 
and during October, department store sales 
were 20 per cent higher than a year ago. 
As inventories are at a lower level than 
last year, increased expenditures will likely 
be followed more closely by increased 
production and employment, he said. 

The probable level of construction 
employment next year, he continued, will 
depend upon future investment activities. 
A considerable volume of construction work 
is already assured as many large projects 
begun in 1952 will not be completed until 
late in 1953, or sometime in 1954. In addi- 
tion, there are indications of increased 
investment activity in the service and 
distributive sectors of the economy. Also, 
the recently-announced intention of the 
federal Government to apply deferred 
depreciation regulations only on property 
acquired up to December 1952, will prob- 
ably stimulate some increased investment 
activity next year in the fields concerned. 
. Defence expenditures will again be at 
high levels in 1953, with the emphasis 
swinging from non-durable items, and will 
act as a supporting influence on the 
economy. 

With the expectation that there will be 
numerous job opportunities next year, Mr. 
'Dymond concluded, the movement of 
workers from rural to urban areas is likely 
to continue. 

W. K. Rutherford, Director of Employ- 
ment Service, Unemployment Insurance 
Commission, said he concurred with Mr. 
Dymond's observations. He thought that 
the outlook for the next six months is 
much the same as in 1952, with the possi- 
bility of it being better from an employ- 
ment point of view. The outlook is for a 
continuing high level of employment. 

While logging operations will definitely 
decline, there are many favourable aspects 
to the situation, he said. Residential 
housing construction, for instance, will 
undoubtedly improve in the coming year. 
There will be the usual demands by various 
groups for panaceas. The farm implement 
workers are exercised over their situation; 
they want continuing employment in the 



industry. The backlog of farm machinery 
has been largely met and the industry is 
in a somewhat similar situation to that of 
the automobile industry, where the backlog- 
has also been met. 

The overall picture as compared with 
that of a year ago is that we have fewer 
unplaced applicants, he concluded. 

Intra- and Interprovincial Movements 

William MacGillivray, Director, Agricul- 
tural Development and Extension Service, 
reported that British Columbia, after much 
thought, has decided to discontinue farm 
labour camps. Conditions in the fruit and 
vegetable producing areas, he said, have 
changed to the point where the demand 
is not sufficient to warrant their estab- 
lishment. There is no doubt that the 
camps have served a useful purpose and 
the growers have appreciated the assistance 
they have been to them. 

International Movements 

Dave Fessenden, Bureau of Employment 
Security, Washington, who brought greet- 
ings from the United States, said the 
Canadian situation closely paralleled that 
of the United States. Through co-opera- 
tion under the Farm Labour Program, New 
England growers had a successful season. 
He expressed gratification that Canada was 
able to recruit so promptly on such short 
notice. The season was favourable but 
perhaps not as much so as in Canada ; there 
was no concern over surpluses. Agricul- 
tural placement figures were up in spite 
of bad weather conditions. 

It is impossible to forecast what the 
demands for non-seasonable workers will 
be until the impact of the proposed amend- 
ments to the Immigration Act is known, 
he said. 

Farm Labour Requirements 

It was estimated that approximately 3,500 
immigrant farm workers would be required 
in 1953. The delegates could give only 
tentative estimates of their requirements 
but generally they will require about the 
same number as had been received in 1952. 

On the subject of regional changes in 
farming methods and their relation to 
labour requirements, M. C. Crosbie of the 
National Employment Service reported 
that between the census years 1941 and 
1951 the number of farms in Canada had 
decreased by about 58.000 and the total 
farm population by 250,000. However, 
there was an increase in improved land 
of some five million acres and the increase 



47 



ill field crops was about six million bushels. 
It was concluded that there was an increase 
in the land worked with the men avail- 
able. This increase was due, among other 
things, to the greater use of farm machinery. 
Sales of farm tractors doubled in 1947. 
with steady increases in 1948 and 1949, and 
another large increase in sales of heavy 
tractors in 1951. 

In Mr. Crosbie's opinion, Canadian agri- 
culture was not yet near the saturation 
point in mechanization. At the same time, 
some delegates expressed a doubt whether 
farm machinery actually did result in the 
hiring of less labour on small farms. 

It was noted that Workmen's Compensa- 
tion was helping to improve employment 
conditions on farms. 

Dr. W. F. Darke, Agricultural Adviser to 
the United Kingdom High Commissioner, 
reported that the labour situation in Great 
Britain is still acute in view of the renewed 
food production effort. He estimated the 
total number of agricultural workers in the 
United Kingdom at 663,300. 

Immigration 

J. A. Paul of the Department of Citizen- 
ship and Immigration told the delegates 
that Germany and other North European 
countries where farming conditions are 
similar to those in Canada will be looked 
upon as the main source of farm immi- 
grants in 1953. 

However, he said, in some of these 
countries Canadian immigration offices must 
wait for nationals to apply. The DP phase 
of immigration is over and it is now a 
matter of persons of one country being 
fitted into the society of another. 

The delegates agreed that immigrant 
labour placed on farms in 1952 was gener- 
ally satisfactory. They emphasized the 
importance of proper selection and of 
having immigrant workers arrive in time 
for farm operations. 

It was felt that quoting only the wage 
rate to prospective immigrants did not 
present a true picture and that a cash 
value should be placed on board. They 
might be shown the difference between 
working and living in the city and working 
on the farm, where living is provided. 

The delegates felt there should be more 
co-operation among the different public and 
private agencies at the provincial level so 
that duplication of orders for immigrant 
help by farmers might be avoided. 

Federal-Provincial Agreements 

The general feeling was that most of the 
provinces were in favour of continuing the 
program next year and of entering into 
agreements for 1953. 



Those Present 

Provincial officials who attended the 
Conference were S. D. Peacock, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Prince Edward Island ; 
S. E. Lewis, Director of Farm Labour, 
Department of Agriculture and Marketing, 
Nova Scotia; E. M. Taylor, Chairman, 
Federal-Provincial Farm Labour Com- 
mittee, New Brunswick; A. J. Rioux, 
Director, Farm Labour Supply Bureau, 
Department of Agriculture, Quebec; J. A. 
Carroll, Assistant Deputy Minister of 
Agriculture, Ontario; A. J. McTaggart, 
Director, Ontario Farm Service Force, 
Department of Agriculture, Ontario; H. R. 
Richardson, Director, Farm Help Service, 
Department of Agriculture and Immigra- 
tion, Manitoba; L. J. Hutchison, Director 
of Agricultural Representatives, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Saskatchewan; F. H. 
Newcombe, Director of Agricultural Exten- 
sion Service, Department of Agriculture, 
Alberta; and W. MacGillivray, Director, 
Agricultural Development and Extension 
Service, Department of Agriculture, British 
Columbia. 

National Employment Service officials 
included W. K. Rutherford, Director of 
Employment Service, Ottawa; W. Duncan, 
Chief, Employment Specialists, Ottawa; 
M. C. Crosbie, Employment Adviser, 
Primary Industries, Ottawa; D. W. Hay, 
Employment Adviser, Atlantic Region, 
Moncton, N.B.; A. Ouimet, Employment 
Adviser, Quebec Region, Montreal; W. 
Davison, Employment Adviser, Ontario 
Region, Toronto; H. D. Hurdon, Employ- 
ment Adviser, Prairie Region, Winnipeg, 
Man.; F. C. Hitchcock, Employment 
Adviser, Regina, Sask.; and W. L. 
Forrester, Supervisor of General Place- 
ments, Pacific Region, Vancouver, B.C. 

Departments of the federal Government 
were represented by J. F. Booth, F. R. 
Armstrong and J. Dawson of the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture; J. A. Paul and R. M. 
Winter of the Department of Citizenship 
and Immigration; and J. L. Forsyth, R. S. 
Ellis and P. Stuchan of the Department 
of Trade and Commerce. 

Others in attendance were: R. A. 
Stewart, Canadian Federation of Agricul- 
ture; W. F. Darke, Agricultural Adviser 
to the United Kingdom High Commis- 
sioner; A. S. Tuinman, Agricultural Attache, 
Royal Netherlands Embassy; F. B. Kirk- 
wood, Canadian National Railways; D. W. 
Fessenden, Bureau of Employment Security, 
Washington, D.C., and A. F. Gillespie, 
Bureau of Employment Security, Boston, 
Mass. 



48 



Fatal Industrial Accidents in Canada* 
During the Third Quarter of 1952 

Industrial fatalities during the third quarter of 1952 numbered 363, 
a decrease of three from 366 recorded during the previous quarter 



There were 363f industrial fatalities in 
Canada in the third quarter of 1952, 
according to the latest reports received by 
the Department of Labour. This marks 
a decrease of three fatalities from the 
previous quarter, in which 366 were 
recorded, including 25 in a supplementary 
list. 

As in previous quarterly articles, Table 
H-l contains information as to the number 
of industrial fatalities classified by main 
classes of industries and causes. The 
present table is compiled in accordance 
with the new clause classification adopted 
January 1, 1952. This new classification 
has been drawn up in consultation with the 
various provincial Workmen's Compensation 
Boards and will be used in the preparation 
of statistics to be derived from the federal- 
provincial accident statistics program which 
will deal with non-fatal as well as fatal 
accidents. As used in the present article, 
the new classification contains only the 
major groups of causes. 

During the quarter under review, six 
accidents resulted in the deaths of three 
or more persons in each case. On July 3, 
a fishing vessel, the Daisy B, disappeared 
off the coast of British Columbia with 
seven men aboard. At Glace Bay, N.S., 
seven miners were killed in a underground 
explosion July 9. Seven employees of the 
Manitoba Government lost their lives in 
a plane crash at Berens River, Man., on 
July 21. A railway accident at Seven 
Islands, P.Q., on September 12 resulted in 
the deaths of two construction workers and 
two employees of a mining company. The 
four men were in a railway caboose struck 
by a flat car rammed into it by a runaway 
diesel locomotive. On September 15, three 
tobacco workers were killed when the car 
in which they were travelling was in colli- 
sion with a truck near Langton, Ont. At 



*See Tables H-l and H-2 at end of book. 

fThe number of industrial fatalities which 
occurred during the third quarter of 1952 
is probably greater than the figure now 
quoted. Information on accidents which 
occur but are not reported in time for 
inclusion in the quarterly articles is recorded 
in supplementary lists and statistics are 
amended accordingly. 



67040—4 



The industrial fatalities recorded in 
these quarterly articles, prepared by the 
Economics and Research Branch, are 
those fatal accidents which involved 
persons gainfully employed and which 
occurred during the course of, or which 
arose out of, their employment. These 
include deaths which resulted from indus- 
trial disease's as reported by provincial 
Workmen's Compensation IBoards. 

Statistics on industrial fatalities are 
compiled from reports received from the 
various Workmen's Compensation Boards, 
the Board of Transport Commissioners 
and certain other official sources. News- 
paper reports are used to supplement 
these data. For those industries not 
covered by workmen's compensation legis- 
lation, newspaper reports are the Depart- 
ment's only source of information. It is 
possible, therefore, that coverage in such 
industries as agriculture, fishing and 
trapping and certain of the service 
groups is not as complete as in those 
industries which are covered by compen- 
sation legislation. Similarly, a small 
number of traffic accidents which are in 
fact industrial accidents may be omitted 
from the Department's records because of 
lack of information given in press reports. 



the time of the accident the three men 
were being driven back to the farm where 
they were regularly employed after spend- 
ing the day working at a neighbouring 
farm. On September 25, at Port Arthur, 
Ont., four men lost their lives as the result 
of a dust explosion at the grain elevator 
where they were working. 

Grouped by industries, the largest 
number of fatalities, 75, was recorded in 
the construction industry. Of these 43 
were in miscellaneous construction, 20 in 
buildings and structures and 12 in highway 
and bridge construction. In the previous 
three months there were 55 fatalities listed 
in this industry, including 24 in miscel- 
laneous construction and 18 in buildings 
and structures. 

There were 54 industrial deaths in manu- 
facturing during the third quarter of 1952, 
of which 14 occurred in the wood products 
group and eight in the paper products 
industry. During the preceding three 
months there were 68 fatalities recorded in 
manufacturing, including 16 in each of the 
(Continued on page 117) 



49 



International 
Labour Organization 



Meeting of Experts Proposes 

Measures to Raise Productivity 

Sixteen experts of 13 different nationalities, after intensive 10-day 
study make specific proposals for increasing productivity within the 
factory. George V. Haythorne of Department of Labour was chairman 



Sixteen experts of 13 different nationali- 
ties have conclude^ an intensive ten-day 
study of methods ol increasing productivity 
in the world's manufacturing industries. 
The chairman was George V. Haythorne, 
Director, Economics and Research Branch, 
Department of Labour. 

The meeting was convened by the 
Governing Body of the International 
Labour Organization as part of the ILO's 
continuing program of activities aimed at 
raising living standards by increasing the 
production of goods and services. 

The experts' conclusions were embodied 
in a report which will be considered by 
the Governing Body at its next session in 
February. They recommended that the 
report should be widely publicized but 
agreed that it should remain confidential 
until the Governing Body had examined it. 

The agenda of the meeting called upon 
the experts (1) to consider practical 
methods of increasing productivity in 
manufacturing, with particular reference to 
the human factors and to the organiza- 
tional and technical factors involved, and 
(2) to advise the ILO on its future program 
relating to productivity. 

The meeting arrived at a number of 
general conclusions, and also reached 
agreement on a series of specific proposals 
aimed at increasing productivity within the 
factory. 

The session was attended by representa- 
tives of the Government, employer and 
worker members of the Governing Body, 
and by representatives of various inter- 
governmental and international non-govern- 
mental organizations. The experts attend- 
ing were drawn from employer, worker and 
independent circles. 

Summing up their views on the general 
aspects of the problem of raising produc- 
tivity, the experts agreed that it was of 
the utmost importance, if higher produc- 
tivity was in fact to lead to higher living 



standards, that its benefits should be 
equitably distributed among capital, labour 
and consumers. It was equally important 
that the demand for goods and services 
should be maintained at a sufficiently high 
level and that adequate measures should be 
taken to prevent higher productivity from 
leading to unemployment. Failure to 
distribute widely the benefits of increased 
productivity and to maintain demand and 
employment would mean that the condi- 
tions for continuing increases in produc- 
tivity would not exist. 

The achievement of higher productivity, 
it was agreed, called for action on the part 
of governments, employers and workers. 
Governments had responsibility for creating 
conditions favourable to higher produc- 
tivity by promoting a balanced program 
of economic development and by adopting 
appropriate economic and social policies in 
such matters as foreign trade, capital 
formation, monopolistic practices, and the 
supply of raw materials. 

Higher productivity called for concerted 
efforts on the part of members of all groups 
engaged directly or indirectly in produc- 
tion. Such efforts might require in some 
cases far-reaching changes in the attitudes 
of all concerned. 

Full co-operation on the part of all 
groups could be expected only in a society 
which accepted principles of social justice 
and in which it was recognized that the 
fundamental purpose of industry was to 
serve the needs of society as a whole. 

Among their other conclusions, the 
experts expressed the view that the share 
of workers in the benefits of higher pro- 
ductivity might take the form in part of 
higher wages, in part of lower prices for 
the goods produced, and in part of better 
working conditions, including shorter hours, 
social services, and improved housing. 



50 



Improvements in equipment and tech- 
niques might make it necessary for some 
workers to change their jobs. Measures to 
increase productivity should therefore be 
accompanied by measures to protect the 
interests of any workers who might lose 
their jobs or be threatened with the loss 
of jobs. 

There was an urgent need for further 
experiment, investigation and research into 
the influence of the various factors affect- 
ing productivity. 

The experts reached a number of 
general and specific conclusions on the 
question of raising productivity at the 
plant level. 

They agreed that primary responsibility 
for action in the individual undertaking 
rested with management. They were also 
in agreement, however, that no effort to 



increase productivity could succeed with- 
out good relations between management 
and the workers concerned. 

Increased productivity in the undertaking 
called for action in three main fields: the 
organization and control of production, 
personnel policy, and plant and equipment. 
In each of these fields, the experts made 
a number of detailed practical recom- 
mendations. 

The experts suggested that the ILO's 
work in the field of productivity should 
have three main objectives: (1) to promote 
wider understanding of the subject; 
(2) to ensure that increased productivity 
led rapidly to improvements in economic 
and social welfare and (3) to provide 
technical assistance and advice on the 
raising of productivity. 



ILO Names Two Canadians to High Positions 




Douglas M. Young 

Douglas M. Young, Personnel Director 
of Lever Bros., Canada, has been named 
Head of the personnel office of the Inter- 
national Labour Office, it was announced 
by David A. Morse, ILO Director-General. 

Another ILO appointment of interest to 
Canada is that of William Yalden-Thomson 



of Toronto to the position of Assistant 
Director-General. Mr. Yalden-Thomson 
has been Chief of Operations in charge of 
co-ordinating all ILO projects and activi- 
ties under the Expanded Technical Assist- 
ance Program. In his new post he will 
continue to direct the ILO's operational 
activities, now being greatly expanded. 

His first appointment to the ILO was in 
1951 as Chief of the Employer Relations 
Division (L.G., Oct., 1951, p. 1332). 

Mr. Young, a resident of York Mills, Ont., 
is chairman of the Canadian Manufacturers' 
Association's Committee on Old Age Pen- 
sions and a member of the Association's 
Industrial Relations Committee. He was 
President of the Personnel Association of 
Toronto in 1949-50 and a member of its 
Advisory Council. 

In his new post, Mr. Young will not only 
be personnel chief for some 700 ILO officials 
throughout the world but will also assist 
in personnel matters affecting several 
hundred experts sent to less-developed 
countries on ILO projects. 

Toronto-born and a graduate of Queen's 
Universitj', Kingston, Ont., Mr. Young has 
served on the Ontario Regional Employ- 
ment Committee of the National Employ- 
ment Service and as chairman of the 
professional section of the Toronto Welfare 
Council's Committee on Job Evaluation. 

He was Canadian employer delegate to 
the ILO's Conference of American States 
in Brazil in April last year. 



67040— 4£ 



51 




TEAMWORK 
in INDUSTRY 



Year-old LMPC Progresses Rapidly 

The record of the labour-management 
production committee at the Maple Leaf 
Milling Co., in Toronto, is one of steady 
achievement. This LMPC, which was 
founded a little more than one year ago, 
has progressed rapidly since that time. The 
original impetus for the committee came 
from one of the employees who suggested 
that there was a need for some method 
whereby management and labour could 
discuss their common problems. 

The committee's main objective has been 
expressed by I. J. Young, Plant Manager, 
in an article appearing in "The Flour Bag", 
LMPC-sponsored paper, as follows: — 

"Our main objective is to improve 
efficiency through greater co-operation 
between the two groups. It is a joint 
enterprise. It is a two-way communication 
channel for the exchange of ideas and 
information. It should be an instrument 
to make possible: plant action on produc- 
tion, conservation, recreation, welfare, 
morale, absenteeism, safety and any 
number of important problems. It is an 
advisory board only. It studies problems, 
then makes recommendations. It is not a 
device to be used by either management 
or labour for their own ends. It is a joint 
venture for the promotion of their common 
enterprises." 

Discussing the LMPC, Mill Superin- 
tendent Lloyd Rupert said that it has 
built up a feeling of team spirit and that 
its success is basically tied to the attitude 
of the people working in the plant. 

Among the activities which the com- 
mittee has engaged in are production, 
safety, suggestions, publicity, welfare, 
recreation, good housekeeping and an 
employees sick benefit fund. 

The safety sub-committee has been 
particularly active and, through its efforts, 
a safety record of 122 days had been 
established up to mid-November.. Two 
departments in the plant had gone for 350 
days without a lost-time accident. The 
management estimates that, because of this 
group's work, accidents of all types have 
been cut by about 50 per cent. 



In summing up the first year's activities 
of the Maple Leaf Milling LMPC, Mr. 
Young said: — 

"I think we have done not too badly 
and, after having gone through this trial 
year, fully believe we have ended up with 
some worthwhile results. We, no doubt, 
have made some mistakes — yes — but we 
profit by them, and as time goes on and 
we continue its existence I think more 
beneficial results will follow." 

Local 174 of the American Federation of 
Grain Millers (AFL) is the bargaining 
agent participating in this LMPC. 
* * * 

A story of achievement and improved 
labour relations was recently told in the 
Cobourg Sentinel-Star. The story was 
about the LMPC at the Dominion Wheel 
and Foundries Ltd, Cobourg plant, where 
an LMPC has been operating for the past 
two years. 

In writing on the LMPC, the Sentinel- 
Star said: "The committee, which is 
composed of five labour representatives and 
two representatives of -management, has 
proved its capabilities by developing 
excellent relations within the local firm and 
reducing or eliminating conditions which, 
prove disadvantageous to both labour and 
management. 

"Many changes which originated at meet- 
ings of the Labour-Management Produc- 
tion Committee have been made in the 
plant. Production materials and altera- 
tions were recommended, and both the 
quantity and quality of production have 
been considerably improved. Such 
measures have also tended to reduce 
absenteeism to a minimum. 

"The successful slogan of the successful 
committee is 'A shop with harmony, better 
working conditions, better products and 
better production leads to better security 
for the employees.' " 

Labour representatives on this LMPC 
are members of Local 189, International 
Moulders and Foundrv Workers' Union of 
North America (AFL-TLC). 



Establishment of Labour-Management 
Production Committees (LMPCs) is 
encouraged and assisted by the Labour- 
Management Co-operation Service. In- 
dustrial Relations Branch, Department 
of Labour. In addition to field repre- 
sentatives located in key industrial 
centres, who are available to help both 
managements and trade unions set up 
LMPCs, the Service provides publicity 
aids in the form of booklets, films and 
posters. 



52 



Industrial Relations 
and Conciliation 



Certification and Other Proceedings before 

the Canada Labour Relations Board 



The Canada Labour Relations Board 
met for two days during November. The 
Board issued five certificates designating 
bargaining agents, ordered two representa- 
tion votes and rejected two applications 
for certification. During the month the 
Board received one application for 
certification. 

Applications for Certification Granted 

West Coast Seamen's Union (Canada) 
on behalf of a unit of unlicensed personnel 
of the deck, engineroom and steward's 
departments employed by Kingscome 
Navigation Company Limited, Vancouver, 
B.C. (L.G., Dec, 1952, p. 1583). 

West Coast Seamen's Union (Canada), 
applicant, on behalf of a unit of deck, 
engineroom and steward's departments 
employed by Straits Towing Limited, 
Vancouver, B.C. (L.G., Dec, 1952, p. 1583). 

West Coast Seamen's Union (Canada) 
on behalf of a unit of deck, engineroom 
and steward's departments employed by 
Vancouver Tug Boat Co. Ltd., Vancouver, 
B.C. (L.G., Dec, 1952, p. 1583). 

West Coast Seamen's Union (Canada) 
on behalf of a unit of deck, engineroom 
and steward's departments employed by 
Monarch Towing and Trading Co. Ltd., 
New Westminster, B.C. (L.G., Dec, 1952, 
p. 1583). 

Canadian Merchant Service Guild Inc. 
on behalf of a unit of deck officers on 
SS Cedarton and SS. Birchton operated by 
Gulf and Lake Navigation Co. Ltd., 
Montreal, P.Q. (L.G., Nov., 1952, p. 1467). 

Representation Votes Ordered 

The Board ordered representation votes 
of employees in the following applications 
for certification: — 

1. Grand International Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers, applicant, and 
S h a w i n i g a n Falls Terminal Railway, 
respondent (locomotive engineers) (L.G., 
Nov., 1952, p. 1465). 



This section covers proceedings under 
the Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act, involving the admin- 
istrative Services of the Minister of 
Labour, the Canada Labour Relations 
and the Industrial Relations Branch of 
the Department. 



2. Grand International Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers, applicant, and 
S h a w i n i g a n Falls Terminal Railway, 
respondent (helpers on locomotives) (L.G., 
Nov., 1952, p. 1465). 

Application for Certification Received 

Maintenance Workers Federal Union 
No. 493 on behalf of a unit of mainten- 
ance employees of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway Company (B.C. Coast Steam- 
ship Service) (Investigating Officer: D. S. 
Tysoe). 

Applications for Certification Rejected 

1. Seafarer's International Union of North 
America, Canadian District, on behalf of 
a unit of unlicensed personnel employed 
by Howe Sound Lines Limited, Vancouver, 
B.C. (L.G., Nov, 1952, p. 1466). The 
application was rejected in view of the 
decision of the British Columbia Courts 
in the case of General Theatre Supply and 
Labour Relations Board (British Columbia) 
quashing an order of certification of the 
British Columbia Labour Relations Board 
issued in respect of a unit consisting of 
one employee only. 

2. Order of Railway Conductors of 
America on behalf of a unit of road train 
conductors employed by the Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company on its Prairie 
and Pacific Regions (L.G., Oct, 1952, 
p. 1351). The application was rejected for 
the reason that the applicant did not have 
the support of a majority of the employees 
affected. 



53 



Conciliation and other Proceedings 

before the Minister of Labour 



Conciliation Officers Appointed 

During November the Minister appointed 
Conciliation Officers to deal with the 
following disputes:— 

1. Midland Railway Company of Mani- 
toba and Order of Railway Conductors of 
America (Conciliation Officer: R. H. 
Hooper). 

2. Union Steamships Limited, Vancouver, 
and Canadian Communications Association 
(Conciliation Officer: G. R. Currie). 

3. British Columbia Steamship Co. Ltd., 
Vancouver, and Seafarer's International 
Union of North America, Canadian Dis- 
trict (Conciliation Officer: G. R. Currie). 

4. Shipping Federation of British Columbia 
and Northland Navigation Co. Ltd., Van- 
couver, and Local 38/163, International 
Longshoremen's Association (Conciliation 
Officer: G. R. Currie). 

Settlement Reported by Conciliation Officer 

During the month the Minister received 
a report from G. R. Currie, Conciliation 
Officer, advising of the settlement of the 
dispute between Canadian Pacific Railway 
Company (British Columbia Coast Steam- 
ship Service) and Machinists, Fitters and 
Helpers Local No. 3 (L.G., Dec, 1952, 
p. 1584). 

Conciliation Board Appointed 

During November the Minister estab- 
lished a Board of Conciliation and Investi- 
gation to deal with matters in dispute 
between the Searle Grain Co. Ltd., Pacific 
Elevators Ltd., United Grain Growers Ltd, 
Kerr Gifford & Co. Inc., Alberta Wheat 
Pool, all of Vancouver, and the Interna- 
tional Union of United Brewery, Flour, 
Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers 
of America. The Board had not been 
fully constituted at the end of the month. 



Conciliation Board Fully Constituted 

The Board of Conciliation and Investi- 
gation established in September to deal 
with matters in dispute between the Cana- 
dian Overseas Telecommunications Corpora- 
tion, Montreal (operators) and Overssas 
Communication Union Local 272 (L.G, 
Dec, 1952, p. 0000) was fully constituted 
in November with the appointment of 
Prof. H. D. Woods, Montreal, as Chairman. 
Prof. Woods was appointed by the Min- 
ister on the joint recommendation of 
Theodore R. Meighen, QC, of Montreal, 
and A. Andras of Ottawa, who had been 
previously appointed on the nominations, 
respectively, of the company and union. 

Conciliation Board Reports Received 

During November the Minister received 
the following reports oi Boards of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation: — 

1. Canadian National Railways, Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway Company, Toronto, 
Hamilton and Buffalo Railway Company 
and Ontario Northland Railway and 
various railway labour organizations acting 
through a joint negotiating committee 
r e p r e s e n t i n g, mainly, non-operating 
employees of the companies (L.G., Oct., 
1952, p. 1352). Texts of the Board's report 
and the minority report are reproduced 
below. 

2. McCabe Grain Company Limited 
(Shamrock E'evator and Feed Mills, St. 
Boniface) and Local 105 International 
Union of United Brewery, Flour, Cereal, 
Soft Drink and Distillery Workers of 
America (L.G.. June, 1952, p. 756). Text 
of the Board's report is reproduced below. 

3. Keystone Transports Limited and 
Canadian Merchant Service Guild Inc. 
(L.G, Nov, 1952, p. 1467). Text of the 
Board's report is reproduced below. 



The first five-day, 40-hour week in a British Columbia hospital went into effect 
January 1. 

An agreement between the Vancouver General Hospital and Local 180. Hospital 
Employees Federal Union (TLC) provides for the reduction in working hours with no 
reduction in take-home pay. Nurses are included. 

The agreement also provides for a three-per-cent salary increase for male employees 
and a two-per-cent pay boost for female employees. 

Most British Columbia hospitals are on a 44-hour work week. 



54 



Report of Board in Dispute between 

Canadian National Railways, Canadian Pacific Railway 
Company, Ontario Northland Railway and Toronto, 
Hamilton and Buffalo Railway Company 

and 

Various National and International Railway Labour 
Organizations Representing Non-operating Employees 



The matters referred to this board are 
itemized in the notice dated July 3, 1952, 
served by the employee organizations con- 
cerned upon the railway companies, and 
are as follows: — 

1. Effective September 1, 1952, rates 
of pay shall be increased by forty-five 
(45^) cents per hour applied so as to 
give effect to this increase in pay irre- 
spective of the method of payment. 

2. Effective September 1, 1952, in 
addition to the basic wage rates, there 
shall be paid a cost-of-living bonus of 
one (1^) cent per hour, for each rise of 
one point in the Index Numbers of The 
Cost of Living in Canada from that 
date. 

3. All employees now or hereafter 
employed in any work covered by the 
rules and working conditions agreements 

- between the parties hereto shall, as a 
condition of continued employment in 
such work, within sixty days following 
the beginning of such employment or 
the effective date of this agreement, 
whichever is later, become members of, 
and thereafter maintain membership in 
good standing in, the organization party 
to this agreement. Provided, that such 
condition shall not apply with respect to 
any employee to whom such member- 
ship is not available upon the same 
terms and conditions as are generally 
applicable to any other member or with 
respect to any employee to whom 
membership was denied or terminated for 
any reason other than the failure of the 
employee to tender the periodic dues, 
initiation fees, and assessments (not 
including fines and penalties) uniformly 
required as a condition of acquiring or 
retaining membership. 

4. The Railway shall without cost to 
the organization periodically at such 
times and intervals as may be agreed 
upon, deduct from the wages of all 
employees now or hereafter employed in 
any work covered by the rules and work- 
ing conditions agreement between the 



On November 24, 1952, the Min- 
ister of Labour received the majority 
and minority reports of the Board of 
Conciliation^ and Investigation appointed 
to deal with a dispute affecting various 
national and international railway 
labour organizations representing non- 
operating employees of Canadian 
National Railways, Canadian Pacific 
Railway Company, Ontario Northland 
Railway, and the Toronto, Hamilton 
and Buffalo Railway Company (L.G., 
Oct, 1952, p. 1352). 

The Board was composed of the 
Hon. Mr. Justice R. L. Kellock, Chair- 
man, appointed by the Minister in the 
absence of a joint recommendation from 
the other two members, Paul S. Smith, 
QC of Montreal, and David Lewis of 
Toronto. 

The majority report, which under the 
provisions of the Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act consti- 
tutes the report of the Board, was 
signed by the Chairman and Mr. Smith. 
The minority report was submitted by 
Mr. Lewis. 

The texts of the majority and minority 
reports are reproduced herewith. 



parties hereto all periodic dues, initia- 
tion fees, and assessments (not including 
fines and penalties) uniformly required 
as a condition of acquiring or retaining 
membership in such organization, and 
shall pay the amount so deducted to 
such officer of the organization as the 
organization shall designate: provided. 
that the requirements of this section 
shall not be effective with respect to any 
individual employee until he shall have 
furnished the Railway with a written 
assignment to the organization of such 
membership dues, initiation fees and 
assessments, which shall be revocable in 
writing after the expiration of one year 
or upon the termination of this agree- 
ment whichever occurs sooner. 



55 



5. Eliminate the so-called "Emergency 
Clause" which appeared as supplement 
No. 2 on page 21 of the "Master Agree- 
ment" dated January 30, 1951. 

The names of the employee organizations 
represented before the Board are set out 
in Appendix 1 hereto, and the names of 
the railways similarly concerned are set out 
in Appendix 2. The number of employees 
directly affected in these proceedings is 
143,690 out of a total number of 161,533 
non-operating railway employees. The 
railways concerned operate 92 per cent of 
the total railway mileage in Canada. 

At the time of the service of the notice 
of July 3, 1952, upon the railways, there 
were current between the parties collective 
agreements due to expire on September 1 
following. Following the notice, negotia- 
tions took place between the parties from 
July 7 to 11, during which the railways 
offered an increase of 7 per cent in wage 
rates in settlement of all matters covered 
by the notice. This was refused by the 
employees. The parties being unable to 
make progress, a conciliator was appointed 
and further negotiations took place between 
July 22 and August 2, but agreement was 
not reached on any of the matters in 
dispute. This Board was thereupon 
appointed, its personnel being completed 
on August 28, 1952. 

At the request of the parties, and for 
their convenience, the Board did not 
commence hearings until September 22, 
sittings being continued through the 23, 
24 and 25 of that month when, upon 
joint request of the parties, the sittings 
were adjourned to October 3 and continued 
through October 6 and 7, being completed 
on October 8. Subsequently, the Board 
required and obtained on October 28 from 
the Economics and Research Branch of the 
Department of Labour further statistical 
material which was submitted to the 
parties for such comment or further- 
evidence any of them might see fit to 
submit, but no further representations were 
made to the Board. 

Dealing with the first item contained in 
the notice of July 3, 1952, the claim for 
"a flat wage increase of forty-five cents 
per hour," the matter is thus put in the 
employees' written statement: — 

Principal Factors on Which the Wage 
Demand is Based 
The Brotherhood are asking for wage 
and salary increases in the amount of 



45 cents per hour. The factors on which 
their demands are based are as follows: 

(1) The necessity for adjusting wages 
and salaries to the increase in the 
cost of living since March 1, 1948. 

(2) The desire of the employees to 
obtain compensation for the lowering 
of their standard of living or for the 
deficiency in wage payments in terms 
of purchasing power since 1939. 

(3) Social justice, and the enactment of 
the moral rights of the railway 
employees necessitates they be not 
excluded from the over-all improve- 
ment of the living conditions of the 
Canadian people since 1939. 

(4) The obligation of the employers to 
continue real wage increases which 
were interrupted during the war 
years. 

(5) The necessity for giving railway 
employees financial recognition for 
their productivity and efficiency 
which has nearly doubled during the 
last twenty years. 

(6) The wish of the .Canadian railway 
employees to regain wage parity 
with U.S. railway employees which 
existed from 1918 to 1922. 

(7) The deterioration of the economic 
position of the Canadian railway 
employees in relation to other Cana- 
dian wage earners. 

In view of the fact that the above figure 
of 45 cents has been stated by the organ- 
izations to be the amount required to bring 
about parity between the Canadian and 
the United States non-operating railway 
worker, it might be desirable to begin 
with a consideration of No. 6 of the above 
heads, but we think it more convenient to 
deal first with Nos. 1 to 4, and as these 
are interrelated, we propose to consider 
them as a group. 

In the examination of the relation 
obtaining between wages on the one hand 
and the cost-of-living index on the other, 
as a basis upon which the union demand 
for an increase might be measured, the 
unions reject the year 1939 as a proper 
starting point, although from the way in 
which head 2 above is stated, it might 
appear that that year was being taken as 
a base year. As put by them in their 
written statement: — 

The brotherhoods have repeatedly 
declared that they refuse to use the 
year 1939 as the basic year for any wage 
determination. The start of any discus- 
sion could be March 1, 1948. 

March 1, 1948, was the date to which, 
under an agreement between the parties 



56 



of the 16th of July, 1948, the wage in- 
crease of 17 cents per hour thereby pro- 
vided for, was made retroactive. Since that 
time, however, under the provisions of the 
Maintenance of Railway Operation Act, 
14-15 Geo. VI, c. 1, enacted August 30, 
1950, wage rates were increased by an 
additional 7 cents and standard hours of 
work were reduced from 48 to 40 hours 
per week, overtime rates applying to any 
excess. The effective date of the increase 
in wages was "the day on which the 
employees return to work pursuant to this 
Act," which may be taken to have been 
August 31. The effective date on which 
the actual reduction of hours took place 
was June 1, 1951. It is the contention of 
the railways that this last mentioned date 
is the date which should be taken as the 
starting point. 

Reference to the award made in the 
arbitration under the statute of 1950 shows 
that an analagous situation arose there, 
the unions contending that the point of 
departure from which the relation between 
wage rates and the cost-of-living index 
should have been regarded on September 1, 
1950, was the year 1948 after the settle- 
ment then effected. They contended that 
the increase of 17 cents granted at that 
time, however unwillingly agreed to on 
either side, had established a new standard 
of living for the employees, and that there 
should be no attempt to go behind the 
wage rate — cost-of-living relationship then 
established. 

The railways, on the other hand, were 
contending that 1939 was the proper start- 
ing point, a time, in their view, of 
comparative stability. On this issue the 
arbitrator decided that he could not re-try 
the merits of the dispute of 1948, and 
accordingly took June 1, 1948, as the 
starting point from which to consider the 
situation which existed in September 1950, 
in view of the fact that, although the date 
of the settlement was July 16. 1948, and 
was made retroactive to March 1 of that 
year, the cost-of-living figure as of June 
1 had then been published. In his 
opinion, the settlement must have taken 
into consideration all the then known facts. 

Similarly, in the present instance, we 
think that the proper starting point should 
be September 1, 1950, for the reason that, 
although the 40-hour week was not to 
come into operation until June 1, 1951, 
the statute required that due regard be 
given to that fact in setting the wage rate 
increase ultimately fixed at 7 cents as of 
the date of the return to work. In other 
words, the statute operated to effect a 



settlement upon and from September 1950, 
although the employees continued to work 
the longer hours until June 1, 1951. 

The cost-of-living index on September 1, 
1950, stood at 169-8 and had risen by 
September 1, 1952, to 186-5, an increase 
of 16-7 points or 9-8 per cent. The 
average hourly rate on September 1, 1950, 
after the increase of 7 cents, was 108-9 
cents for the then existing standard work 
week of 48 hours, or its equivalent for 40 
hours, 129-3 cents. Increasing this rate by 
9-8 per cent gives 12*67 cents as the 
amount required to adjust the wage rate 
to the increase in the cost of living since 
September 1, 1950. 

The above result may be checked on 
the basis of average weekly earnings. In 
the case of* the 148,463 non-operating 
employees concerned in the arbitration of 
1950, the standard work week was 48 hours 
for all except the 21,500 back-shop 
employees who were on a 44-hour week. 
The average work week was accordingly 
47*4 hours and weekly earnings $51.62. 
Increasing this by 9*8 per cent, the indi- 
cated weekly rate is $56.68, showing a 
deficiency in the present rate of $4.96 or 
12*4 cents per hour. 

The evidence shows that since the year 
1939, a substantial majority of the non- 
operating railway employees are, at present 
rates, in receipt of larger real wages than 
at that time. There are some 280 different 
wage or occupational groups involved. 

It would be a simple matter either to 
increase all groups by 9-8 per cent or to 
use the amount of money thereby involved 
to increase the rates payable to those 
groups who are not as well off as in 1939 
in terms of real wages so as to restore 
them to the position they enjoyed in 1939 
or even in September 1950. Such a course 
would seem more reasonable than to give 
the same increase in cents per hour to all 
employees, which would have the effect of 
improving further the position of those 
who are already as well or better off 
without, perhaps, placing the remainder in 
the position they enjoyed in 1939. 

The unions, however, avoid putting their 
case on any such basis. Apparently, no one 
union has so far been willing to accept less 
in the way of an increase in cents per hour ' 
than any other. This being the case,'" 
although the unions criticize the use of 
average figures for the purpose of-'- ascer- 
taining the figure necessary to Restore real 
wages, there appears to be no other way 
of considering the adequacy of present 
rates. If regard is not to be had to the 
individual rates, it is the average that must 
be considered. 



67040—5 



57 



The unions express some criticism also of 
the use of the present cost-of-living index 
on the ground that it is based on a fixed list 
of items established some years ago, since 
which time, it is contended, the scope of the 
average family budget has changed. The 
index, however, was established only as a 
means of measuring price changes and, at 
the time of the hearings, there was no other 
standard of measurement available for such 
purpose. Both parties before the Board 
have used it throughout. 



It was to meet criticisms of this 
character that the new Consumers' Price 
Index was instituted, its first publication 
having occurred subsequent to the hear- 
ings. This new index covers a broader 
budget of items than the old index. It is 
perhaps worth while to set out the two 
indices on a comparative basis since 
September 1, 1950. The new consumer 
price index is based on 1949=100. The 
comparative table is as follows:— 



Date 


New 
Consumers' 
Price Index 

Base: 
1949 = 100 


Old C. of L. 

Index 

Base: 

1949 = 100 


Old C. of L. 

Index 

Base: 
1935-39 = 100 


Sept. 1, 1950 

Juno 1, 1951 


104-3 
113-7 
116-1 
11G-0 
116-1 


105-6 
114-5 
116-9 
116-7 
116-0 


169-8 
184-1 


Julv 1, K52 

Aue. 1, lf52 


1880 
187-6 


•Sept. 1, 1£62 


186-5 



If one employ the new consumer price 
index for the purpose of measuring the 
spread between the wage rate and the cost 
of living (using that phrase in the popular 
sense), between September 1950 and 
September 1952, it will be found that the 
new index shows a rise of 11-3 per cent 
compared with 9-8 per cent when the old 
index is used. Applying the increase of 
11-3 per cent to the existing rate of 129-3 
cents per hour, an increase of 14-6 cents 
is called for, or 15 cents to the nearest 
cent. We think that the use of the new 
index is proper for this purpose rather than 
the old because of the fact that it is 
broader in the scope of items covered. 

Checking the above calculation by in- 
creasing by the same percentage weekly 
earnings of $51.62 for the standard work 
week of 47-4 hours existing in Augusl 
1950, the weekly amount becomes $57.45. 
while actual earnings for the present 40 
hour week are $51.72. The deficiency is 
$5.73 per week, or 14-3 cents per hour. 

The unions have taken the point that 
the cost-of-living index does not include 
income tax and that wage deficiencies are 
"increased by the fact that the take-home 
pay of employees is greatly affected by 
the increase in income tax payments since 
1939." The argument is that, as "corpora- 
tion profits or corporation income is 
discussed in corporation reports mostly in 
terms of net earnings after payment of 
corporation tax," the "take T home pay" of 
the employee should be considered on!y 
after deduction of income tax payments. 
This argument is, in effect, a claim that 
railway employees are to be relieved of 



the payment of income tax in the form of 
increased wages. In our view, surely no 
one group in the community can make such 
a claim. 

With respect to the point that the 
employees here concerned have not 
benefited proportionately with their 
fellows in the increase of Canadian pros- 
perity since 1939, it is contended by the 
unions that the per capita disposable 
income of the Canadian citizen after pay- 
ment of income tax had increased by 1950 
approximately 50 per cent over and above 
the 1939 level. This does not appear to 
be so, however. In the consideration of 
this question it is necessary to recall that 
in the year 1939 there were some 523,000 
unemployed persons, or some 11 per cent 
of the entire labour force. In addition 
there was a very substantial amount of 
unemployment on farms and elsewhere, 
which was not included in the unemploy- 
ment statistics. Increases in national pro- 
duction was influenced by bringing into use 
these unemployed or under-employed per- 
sons, and the increased production would 
have to be spread over these additional 
workers as well as in bringing up the 
earnings of such workers to established 
levels. From 1939 to 1951 the number of 
people engaged on farms decreased by 
30-6 per cent, while farm production in- 
creased from $458,000,000 to $1,167,000,000, 
an increase of $896 or 266-7 per cent per 
capita. 

Again, the number of persons operating 
unincorporated businesses decreased in the 



58 



same period by 18-9 per cent, while the 
value of their production increased from 
$460,000,000 to $806,000,000 or 116-2 per 
cent on a per capita basis. Further, the 
number of people working for salaries and 
wages in industries other than agriculture 
in the same period increased by 77 per 
cent and the amount paid such persons in- 
creased from $2,480,000,000 to $4,783,000,000, 
an increase of 8-8 per cent per capita. 
Accordingly, it would appear that it is this 
last mentioned figure which represents the 
per capita increase in national production 
of the group to which the employees here 
in question belong. Looking at the situa- 
tion with respect to the wage rates here 
in question, it appears that in 1939 the 
average hourly earnings of the non- 
operating railway employees were 57-9 
cents, and in 1952, 70-5 cents, an increase 
of 21-8 per cent. All of the above dollar 
figures are in constant dollars. 

Considerations of this character are, 
however, necessarily very general. A much 
more specific basis for the inquiry as to 
whether or not a given group in the 
community is receiving its due participa- 
tion in the national income is furnished 
by a comparison of the return derived by 
such group for its labour with the return 
to other groups in the community whose 
working conditions can be said to be com- 
parable. We shall postpone consideration 
of this aspect of the matter until a later 
stage. It is essentially bound up with the 
seventh of the heads of claim upon which 
the case for the employees is based. 

In support of their fourth ground of 
claim, "the obligation of the employers 
to continue real wage increases which were 
interrupted during the war years," the 
unions point to the trend shown by the 
index of average steam railway real wages 
based on the index of wage rates published 
by the federal Department of Labour, 
which shows an increase of 1-99 per cent 
annually in the period 1913 to 1950. This 
rate of increase is compared with the 
Canadian general average of 2-7 per cent. 
The unions point out that in 1943 the 
index of real wages of steam railway 
employees stood at 171 2 as against the 
general average of 171-0. Since 1943 the 
general average had risen to 200-4 by 
April 1952, while the index for steam rai 1 - 
ways rose as high as 189-0 but had 
declined to 177-0 by that time. The 
inference which the unions seek to draw 
from these figures is that because steam 
railways show a lesser rise than the general 
average, therefore railway wages have not 
kept pace with the other industries in- 
cluded in the general Canadian average. 



We do not think that such a conclusion 
is sound. Unless the relation existing 
between wage rates in 1939 is known, it is 
quite impossible to use the above indices 
to establish the proposition that a greater 
percentage rise in one industry than in 
another or others establishes a state of 
deficiency in those showing the lesser 
increase. An industry already paying a 
high rate in 1939 might well not show as 
great an increase by 1952 as an industry 
in which the rate paid in 1939 was low. 
To bring the point closer to the matter 
in hand, in 1939, according to the Annual 
Review of Employment and Payrolls issued 
by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in 
1951, the annual average of weekly wages 
and salaries for all manufacturing indus- 
tries was S22-.79, as compared with the 
figure for steam railways of $30.17. The 
increase in the case of all manufacturing 
to 1951 was $28.46, as compared with an 
increase for steam railways of $27.51. To 
speak of the result in percentages only, 
namely, 125 per cent for manufacturing as 
compared with 91 per cent for steam rail- 
ways, does not give the proper perspective. 

It would therefore appear that, far from 
being an industry in which earnings in 
1939 were low, steam railways were well 
ahead of manufacturing industries as a 
whole. 

The fifth ground upon which the wage 
claim is put is that of increased produc- 
tivity and efficiency on the part of railway 
employees in the performance of their 
duties, which they say has "nearV doubVd 
during the last twenty years." They esti- 
mate that the productivity of the Canadian 
labour force has risen 85 per cent since 
1939, and claim that railway employees 
are no exception. Xo basis, however, upon 
which measurement of increased produc- 
tivity in the case of railway emp^yees can 
be made is suggested other than what is 
described as admittedly "a very rough 
approach." On the basis of freight tons 
carried as related to the total number of 
employees (654 tons per employee in 1939 
as against 757 tons in 1950). an increase 
of 15-8 per cent over 1939 is shown. As 
the employees themselves say. however, 
employee productivity is in reality the 
productivity of the industry as a whole, 
and other factors than the efficiency of 
the individual worker are a'so responsible 
for any increase in productivity. The 
abihtv of a worker to produce is deter- 
mined by the conditions under which he 
works, the character and capacity of tools. 
machines or equipment, the amount of 
power with which lie is supplied; the 
effectiveness with which management 



070 40—5 J 



59 



organizes and supervises his movements ; his 
hours of labour; and his own competency. 
The employees refer to the fact that the 
percentage of the total payroll of the 
Canadian Pacific Railway charged to oper- 
ating expenses in 1951, which was, accord- 
ing to the annual reports, 7-4 per cent 
smaller than in 1939, as "proof of the 
tendency of payroll expenditure to 
decrease in proportion to total expenditure." 
This is not a deduction which can be made 
for the purpose stated, however, for the 
reason that, as pointed out by the rail- 
ways, the figures to which the employees 
refer show that in 1939 the percentage of 
total payroll charged to total operating 
expenses in the case of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway was 61 per cent and in 
1941, 55-35 per cent. Although the figures 
fluctuated between 1941 and 1945, reaching 
a low of 51-76 per cent in that year, there- 
after the figures increase to 56-45 per cent 
in 1951. It is said by the railways that 
the major reason for the drop from 1939 
to 1941 was the adoption of depreciation 
accounting in 1940, resulting thereafter in 
regular depreciation charges to operating 
expenses in place of retirement charges 
made only when equipment was actually 
retired from the company's books. 

On the part of the railways, two bases 
are suggested for the purpose of measuring 
increased productivity, the first being on 
the basis of traffic units, namely, a com- 
bination of revenue ton miles and revenue 
passenger miles, weighted according to the 
formula adopted by the Inter-State Com- 
merce Commission of the United States. 
The second basis suggested is gross ton 
miles in the case of freight service. 
Similar figures in passenger service are not 
available. On the first basis of traffic units 
per man hour, the increase from 1939 to 
1950 is 17 per cent, while the increase on 
the second basis of gross ton miles per 
man hour, is 12-1 per cent. The railways 
explain the difference between the two as 
being related to the very large increase in 
passenger business during and since the war. 
It is said that variations in passenger busi- 
ness can be handled with much less change 
in man hours worked than is the case with 
variations in freight business. However 
this may be, these figures do show a 
substantial increase. 

The quotation from the employees' 
statement referred to above is, however, 
again applicable, namely, that the increase 
is attributable to all the factors in the 
industry. While the employees in the 
railway industry, as in any other industry, 
should be entitled to share with manage- 



ment and the public generally in produc- 
tivity gains, there is no way of showing 
that, in view of the increase in real wages 
since 1939, they have not done so. 

Coming to the sixth head of claim, the 
demand for an increase of 45 cents per 
hour for each and every employee, an 
increase on the average of 35 per cent, is 
to place the non-operating employee on 
the same wage scale as that which prevails 
on United States railways. As put by the 
employees, this demand is based on the 
"principle of equal pay for equal work," 
which is a reasonable and understandable 
principle where governing conditions are the 
same. For example, two men equally 
qualified, doing the same work in the same 
shop may reasonably expect to be 
remunerated on the same basis, and the 
same is no doubt true throughout a given 
locality. The evidence before the Board 
indicates, however, that this is a principle 
which is not always applied in fact 
throughout the length and breadth of this 
country where the going rates in urban 
centres may differ from- those current in 
the same trades in less populous places. 
The same is true as between different 
geographical sections of the country. 

In considering the question as to the 
adequacy or inadequacy of any particular 
wage rate or set of rates, some standard 
of measurement is necessary, and if the 
governing conditions were the same or 
reasonably similar, the standard furnished 
by the wage scale paid to American rail- 
way employees would no doubt constitute 
a standard by which the scale of wages 
paid to Canadian railway employees might 
well be judged. The question is as to 
whether or not the governing circum- 
stances in the two countries are comparable. 

The emplo3'ees point out in the first 
place that, commencing in 1918 and for 
some years thereafter, equality as between 
the two countries did exist in that the 
scale of wages fixed by the McAdoo award 
in the United States was by Order in 
Council of the Government of Canada 
applied to all railway lines in Canada. The 
situation thus brought about arising out 
of conditions due to the war of 1914-1918 
continued until 1922, and during this 
period both wages and freight rates in 
Canada followed a course generally similar 
to that obtaining in the United States, 
although the level of Canadian freight rates 
did not quite attain that in the United 
States. Since 1922 the history of wage and 
freight rate changes in the two countries 
has diverged. Without going into the 
matter in detail, it is sufficient to say that 



60 



after 1922 freight rates advanced in the 
United States, and since June 30, 1946, 
have amounted to an effective advance of 
78-9 per cent. In the same period wage 
rate increases on United States railways 
have borne a close relationship to in- 
creases in freight rates. 

On the other hand, from 1922 to 1948 
there was no change in general freight 
rates in Canada although there were 
changes in individual rates made necessary 
by local conditions. Between 1941 and 
1943 wages were increased by the wartime 
cost-of-living bonus which was followed by 
wage increases in 1944 and 1946, with the 
inclusion of the cost-of-living bonus in the 
basic rates in 1944. These were again 
followed by an increase of 17 cents per 
hour in 1948 and a further increase of 
7 cents on August 31, 1950, with a reduc- 
tion in working hours from 48 to 40 
becoming effective June 1, 1951. Increased 
freight rates were also authorized in 1949, 
1950 and 1952. 

The employees point out that the Cana- 
dian railways now pay to the American 
employees of roads owned by them in the 
United States the American scale of rates, 
and further, that United States railroads 
operating in Canada pay their Canadian 
employees on the American scale. The 
employees also allege that certain Cana- 
dian steel companies have put into effect 
in their plants wage scales current in the 
-steel industry in the United States. The 
unions take the position expressly that 
railway "revenues do not enter into wage 
determination," and that "railway freights 
and revenue are of no concern to" this 
Board. That is to say in effect, as we 
understand it, that the question as to 
whether or not the railways can obtain 
freight and passenger rates which would 
permit them to pay wages on the American 
scale is a matter to which this Board 
should pay no attention in passing on the 
claim for payment to these employees of 
a wage rate commensurate with the 
American scale. While a conciliation board, 
it is true, has nothing to do with the fixing 
of freight or passenger rates, it can scarcely 
be claimed that this Board should accept 
the mere fact of the payment by the 
American railways of a certain wage scale 
as conclusive of the propriety of the claim 
to payment of the same scale by Canadian 
railways. 

When one comes to consider the per 
capita gross national product in Canada 
and the United States over any relevant 
period such as from 1946 to 1951, one finds 
that while the Canadian figure in the first 



of the 3^ears mentioned was $931 and rose 
in the last mentioned year to $1,440, the 
corresponding American figures were $1,509 
and $2,123. All these figures are in 
American dollars. The Canadian economy 
is one based on the exchange of a number 
of primary or semi-processed products as 
against the importation of a large number of 
products produced outside the country. In 
1951 the relationship of exports to gross 
national product was 18-4 per cent, whereas 
in the United States the corresponding 
figure was 4-6 per cent. Accordingly, to a 
much greater extent than is the case with 
the United States, Canadian prices are 
determined in a world market and not inter- 
nally. The smaller domestic market for 
many of its products, together with the 
greater dependence on outside markets for 
the disposal of so much of its product, 
creates of itself a fundamental difference 
in the economy of Canada when compared 
with the United States, and provides an 
explanation for the higher level of wages 
in the latter country. 

The unions point to the prosperity of 
the Canadian pulp and paper industry in 
support of their proposition that wage 
levels do not enter into "export possi- 
bilities" of Canadian products. That 
industry, however, is not free from the 
influence of world competition as was seen 
during the 1930's when it was depressed. 
The natural advantages of the industry in 
the way of supply and accessibility of raw 
materials and power may well help to 
explain its current prosperity and ability 
to pay wages which approach the American 
scale. In the month of March 1952, for 
example, the average hourly earnings of 
employees in the pulp and paper industry 
in Canada were approximately 10-4 per 
cent below the United States figure. The" 
tobacco industry in Canada provides a 
similar illustration. The wage level in both 
countries in March 1952 was practically 
the same. 

However, if one compared the corre- 
sponding figures for all manufacturing in 
Canada and the United States at the 
period mentioned, the American figure was 
some 28-3 per cent higher than the Cana- 
dian: the durable goods industry was 24-9 
per cent higher; shipbuilding and repairing 
40-5 per cent; automobile 21-4 per cent; 
electrical apparatus and supplies 21-9 per 
cent; machinery manufacturing 35-9 per 
cent; agricultural implements 18-7 per 
cent; transportation equipment 31-6 per 
cent; non-ferrous metals smelting and 
refining 12-3 per cent; chemical and allied 
products 27*9 per cent; rubber products 



61 



33-5 per cent; and coal mining 48-9 per 
cent — to give some examples only. It 
would appear that the governing condi- 
tions surrounding the various industries 
mentioned must be essentially different in 
the two countries. 

Information furnished by the railways 
based on data applicable to the year 1951 
shows that the population of Canada per 
mile of railroad was 328 as against the 
United States figure of 662, and that the 
relevant figure for eastern Canada was 527 
as against 1,043 in the case of territory 
served by the New York Central Railroad 
and 1,106 in the case of territory served 



by the Pennsylvania Railroad. In western 
Canada the corresponding figure was 161 
as against 367 in the case of territory served 
by the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy 
Railroad, the Great Northern and Northern 
Pacific Railroads. None of the named 
American railroads is a transcontinental 
railway as is the case with the Canadian 
National and Canadian Pacific Railways, 
but the American railways mentioned serve 
as a convenient example with respect to 
the situation in eastern and western Canada 
respectively. 

Again the higher density of population in 
the United States as compared with Canada 
is reflected in the following figures: — 



Revenue Fit 

Ton Miles 

per Mile 

of Road 

(000) 



Passenger 

Miles per 

Mile of Road 

(000) 



Operating 
Revenues 
per Mile 
of Road 



Canadian Railways 

Canadian National (Lines in Canada) 

Canadian Pacific Ry 

U.S. Class 1 Roads 

Canadian National (Eastern Lines). . . 

Canadian Pacific (Eastern Lines) 

New York Central R.R 

Pennsylvania R.R 

Canadian National (Western Lines).. 

Canadian Pacific (Western Lines) 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R.R. . . 

Great Northern Ry 

Northern Pacific Ry 



1,479 
1,427 
1,577 
2,862 
1,711 
1,991 
3,813 
5,414 
1,144 
1,365 
2,111 
2,168 
1,716 



71 

67 

79 

153 

101 

139 

377 

478 

33 

48 

94 

71 

48 



24,911 
24,312 
25,217 
45,994 
33,866 
38,523 
75,233 
103,139 
14,817 
18,393 
30,212 
29,827 
25,228 



Comparative revenue figures per mile of road in Canada and the United States in the 
period 1946 to 1951 show the following: — 





Freight Revenue per Mile of Road 


Year 


All Canadian 
Railways 


Canadian 

Nafl. 
(Lines in 
Canada ) 


Canadian 
Pacific 


U.S. Class 1 
Roads 


1946 

1947 . 


12,558 
14,365 
16,516 
16,504 
17,895 
20,039 

Total Ope 

16,967 
18,556 
20, 702 
20,866 
22,311 
24,911 


11,904 
13,309 
15,301 

15,484* 

16,859 

19,132 

rating Revenu 

16,177 

17,364 

19,447 

19,844* 

21,268 

24,312 


12,769 
14,668 
16,785 
17,150 
17,983 
20,662 

es per Mile of 

17,289 
18,857 
20,857 
21,329 
22,244 
25,217 


25,406 
30,89' 


1948 .. 


35,153 


1949 


31,112 


1950 .. 


34,544 


1951 .. 


38,219 


1946 


Road 

33,489 


1947 


38,104 


1948 


42,625 


1949 


37,874 


1950 


41.862 


1951 


45.994 







♦Excluding Newfoundland district. 

When one comes to consider the traffic handled per emploj^ee on railways in the two 
countries in the same period as above, the situation is as follows: — 







Operating Revenues per Employee 






1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 




4,415 
5,612 


$ 

4,723 
6,424 


5,125 
7,291 


$ 
5. 107 
7,198 


$ 
5,602 
7,762 


ft 
5.710 


U.S. Class 1 Roads 


8,144 







62 



The situation disclosed by the last mentioned figures is reflected in the relation of 
operating revenues to each dollar paid in wages given for the same period: — 

OPERATING REVENUES RELATED TO EACH DOLLAR PAID IN WAGES 1946-51 



Year 


All ( Canadian 

Railways 


Class 1 

Railroads 
in the U.S. 


1940 


$ 

1.99 
2.00 

1.89 
1 89 
2.01 
1.94 


$ 

1 92 


1947 


2.10 


1948 


2.13 


1949 


2.05 


1950 


2.16 


1951 


2.07 







•Estimated 

It will be observed that in the case of 
the Canadian railways each dollar spent in 
wages in the year 1951 produced less 
revenue than had been the case in 1946, 
notwithstanding the increases in freight 
rates in the interim. 

The railways also point out that the 
Canadian railways labour under a further 
disadvantage with respect to American 
railroads in the generally higher cost of 
equipment, materials and supplies in 
Canada, and they state that, with respect 
to nine items which the railways were 
obliged to purchase in 1951, the cost to 
the Canadian railways exceeded by 
approximately $50,000,000 the cost of the 



same articles in the United States. The 
railways admit, however, that with respect 
to such items as ties and lumber, they 
enjoyed an advantage over American rail- 
roads in the same year to the extent of 
$1,650,000, but they say that with this 
exception and that of steel tires, costs to 
the Canadian railways of necessary sup- 
plies are in excess of the prices for which 
the American railways are able to purchase 
the same commodities, the percentage 
ranging from 6-5 for brake shoes to 61-7 
for rolled steel wheels, while coal, the 
largest single item of consumption, shows 
an excess of 53-8 per cent. The result of 
the differing situations in the two coun- 
tries is illustrated in the following table: — 



OPERATING RATIOS OF RAILWAYS IN CANADA AND THE U.S. 



Year 


All Canadian 
Railways 


U.S. Class 1 
Roads 


Can. Nat. 
fin Can.) 


Canadian 
Pacific 


1916 


86-8 
8«-0 
92-3 
92-6 
86-9 
89-9 


83-3 
78-3 
77-3 
80-3 
74-5 
77-4 


88-2 
91-9 
96-6 
96-9 
91-1 
94-4 


86-5 


1947 


87-0 


1948 


91-8 


1949 


91-9 


1950 


85-5 


1951 


88-9 







The present request of the employees 
would involve a cost to the railways of 
$158,370,210. The total net operating 
income of the Canadian National and 
Canadian Pacific Railways in 1951 was 
848.600,000. 

There would appear, therefore, to be 
nothing in the above review of the Cana- 
dian economy as opposed to that of the 
United States to suggest that the railways 
industry in Canada should be able to 
operate on the same basis as the industry 
in the United States, from the standpoint 
of wage scales. 

While at first glance, therefore, the 
American railway industry might seem to 
offer a reasonable standard by which the 
Canadian railway wage rate could be 
measured, the validity of any such com- 
parison disappears on analysis. Governing 



conditions are not the same or reasonably 
similar, and accordingly, some other 
standard of measurement must be looked 
for. 

In connection with the seventh head 
under which the unions state their claim, 
namely, "the deterioration of the economic 
position of the Canadian railway employees 
in relation to other Canadian wage 
earners,'' they state that 

During the last two decades a great 
change has taken place in the economic 
position of the railway employees within 
the general Canadian wage structure. 
Some decades ago the special skill, the 
gfeat amount of responsibility and hazards 
connected with railway work received 
their proper financial recognition. Slowly 
the railway worker has lost all his gains. 
His remuneration has fallen below earn- 



63 



ings in other industries and his wage 
increases are smaller than those obtained 
by other workers in Canada. 

We have considered this statement with 
respect only to the non-operating railway 
workers who are the concern of this 
inquiry. They look back to a time when 
their earnings were in excess of other 
industrial groups in the community. The 
present request is for the restoration of 
former conditions, but the point of view 
set forth in the paragraph quoted above 
does not inquire into the reason for the 
fact to which attention is drawn, namely, 
that "other workers in Canada" during the 
last two decades have received greater 
wage increases than the railway workers. 
In so far as the non-railway groups are 
called upon to exercise comparable skills 
and to measure up to comparable respon- 
sibilities, there would not appear to have 
been or to be any valid reason why the 
one should ever have had or should now 
receive more in the way of remuneration 
than the other. It surely cannot be a valid 
reason for now paying greater remunera- 
tion to the railway group, simply that its 
remuneration has been in fact greater than 
other groups in the past. It seems to us 
that if the non-operating railway employees 
receive or should be placed on a basis of 
comparable remuneration for comparable 
work vis-a-vis other groups in the com- 
munity, the case of the railway worker 
cannot, in justice to the other groups or 
to the community as a whole, be put on 
any higher basis. 

In elaboration of their point of view, 
the unions refer again to the increase in 
the index of the general average of wage 
rates of all industries in Canada between 
1913 and 1952 in comparison with the 
history of the index of steam railway 
rates. It is sought to be contended on the 
basis of these figures that the wages of 
the railway workers have "lagged behind" 
those in other industries by some 53 per 
cent. 

More specific comparisons are made 
between the increases since 1913 in certain 
named industries and the increases in the 
case of steam railways, and a similar 
comparison is made with respect to the 
period since 1939. For example, it is 
pointed out that in April 1952 the index 
of wage rates in the case of the logging 
industry stood at 251-3 over 1939, mining 
232-5, manufacturing 266-2, construction 
219-0, transportation and communication 
218-7, laundries 237-2; while in the case 
of steam railways it was, as already stated, 
207-4. 



We have already pointed out the 
unsoundness of this argument and it is 
not necessary to repeat that discussion. 

In the inquiry as to a standard furnished 
by industry outside the railway industry 
with which wage rates in the railway 
industry -may be justly compared, it is 
obvious, as already indicated, that the 
criteria of comparison should include as 
far as is reasonably possible, such matters 
as similarity of work and working condi- 
tions, similarity in the proportions of male 
and female employees and skilled, semi- 
skilled and unskilled workers, as well as 
wide territorial distribution and regularity 
of employment. 

With respect to the last mentioned, the 
parties are agreed that railway employ- 
ment offers a high degree of security. The 
unions in their written statement say 
"Work on the railways becomes a family 
tradition, the son proudly follows his 
father in the same employment, the 
daughter works in the offices of the same 
company, and brothers and sons-in-law 
continue the family tradition." It is also 
said that "railway service is a lifetime 
career." The fact that such statements 
can be made indicates that in the past, at 
least, most railway occupations have offered 
stability of employment. 

Railway occupations cover a wide range, 
from that of the skilled craftsman to the 
unskilled labourer, and the distribution of 
the employees is across the entire country, 
in areas where industry is concentrated and 
where wages generally are high, as well 
as in less concentrated or agricultural areas 
where rates are lower. For a majority of 
railway occupations, rates of pay, also, are 
uniform across the country, and where 
differences still exist, these are rather 
between eastern and western Canada than 
between larger and smaller geographical 
areas. The railway wage structure has been 
developed by collective bargaining over a 
long period of time and recognized rela- 
tionships have been established between 
rates of pay for various occupations. As 
a result, the adjustment of any particular 
rate may be impossible without changing 
the rates of a number of occupations which 
may already compare favourably with 
rates paid generally in outside industry. 

Again, the railways, by agreement with 
their employees, have, with respect to the 
mechanical trades, established one uniform 
rate for the fully-qualified craftsman 
rather than different rates for each trade, 
and less provision is made in the railway 
wage structure for grading craftsmen in 
different classes than is the practice in 



64 



outside industry. Accordingly, if the 
adequacy or inadequacy of each several 
wage rate within the railway wage struc- 
ture is not to be tested by comparable 
particular rates in outside industry in the 
same area of the country (and the unions 
reject this approach), it is obvious that it 
cannot be said that the railway wage 
structure as a whole is inadequate because 
a particular wage rate in a particular area 
may be found to be deficient when com- 
pared with the rate paid for the same 
occupation in outside industry. The search 
for a standard of comparison of the non- 
operating railway employees as a whole 
must be answered by one which will 
furnish the same or similar diversity of 
occupation and wide-spread distribution 
throughout the country, as well as the 
other matters to which we have already 
referred. 

In the arbitration under the Maintenance 
of Railway Operation Act, 1950, it was 
thought by the arbitrator that a proper 
standard of comparison was furnished by 
the durable goods industry, which com- 
prises the following industries: "Wood 
Products, Iron and Steel Products, Trans- 
portation Equipment, Non-ferrous Metal 
Products, Electrical Apparatus and Supplies, 
and Non-metallic Mineral Products. 

The group of industries comprising 
durable goods includes the major heavy 
industries, particularly those based on iron 
and steel and the manufacture of equip- 
ment. It has a relatively low proportion 
of women workers and from this stand- 
point gives a comparison in keeping with 
the composition of the non-operating rail- 
way group which is largely male, except 
for office workers. Of approximately 
143,000 non-operating railway workers, 
approximately 7 per cent are female. In 
the durable goods industry the correspond- 
ing figure is 10 per cent, although in the 
electrical goods industry, for example, 
female employees make up 28 per cent 
of the whole. The average earnings of 
durable goods employees have been con- 
sistently higher than non-durable goods, 
and higher also than the average of all 
manufacturing industries. While the 
present inquiry is concerned with the 
adequacy or inadequacy of "rates," the use 
of earnings for purposes of comparison is 
valid provided earnings are not distorted 
in the one case or the other by items not 
common to both. 

Criticism of the validity of the com- 
parison of railway earnings with earnings 



in the durable goods industry is made by 
the unions on the basis that in the former, 
salaried personnel are included, while in the 
latter, only hourly rated employees are 
included. It is said that the salaried 
railway personnel included in the railway 
figures are generally more highly paid than 
employees who are paid on an hourly basis. 
As put by the employees in their written 
statement : — 

The average earnings figures of railway 
employees are brought up by the addition 
of salaried employees, while the exclusion 
of salaried personnel in DBS statistics of 
durable goods industries brings the 
average figure down. The railways have 
also included in the average figure 
certain groups of clerks whose pay is 
above and outside the collective agree- 
ments. 

The italicizing is ours. 

This statement, however, involves a 
misconception, as the earnings figures in 
the case of the railway employees to which 
reference will be made does not in fact 
include the higher salaried employees at 
all. The salaried employees whose earn- 
ings are included in the railway figures 
have a lower average earning than the 
rest of their fellows among the non- 
operating employees. Accordingly, the 
inclusion of these salaried employees does 
not affect the railway figure in the way 
the employees contend, but, if anything, 
has a contrary effect. The situation in 
the durable goods industry appears to 
furnish an exact parallel in this respect in 
that, for example, in the figures for the 
week ending October 31, 1951 (a period 
when a particular study of the matter was 
made by the Dominion Bureau of 
Statistics), the average weekly earnings of 
office workers was $54.16 as against S56.36 
for hourly rated employees. It is to the 
earnings of the hourly rated employees only 
that we refer for purposes of comparison. 

It may be pointed out here also that 
the durable goods figures include what are 
known as "shift differentials," and that the 
figures are to that extent enhanced. 

The use of the durable goods industry 
as a basis of comparison is also criticized 
by the employees on the ground that it 
includes the wood products industry. It 
is said that furniture making and work in 
saw and planing mills or in the making 
of miscellaneous wood products where 
semi-skilled or unskilled workers are 
employed and where the work is to some 
degree seasonal, renders the comparison 
inappropriate. 



65 



It is to be noted, however, that the 
railways themselves operate planing mills, 
the lumber being used in the construction 
and repair of railway freight cars, and the 
railways claim that they pay higher rates 
for this work than is paid in saw and 
planing mills generally. 

The employees make a similar objection 
based on the inclusion in durable goods of 
the non-metallic minerals industry, which is 
composed of the clay products and glass 
products industries. The employees in this 
industry are, however, a comparatively 
small group, comprising in August 1952 
some 20,000 out of a total of some 430,000 
durable goods employees, and the average 
weekly earnings in the non-metallic min- 
erals industry in August 1952 were $57.19, 
and in the durable goods industry as a 
whole, $57.43. 

Objection is again made on the ground 
of the inclusion in durable goods of the 
electrical apparatus and supplies industry, 
for the reason that it is composed of 28 
per cent female workers while there are 
only 7 per cent female employees among 
the railway group. However, the over-all 
percentage of female employees in the 
durable goods industry is 10 per cent. 
Moreover, the average hourly rate in elec- 
trical goods as at July 1, 1952, was higher 
than the average for the durable goods 
industry as a whole. Accordingly, the 
inclusion of electrical goods has an 
enhancing rather than a lowering effect on 
the durable goods figures. 

Reference is also made by the employees 
to the award of 1950 in which the arbitrator 
made comment with respect to "motor 
vehicles, parts and accessories" which is 
one of the groups included in the trans- 
portation equipment industry. It is 
apparent, however, that in that comment, 
the arbitrator was dealing with a conten- 
tion that railway earnings should be com- 
pared with earnings in the motor vehicles, 
parts and accessories industry alone, a 
suggestion not advanced in the present 
inquiry. 

The employees also point to the fact 
that the transportation equipment industry 
(part of the durable goods group), includes 
"railroad and rolling stock equipment" 
which includes some non-operating railway 
employees. It is therefore said that, to 
the extent of this inclusion, the comparison 
is really a comparison of the same thing 
with itself. 



In August 1952 the average weekly earn- 
ings 'of the transportation equipment worker 
were $58.85, while, as already mentioned, 
the corresponding figure for durable goods 
as a whole was $57.43. If one were to 
exclude the workers employed by the rail- 
way companies, the figure $58.85 would 
become $60.68, and the corresponding 
figure for durable goods would become 
$57.81 instead of $57.43. This is not an 
appreciable change. 

It would not constitute a valid com- 
parison for present purposes to compare 
non-operating railway workers with workers 
in any one of the industries comprising 
the durable goods group, and it is not 
proposed to do so. The proposed com- 
parison is between non-operating railway 
workers and workers in the durable goods 
industry as a whole. In our opinion, such 
a comparison is a valid one. The durable 
goods industiy, like the non-operating 
railway industiy, is composed of skilled, 
semi-skilled and unskilled workers. While 
it is undoubtedly true that in some of the 
industries making up the durable goods 
group the proportions of skilled, semi- 
skilled and unskilled workers are different 
from the proportions in the case of the 
non-operating railway group, nevertheless, 
when the comparison is with the durable 
goods group as a whole, the proportions 
on balance do not appear to be greatly 
different. For this reason the inclusion of 
the industries objected to as above would 
appear valid. Furthermore, wood products 
and non-metallic minerals — more especially 
wood products — have the added advantage 
of wide geographic distribution not shared 
to the same extent by the other indus- 
tries in the durable goods group. No other 
group of workers in the Canadian economy 
furnishes, in the opinion of the Board, a 
comparison which answers all the require- 
ments as well as the durable goods 
industry. It may be observed that a 
Presidential board in the United States in 
1948 also considered the comparison of 
durable goods to non-operating railway 
employees a proper one. 

It is not without interest to observe the 
relation which has obtained in the United 
States in recent years between average 
hourly earnings in the durable goods indus- 
try and in the case of the non-operating 
railway employees, as well as with that 
prevailing in the manufacturing industry 
as a whole. 



66 



The follow-ins 



the figures from 1946 to July 1952:— 



TRENDS IN AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS OF NON-OPERATING RAILWAY EMPLOYEES AND 
EMPLOYEES IN DURABLE GOODS AND ALL MANUFACTURING IN THE UNITED STATFS 

1946 TO 1952 



Non-operatinc employees. 

Durable Goods 

All Manufacturing 



1946 



l,037t 
1-156 
1081} 



1947 



1-100 
1-292 
1-237 



1948 



1-224 
1-410 
1-350 



1949 



1-50U 

1 • 469 
1-401 



1-511 
1-537 
1-465 



1 • 683 
1-678 
1-594 



1747 

1-734° 
1-649° 



*Julyl952. 

tThe non-operating employees in the United States went on a 40-hour week effective September 1, 1949. Non- 
operating employees used in the table cover 73 classes. 

{September 1949. 

"Preliminary. 

SovncE-.Report to the President by Emergency Board, appointed February 24, 1950, pursuant to sec. 10 of Railway 
Labor Act. No. 81, table 2, p. 35; 

Hours and Earnings, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington and current data received from Railroad and Airline 
Wage Board, Washington. 



From a somewhat inferior position in 
1946, the non-operating railway worker in 
the United States has since attained parity 
with the worker in the durable goods 
industry. This fact would seem to be 
additional evidence that the comparison we 
propose to make in the present instance 
is not an unreasonable one. 

On September 1, 1950. the average hourly 
earnings of the durable goods worker were 
112-9 cents, the average hours worked per 
week were 41-5, and the average weekly 
earnings $46.85. On the same date the 



average hourly rate of the non-operating 
railway employee was 108-9 cents, the 
average hours ♦worked 47-1 per week, and 
the average weekly earnings $51.29. On 
June 1, 1951, on which date the standard 
work week of the railway worker was 
reduced to 40 hours, the average hourly 
earnings of the durable goods worker had 
risen to 123-8 cents, w'hile average weekly 
earnings were $52.12, average hours worked 
being 42-1. By August 1, 1952, the situa- 
tion had become: — 



— 


Average 

Hourly 

Rate 


Average 
Weekly 
Hours 
Worked 


Average 
Weekly 
Earnings 




139-4 
130 


41-2 
41 


$ 57.43 




54.30 







The railway rate had, accordingly, by that 
date, fallen below the durable goods rate 
by 9-4 cents, but the offer of the railways 
, of an increase of 7 per cent, which is 
equivalent of 9 cents per hour, would have 
equalized matters. 

We think there is another element, 
however, which properly calls for con- 
sideration at this point. The railways 
placed in evidence a chart showing, on a 
quarterly basis, the. average hourly earn- 
ings in durable goods since February 1945. 
as well as the average hourly earnings of the 
non-operating railway employees between 
major wage changes over the same period. 
In the railways' brief, in reference to this 
chart, the following paragraphs appear: — 
120. It will be observed that prior to 
June 1, 1946. railway employees and 
Durable Goods Manufacturing were at 
approximately the same level. The effect 
of the wage increase of 10 cents per hour 
granted railway employees from June 1, 
1946, was to push their wage rates sub- 
stantially above Durable Goods. They 



were, however, overtaken during 1947 
after wages had been freed of all con- 
trols. The increase of 17 cents per hour 
effective March 1, 1948, again established 
railway earnings above Durable Goods, 
but the subsequent rise in the latter 
eliminated this advantage. The increase 
of 7 cents per hour effective August 31, 

1950, did not quite bring railway earn- 
ings up to Durable Goods, but the 
conversion to the 40-hour week June 1. 

1951, pushed them above the level then 
current. 

121. At the present time average 
hourly earnings of railway employees of 
$1.30 per hour compare with average 
hourly earnings for Durable Goods of 
$1-396 at June 1, 1952. The offer made 
by the railways of an increase of 7 per 
cent, which would average just over 9 
cents per hour, was based largely on a 
comparison with the last figure then 
available for Durable Goods of $1-396 
as at April 1, 1952. The effect of this 
offer would have been to bring hourly 



67 



earnings of non-operating employees prac- 
tically in line with those of Durable 
Goods. 

Since June 1, the figures in the durable 
goods industry have been as follows: — 

Cents 
Hours per Hour 

July 41-4 138-3 

August 41-2 139-4 

September 41-8 141-1 

Since 1950, the upward movement in the 
durable goods industry has been at a fairly 
rapid rate. In December of that year, 
average hourly earnings were 116-4 cents. 
A year later the figure had become 134-6 
cents. While in 1952, although the rate 
of increase declined, the trend continued 
upward from 136-4 cents in January to 
141-1 cents in September. Further, there 
have been, during the past summer, a 
number of wage adjustments effected in 
substantial segments of the durable goods 
industry, and some of these have con- 
tained retroactive clauses. The effect of 
these agreements has not been, as yet, 
fully reflected in the published figures. For 
this reason, as well as for the reason that 
there will doubtless be further bargaining 
in the industry during the period to be 
covered by the railway contracts, we think 
it likely that further upward revision of 
the monthly figures may occur. There is 
the further known fact that in some of 
the wage settlements made this year pro- 
vision has been made for deferred increases 
to become operative later this year and in 
1953. 

In view of the manner in which the 
paths of earnings in the durable goods 
industry and in that of the non-operating 
railway employees have, as the railways' 
chart shows, crossed and re-crossed in the 
past, and the likelihood of some con- 
tinued upward movement in the former, 
we think it reasonable, in setting the 
increase for the non-operating railway 
employees with reference to the standard 
afforded by the durable goods industrj^, to 
give effect to the considerations just 
reviewed in order that earnings in the 
railway industry may be kept in touch 
with earnings in durable goods. 

With these matters in mind and having 
regard to the increase required to maintain 
real wages since September 1, 1950, we 
think that an increase on the basis of 
sixteen cents per hour (leaving to one side 
for the moment the question as to a 
percentage or straight cents per hour 



increase "across the board") would be fair 
and reasonable for the purposes of the 
contracts now to be renewed. We think 
that this gives fullest effect to all the 
factors upon which the claim for increase 
has been or can be reasonably based. In 
using, as we have done, the durable goods 
industr3 7 as a basis of comparison, fullest 
effect will also be given to the unions' 
claim for "improvement". The proposed 
increase will, of course, for the present at 
least, place the railway worker in a more 
favourable position than the durable goods 
worker, but our proposal anticipates that 
the margin between the two will again 
close. 

At first sight, the question might arise 
as to why the principle we have applied 
in assessing the increase required to main- 
tain, as at September 1, 1952, the wage 
rate level established on September 1, 1950, 
in terms of constant dollars, should not 
also be applied in assessing the amount 
required to maintain the relationship 
between railway earnings and durable goods 
earnings over the same- period. In other 
words, it might be suggested that if the 
percentage increase in the consumers' price 
index is to be applied to the railway rate 
established on September 1, 1950, to deter- 
mine the rate which should obtain two 
years later, should not the percentage in- 
crease in the durable goods rate in the 
same period be applied to the 1950 railway 
rate to produce the proper 1952 rate. 

The answer, in our opinion, is that 
employment of the consumers' price index 
is for the purpose of maintaining the level 
of wages throughout the period in terms 
of constant dollars, while the use of the 
standard afforded by earnings in the durable 
goods industry is for the purpose of main- 
taining railway wages, as nearly as may 
be, at the same level as earnings in durable 
goods, but the employment of that 
standard is not to maintain whatever 
accidental difference between the two may 
exist on any particular date, whether such 
difference should be in favour of the one 
or the other. 

The employees have pointed out that 
the figures with respect to the durable 
goods worker do not include the value 
of such items as group insurance, sickness 
and accident insurance, hospital and 
medical aid, holidays with pay, and 
pensions, which obtain in the case of many 
industrial employees, and that is so. The 
railways also have, and have had for many 
years, pension plans, vacations with pay, 
and, something which is unique in the case 
of the railways, pass privileges in favour 



68 



of employees and their families. The rail- 
ways do not have, however, the other 
benefits mentioned above. From this fact, 
the argument on the part of the employees 
is that there should be a corresponding 
increase in the wage scale of the railway 
employee to compensate for items lacking. 
In our opinion, however, the matter can- 
not be so dealt with. We think the only 
proper way is that benefits such as are 
above mentioned should be negotiated as 
such, and not included in the wage rate 
itself. As there has been no claim for 
any of these benefits as such, it is not 
possible to deal with the matter on the 
basis put forth. 

Percentage vs. Cents per Hour 

The present demand by the unions has 
been for an increase in the form of an 
equal amount in cents per hour to every 
employee. This is rested by them upon 
the nature of the basic wage structure and 
the interrelationship of the various rates 
of which it is composed. They contend 
that as a result of the unemployment 
which prevailed in 1939, the unskilled 
worker then had to accept a wage which 
was not related to the real value of his 
service. It is said that with the passing 
away of unemployment and the growth of 
competition in the labour market, the 
tendency was to reduce or eliminate what 
the unions regard as excessive wage differ- 
entials which had developed in less pros- 
perous times. They point out that had all 
increases in the past been by way of 
percentage rather than by way of straight 
increases in cents per hour "across the 
board," the effect would have been to 
increase enormously the differentials estab- 
lished in slack times. Accordingly, they 
'ask that any increase at the present time 
should again take the form of an equal 
amount in cents per hour to all workers. 

The railways do not contend that all 
increases should invariably be on a per- 
centage basis. They do say that, while all 
increases since 1939 have been on a cents 
per hour basis, at the present time it is 
important that in any increase to be 
granted that practice should not be 
continued. 

The railways point out that during the 
late war, a cost-of-living bonus was insti- 
tuted based on a weekly amount designed 
to protect the basic living standards of 
wage earners receiving not more than 50 
cents per hour in 1939, it being considered 
that those receiving in excess of that 
amount could fairly be required to absorb 
some of the increase in living costs in a 



time of national emergency. Following the 
war, the National War Labour Board con- 
tinued to authorize increases of a uniform 
amount per hour, a policy designed to 
protect basic living standards and at the 
same time to require those receiving more 
than the basic wage to absorb some portion 
of the increasing costs, thus limiting the 
inflationary effects involved in the war 
effort. 

In the contention of the railways, this 
policy was governed by short-term condi- 
tions arising out of the war and the effects 
of the war, and they point to the resulting 
effects upon wage relationships as between 
various classifications of railway employees. 
For example, in 1939 a machinist's helper 
received 70-9 per cent of the rate payable 
to a fully-qualified machinist, whereas in 
1952 this rate had advanced to 82 per cent. 
Again, an unclassified labourer in 1939 
received 50-6 per cent of the machinist's 
rate, but in 1952 70-3 per cent, while the 
minimum clerical rate in 1939 was 54-4 
per cent of the machinist's rate and in 
1952 72-3 per cent. The result was that 
while the machinist's rate over the period 
increased by 94 per cent, a number of 
other rates increased all the way from 
113-4 per cent to 244-9 per cent. 

The railways have submitted evidence 
to show that up to the present time the 
effect of the uniform increases in cents 
per hour has not been to throw rates of 
pay of certain individual categories in rail- 
way service seriously out of line with rates 
payable in outside industry, but that a 
situation has now been reached where the 
rates paid to the skilled employee in 
relation to those paid to the less skilled 
are beginning to render the former 
unattractive and not worth the effort 
involved in qualifying for the higher rate. 
In the brief filed by the employees, the 
paragraph already referred to, in which 
reference is made to the fact that railway 
service is a lifetime career, contains this 
further statement: — 

It is therefore most important that the 
financial prospects should be attractive, 
both for the entrant and for those 
already in the industry. At present, 
however, new skilled labourers are not 
attracted to the industry. 

It is true that this paragraph relates to 
the employees' contention that all railway 
wages are low when compared with that 
which ought to prevail, but the statement 
quoted agrees significantly with the situa- 
tion as seen by the railways and rather 



69 



points to a conclusion that the differ- 
entials between skilled and unskilled rates 
ought not, at present at least, to be further 
narrowed. 

These considerations and the fact that 
real wages have been impaired by 11-3 
per cent since September 1950, would 
justify making the entire increase we pro- 
pose in the form of a percentage, but we 
think that the change from the practice of 
former years might well not be made in one 
step. We therefore recommend that 
existing rates be increased by 7 per cent 
plus seven cents (the equivalent of 16-05 
cents). 

Escalator Clause 

The demand for the inclusion of an 
"escalator" or cost-of-living clause in the 
new agreement has for its background the 
history of a climbing cost-of-living index 
since 1939 and its effect upon each wage 
increase almost immediately after the 
same had been negotiated. The employees 
refer also to the fact of the inclusion of 
such a provision in wage agreements in 
outside industry in Canada in the past few 
years. In particular, they refer to what 
might be called a sample of such agree- 
ments received by the Department of 
Labour during the first eight months of 
1951. Approximately one-fifth in number 
of these agreements covering 40 per cent 
of the 374,000 workers involved included 
some such clause. The employees also 
point to the fact that as of March 1, 
1951, a clause of this character has been 
included in the agreements reached by the 
eastern railroads in the United States, 
which railroads include the American 
branches of the Canadian National and 
Canadian Pacific Railways. 

While it is true that the cost-of-living 
index in Canada advanced from January 
1939 to January 1952 to a level of 191-5 
points, since the last mentioned date, 
however, the index has fallen to 186-5 on 
September 1, 1952, and to 185 on October 1. 
The corresponding figure for the consumers' 
price index is 116. As to the agreement 
made by the American railroads in 1951. 
it is to be observed that the term of 
that agreement was from March 1, 1951, 
to October 1. 1955, while the agreements 
here under consideration are for one year 
only, of which something less than 10 
months is at this date left to run. It 
would seem, therefore, that a clause of 
this character is inappropriate in a short- 
term agreement at such a time as the 
present when the trend of living is down- 
wains. 



Union Shop and Check-off 

In connection with this demand, the 
employees point out that in 1952 the 
Carriers Conference of the eastern United 
States railways concluded an agreement 
with fifteen of the seventeen unions who 
are before this Board, providing for a 
form of union shop and check-off of union 
dues, and that the Canadian National and 
Canadian Pacific Railways are parties to 
this agreement with respect to their branch 
lines in the eastern United States. It 
appears that the railroads in other parts 
of the United States have not as yet such 
a provision in their agreements with their 
employees. 

The employees here concerned also point 
to the provisions of Section 10 of the 
Industrial Relations and Disputes Investi- 
gation Act, under which the certified 
bargaining agent bargains collectively on 
behalf of all the employees, and that thus 
the working conditions of non-union as 
well as union members are affected by 
the agreements so brought about. The 
unions complain that employees who do not 
become union members, in effect, take the 
benefits flowing from the collective bar- 
gaining conducted by the unions, without 
sharing the cost, and that the only source 
of funds with which the unions may carry 
on these activities is membership dues. 

With respect to the check-off, the unions 
point out that the railways already deduct 
a large number of items from each indi- 
vidual pay-cheque covering a variety of 
matters, and that, therefore, the deduction 
of union dues should not be a matter which 
can be reasonably objected to. They point 
also to a trend in industry toward some 
form of union shop and check-off, and 
indeed the railways admit that there is a 
trend in that direction. The unions also 
contend that under Section 6 (1) of the 
statute already referred to, Parliament has 
authorized the inclusion in collective agree- 
ments of a union shop clause. It is con- 
tended that this section expresses public 
policy on the matter and that a board 
such as this Board ought not to do other- 
wise than report in favour of this demand. 

In answer to these contentions the rail- 
ways refer to the fact that under the union 
shop provision here in question, willingness 
on the part of an applicant for employment 
with the railways to become a member of 
one of the unions here concerned would 
become a prerequisite to employment, and 
refusal to join would automatically involve 
discharge, regardless of the length of 
service or the fitness of the employee to 
perform the duties of his emplo3 r ment. It 



"0 



should perhaps be said that the unions' 
proposal is not merely to affect employees 
hereafter entering the railways' employ, but 
all exist in"' employees as well. 

The railways say that under existing 
agreements with the unions, the latter have 
the right to make a grievance of the 
discharge by the railways of any employee, 
which grievance then becomes the subject 
of review under the appropriate machinery 
provided by the collective agreements. 
Under a union shop clause, however, the 
discharge of an employee, once he has 
been deprived of his membership under 
the provisions provided by the constitu- 
tion of the unions themselves, is automati- 
cally required of the railways without any 
light of review in which the railways have 
any part. Thus there is a lack of mutuality 
in the two provisions. 

The railways also contend that from the 
standpoint of the employee, the latter, 
under a union shop agreement, would lose 
his present right of protest by resigning 
from the union in the event of disagree- 
ment on his part with the policy adopted 
by the majority on am r question, as 
resignation from the union would involve 
discharge from his employment. 

The railways emphasize the loss of 
freedom of the person and the substitution 
of compulsion which would be involved in 
acceptance on their part of the union shop, 
and they are unwilling, not only from their 
own standpoint but as well from that of 
their employees, to agree to such a pro- 
vision. The railways agree that, in the 
interests of good labour relations, unionism 
among their employees should be strong 
and stable, but in their view, unions remain 
Thus by so acting that the employees will 
become and will remain members of the 
'union as a result of a conviction that their 
interests are being served by membership 
in a union, and that the union itself will 
be a better instrument of service to the 
employee if it has to depend upon 
demonstrating its service rather than upon 
compulsion. The railways contend that 
the existence of the so-called "free-rider"' 
is a lesser evil than the loss of personal 
freedom which would inevitably follow 
adoption of the union ship. They cite 
specific instances of long term employees, 
who declined for reasons of their own to 
become union members, who had to be 
discharged for that reason, upon the 
institution in other industries of the union 
shop. 

Like the unions, the railways point to 
the Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act, but draw a different 



conclusion as to the public policy therein 
laid down. They point to Section 3 which 
preserves to every employee the right to 
membership in any trade union, and to 
Section 4 (2) (b) under which the employer 
is prohibited from imposing any condition 
in a contract of employment which seeks 
to restrain an employee from exercising 
his rights under the statute. They accord- 
ingly contend that as Section 6 (1) oper- 
ates only with the consent of the employer, 
in the absence of such consent, the policy 
of the statute is to leave the employer 
complete freedom of choice in the matter. 
If our appreciation of the fundamental 
basis of the desire for the union shop be 
correct, it is the sense of injury cherished 
by the union member toward those who 
stand outside the membership but who, 
nonetheless, along with the union mem- 
ber, reap the benefits unavoidably accruing 
to all employees from the activities of the 
union, without in any way contributing to 
the expense involved in the maintenance 
of the union. Such a sentiment is natural 
and understandable. At the same time we 
find it difficult to believe that of the 
143,000 non-operating railway employees, 
some 10,000 to 15,000 are . actuated by no 
other motive in refraining from becoming 
union members than a desire to profit 
from the work of others without cost to 
themselves. So far as the evidence goes, 
it rather indicates that refusal to join may 
stem from a variety of motives. 

To give effect to the union proposal 
would be to substitute compulsion for 
effectiveness in the interests of the 
employees as a basis for attracting mem- 
bers. So far as we know, the only 
organizations in our democratic society in 
which membership has been made a con- 
dition of the right to work, are those with 
respect to which the legislature has by 
statute so stipulated, in the public interest 
and for its protection against loss or injury 
which might otherwise be occasioned by 
incompetence. Examples are afforded in 
the case of the various professions. The 
statute which is here in question, namely, 
the Industrial Disputes Investigation Act, 
does not so provide. Employees are left 
free by the statute to join one or more 
unions as they see fit, or not to join any 
union, save that the employer "may" agree 
to a term in a collective agreement 
"requiring as a condition of employment 
membership in a specified trade union or 
granting a preference of employment to 
members of a specified trade union"; 
Section 6 (1). The statute, however, 
carries the matter no further. If the 



71 



employer does not see fit to agree to such 
a term, the statute imposes no compulsion 
to that end upon either him or his 
employees. Therefore, for a board of the 
character of this Board to say that the 
employer ought to agree to such a term 
would be to go further than the legislature 
itself has seen fit to go. Such a statement 
by the Board would undoubtedly involve 
a finding in the present case that the 
grounds upon which the attitude of the 
railways is based are entirely inadequate 
and unreasonable, a finding we do not 
think we could make. However that may 
be, we think that the statute, properly 
understood, precludes, in the circumstances 
of the present case, a clause of the 
character here under consideration. The 
following sections are relevant: — 

3. (1) Every employee has the right to 
be a member of a trade union and to 
participate in the activities thereof. 

4. (2) No employer, and no person 
acting on behalf of an employer, shall 

(a) refuse to employ or to continue 
to employ any person, or otherwise 
discriminate against any person in 
regard to employment or any 
term or condition of employment 
because the person is a member of 
a trade union; or 

(b) impose any condition in a contract 
of employment seeking to restrain 
an employee from exercising his 
rights under this Act. . . . 

6. (1) Nothing in this Act prohibits 
the parties to a collective agreement from 
inserting in the collective agreement a 
provision requiring, as a condition of 
employment, membership in a specified 
trade union, or granting a preference of 
employment to members of a specified 
trade union. 

(2) No provision in a collective agree- 
ment requiring an employer to discharge 
an employee because such an employee 
is or continues to be a member of, or 
engage in activities on behalf of a union 
other than a specified trade union, shall 
be valid. 

The respective constitutions of a number 
at least of the unions here in question 
provide that no member may hold mem- 
bership in any other railway labour 
organization admitting to membership the 
same classes of employees, or any other 
organization or alliance that is dual to any 
of the purposes of the union. 



The proposed union shop clause, so far 
as relevant, is as follows: — 

All employees now or hereafter 
employed in any work covered by the 
rules and working conditions agreement 
between the parties hereto shall, as a 
condition of continued employment in 
such work . . . become members of, and 
thereafter maintain membership in good 
standing in, the organization party to 
this agreement, 

with the following proviso, which has two 
branches, namely, 

That such condition shall not apply 
with respect to 

(a) any employee to whom such 
membership is not available upon 
the same terms and conditions as 
are generally applicable to any 
other member; 

(b) any employee to whom member- 
ship was denied or terminated for 
any reason other than failure of 
the employee to tender the 
periodic dues, initiation fees and 
assessments (not including fines 
and penalties) uniformly required 
as the condition of acquiring or 
maintaining membership. 

The insertion of this clause in a collec- 
tive agreement between the railways and 
the unions obligates the railways (1) to 
require from their employees their agree- 
ment to join a particular union, an 
agreement which, by virtue of the provi- 
sion in the union constitution already 
referred to, involves an undertaking not 
to join any other union, and (2) to dis- 
charge them if they refuse. This is the 
very thing which the statute, by Section 
6 (2), prohibits. 

To require each employee to join such 
a union calls for an offer on his part to 
become a member on the basis of the 
union constitution, which becomes a funda- 
mental part of the contract of member- 
ship. It is obvious that there can be no 
reason for "denial" of any such application 
when accompanied by the required dues, 
and that therefore any suggestion that the 
situation is saved by the existence of the 
second branch of the proviso to the pro- 
posed clause is groundless. It is out of 
the question for an employee to offer to 
join such a union and at the same time 
to stipulate that, contrary to the constitu- 
tion, he shall have the right to remain or 
become at any time during his membership 
a member of some other union. That 
would not be an offer to join that union 
at all. If such a thing were possible, an 



72 



employee could propose membership con- 
taining any reservation he saw fit, and thus 
avoid the penalty of discharge by going 
through the form of offering to join on 
his own terms. There can be no member- 
ship but membership upon the one foot- 
ing, namely, that provided for by the 
constitution. Accordingly, in our view, the 
proposed clause, being contrary to the 
express terms of subsection (2) of Section 
6, is invalid and one which the railways 
are precluded by the statute from entering 
into. Writing the proposed clause into the 
collective agreement automatically writes 
into it the union constitution. Any 
suggestion, therefore, that the latter may 
be "severed" from the former is, in our 
view, out of the question. 

We therefore think that the statute 
precludes a clause of the nature of that 
here proposed in any collective agreement 
with a union the constitution of which 
contains a provision of the character under 
discussion. 

Check-off 

With regard to the check-off, the Board 
is of opinion that, as every employee now 
has the same right as any other creditor 
to assign the whole or any part of any 
debt, present or future owing to him, the 
proposed clause is one that should prop- 
erly form part of the new agreements. 

Emergency Clause 

This clause owes its inception to the 
suggestion of a government official prior to 
the settlement of 1950. The suggestion 
arose out of the world situation which then 
existed. The Board does not think that 
sufficient reason now exists for the con- 
tinuance of this clause. 

'Contract Term 

Should it be open to us, upon the terms 
of reference, we would recommend that the 
term of the new contracts should run from 
the date of ultimate agreement between 
the parties, in view of the fact that less 
than ten months now remains of the new 
contract term. 

Negotiations for Settlement 

In addition to the other duties which 
the statute imposes upon a board of this 
character, it is provided by Section 32 (1) 
that 

A conciliation board shall, immediately 
after appointment of the chairman 
thereof, endeavour to bring about agree- 
ment between the parties in relation to 
the matters referred to it. 

During the hearings at Montreal, the 
Board suggested to the parties before it 



that each should appoint a small group, 
the railway group to meet with the 
chairman of the Board and the nominee 
of the railways on the Board, and the 
union group to meet with the chairman 
and the nominee of the unions on the 
Board. It was thought that, under such 
an arrangement, in the initial stages at 
least, the parties would feel more free to 
discuss possible terms of settlement. Two 
meetings with each of these groups were 
accordingly held, at the first of which in 
each case the Board members present 
explained that it was the desire of the 
Board to carry out the obligation placed 
upon it in this regard by the statute, and 
to do so in any way possible. It was 
suggested to each of the small groups 
representing the respective parties that 
they should obtain instructions from their 
principals as to how far each was prepared 
to go toward settlement, and that at a 
later meeting in each case the Board 
members should be informed so that the 
area in dispute might be surveyed and, 
if possible, a basis of settlement reached. 

At the second meeting with the railway 
group, the Board members were apprised 
that the railways would not stand on their 
7 per cent offer if the unions were pre- 
pared to negotiate within some area which 
would take into account the amount 
required to bring the date settled in 1950 
in line with the rise in the cost of living 
since that time, and having regard also 
to the current rate in the durable goods 
industry. The Board members meeting 
with the employee group on the second 
occasion were advised by that group, how- 
ever, that they had no suggestion to make. 

Accordingly, the matter of a possible 
settlement had to be left in this position. 

Dated this 21st day of November, 1952. 
Respectfully submitted. 

(Sgd.) R. L. Kellock. 
(Sgd.) Paul S. Smith. 

To the Hon. Milton F. Gregg, V.C., 
Minister of Labour, 
Ottawa, Ontario. 

Appendix 1. 

Employee Organizations 

represented before 

Railway Conciliation Board 

1952 

International Association of Machinists 
Order of Railroad Telegraphers 
Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way 

Employees 
Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship 

Clerks, Freight Handlers, etc. 



73 



International Brotherhood of Firemen 

and Oilers, etc. 
International Brotherhood of Electrical 

Workers 
Commercial Telegraphers' Union 
Brotherhood of Railway Signalmen 
Canadian Brotherhood of Railway 

Emploj'ees and Other Transport 

Workers 
Brotherhood of Express Employees 
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. 

Train Chair Car, Coach Porters and 

Attendants 
International Brotherhood of Black- 
smiths, Drop Forgers and Helpers 
International Brotherhood of Boiler- 
makers, Iron Ship Builders and 

Helpers 
United Association of Journejanen and 

Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe 

Fitting Industry 
International Moulders and Foundry 

Workers Union 
Brotherhood of Railway Carmen 
Sheet Metal Workers International 

Association 
Division No. 4, Railway Employees 

Department, American Federation of 

Labour 

Appendix 2. 

Railways represented before 
Railway Conciliation Board 
1952 
Canadian National Railways 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company 
Ontario Northland Railway 
Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway 
Company 

Minority Report of Board Member 
David Lewis 

To the Hon. Milton F. Gregg, V.C., 
Minister of Labour, 
Ottawa, Ontario. 

Sir: 

With great regret, I do not find it 
possible to agree with the recommendations 
made in this case by my colleagues. My 
regret is the greater because I fully appre- 
ciate the importance of finding a basis for 
settling the dispute. 

The increase in wages which my 
colleagues recommend is, in my respectful 
view, substantially lower than is justified 
by all the facts and circumstances of this 
case. The majority recommendation of 16 
ronts per hour is only 1 cent more than 
the increase demanded by the rise in the 
cost of living, calculated on the basis of 
the new Consumers' Price Index. It is un- 



considered conviction that a recommenda- 
tion which gives the employees concerned 
in these proceedings only one cent more 
than the adjustment necessary to make 
up their loss consequent upon the increase 
in their cost of living, fails to take into 
account the many other, and equally 
important, factors which should govern this 
case. 

Similarly, I cannot find any justification 
for refusing to recommend an adequate 
form of union security to the unions here 
involved, at a time when the trend 
toward increasing union security in all 
industry is striking and unmistakable. The 
history of the railway unions, dating back 
half a century, is one of consistent respon- 
sibility. To deny such labour organizations 
a measure of union security which has in 
fact been granted to numerous trade unions 
in other fields is, in my respectful sub- 
mission, unjustified and unjustifiable. It is 
all the more so when both the Canadian 
National and the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
ways are parties to collective agreements 
in the United States which grant to their 
employees across the line precisely the 
union security provisions which the unions 
here requested for their Canadian members. 

Wages 

Myths die hard. The myth that railway 
workers are particularly highly paid is no 
exception. I have no doubt that it is a 
myth and a false one. The evidence placed 
before the board proved to my satisfaction 
i hat. as far as the 143.000 and more 
employees involved in these proceedings 
are concerned, they are behind rather than 
ahead of their fellow-workers in other basic 
industries. 

The Railways informed the Board that 
the average hour'y earnings for these 
employees is SI. 20 per hour. It is to be 
noted that those are their average earn- 
ings. The unions informed us that in the 
basic steel industry the labour rate is 
$1.43J per hour; the middle rates ranging 
from SI. 71 to $1.76 per hour. In the case 
of Massey Harris, the base labour rate is 
SI. 37 per hour and the average earnings 
are SI. 71 per hour. Consolidated Mining 
and Smelting, owned by the CPR, pays 
the common labourer a rate of $1.48 and 
the average for its employees is $1.66. The 
base rate for employees of the Toronto 
Transportation Commission is $1.51. 

I have no doubt that these examples 
could be multiplied many times. It is a 
fact that in the organized sectors of basic 
and important industry in Canada, the 
lowest labour rates are higher, and in some 
cases substantially higher, than the average 



74 



I 



earnings of the railways employees here 
concerned. This, in my view, is the key 
to a proper analysis and understanding of 
the issues involved in these proceedings. 

Furthermore, the non-operating railway 
employees have lagged behind in other 
respects. They won the forty-hour week 
only in June, 1951, and that after a strike. 
Moreover — and this was shocking news to 
me — they enjoy only two of the accepted 
fringe benefits in industry. They get 
annual vacations with pay of one week up 
to one year, 7 days up to three years and 
two weeks after 5 years of service. And 
the railways have a contributory pension 
plan. 

However, the emplo3*ees do not have any 
paid statutory holidays. Only if they work 
on such holidays do they get paid, although 
at the rate of time and a half. There are 
no shift premiums. Perhaps most important 
of all, there is no health and welfare insur- 
ance plan for them, not even a con- 
tributory one. 

The railways made a great deal of the 
free transportation privilege which is 
accorded to their emplo3^ees. I should not 
wish to belittle this benefit; it is certainly 
of value to empkrvees who have occasion 
to travel. However, there are three com- 
ments that ma} r fairly be made. 

First, the rules governing the free 
transportation privilege to employees pro- 
vide safeguards against the use of this 
privilege interfering with revenue-producing 
traffic. 

Secondly, and for this reason, the benefit 
docs not cost the railways anything. 

Thirdly, this form of benefit is common 
in most other industry. Employees of 
large retail establishments and in con- 
sumer goods industries commonly receive 
reductions for purchases made by them 
from their employers 

The conclusion is therefore inescapable, 
to my mind, that the free transportation 
privilege does not set the railways apart 
from other industry and is not a cost to 
them. It is therefore not the kind of 
benefit which may fairly be considered in a 
discussion of fringe benefits generally. 

As far as the annual vacations are 
concerned, the scheme of the railways is 
certainly not at the top of the list. It is 
true that slightly more than one-half of 
the durable goods workers receive two 
weeks after five years. It is, however, also 
true that about a third of the employees 
in the group enjoy two weeks' vacation 
after one, two or three years of service, 
instead of five. And it is also true that 
a growing portion of Canadian industry 



provides vacations of three weeks after 
fifteen, twenty or twenty-five years of 
service, while there is no three-week vaca- 
tion for any of the non-operating employees. 
It is, therefore, clear that the vacation 
plan of the railways is, at best, no more 
than the average in Canadian industry and 
is certainly not an advanced plan. 

Paid statutory holidays are standard in 
present-day collective agreements. Thus 
some 73 per cent of the employees in the 
durable goods industries covered in a 
survey made by the Department of Labour 
as at October 1951, were paid for six, seven, 
eight and nine statutory holidays, although 
not worked. 

Only 13 per cent of the employees in 
this group did not enjoy this benefit, the 
remaining 14 per cent received from one to 
five paid holidays. In the same group of 
industries, and on the same date, over 85 
per cent of the employees had some form 
of health and welfare insurance plan. 

The above simple facts should once and 
for all lay the myth that the railways 
employees are in the vanguard with regard 
to wages and the like. They may have 
been at one time, they are no longer ahead 
of other basic industry. On the contrary, 
they have begun to lag behind, clearly and 
shockingly. 

For this trend I can find no justifica- 
tion, and I believe it to be the nation's 
duty to halt it. The railways comprise one 
of the most essential industries of the 
country. One of the two major systems 
is owned by the Canadian people; the 
other came into existence as a result of 
huge monetary and land grants by the 
nation. One frequently hears a remark 
which is as amusing as it is revealing. It 
is said that the Canadian people own the 
CNR but have not paid for it; but that 
the3 r have paid for the CPR and do not 
own it. Historically, this is not too 
exaggerated a description. 

Railway employment requires skill and a 
great sense of responsibility. The hours 
of work must be adjusted to the demands 
of freight and passenger traffic, and to the 
inconvenience of employees. Many of the 
workers concerned here have to meet the 
public, whether in the station, the ticket 
office, the express office, the dining car or 
the sleeping car. 

Certainly there are compensations. 
Employment on the railways has more 
security, although during the thirties rail- 
way workers suffered lay-offs and wage cuts 
like their brothers. A job on the railways 
also has an honourable status in the labour 
force of the country. But these are reason- 



To 



for more, not less consideration. It is not 
the custom in our civilization to pay less 
for higher regarded labour. 

In view of all the above factors, it is 
impossible to justify the levelling down 
process which has latterly characterized the 
wages of non-operating railway employees. 
This is the more reprehensible since the 
Canadian people have a direct interest in 
and control over the railway industry, and 
the unions before us have enjoyed a half- 
century of collective bargaining. 

One of the grounds on which the 
Unions based their demand for a 45 cent 
hourly increase was to achieve parity with 
wages of similar groups on the United 
States Railways. Both sides of the dispute 
spent a great deal of time analysing the 
relevant considerations. The Railways 
presented many arguments in opposition to 
the request for parity which have been 
adequately summarized in the Majority 
Report. 

It is worth noting, in passing, that the 
Railways have set six and one-half per 
cent as an objective for the return on their 
net investment. Their sole justification for 
this rate of return for Canadian Railways 
is that a similar rate has been set for 
American Railways by the United States 
Interstate Commerce Commission. The 
Unions are, in my view, justified in chiding 
the Railways about their double standard 
in this respect. If the Railways' submis- 
sions are valid, that the differences in the 
two economies do not justify parity of 
wages, then surely it follows that these 
same differences cannot justify parity in 
return to capital. If, on the other hand, 



the Railways feel they are right in asking 
the same rate of return in spite of the 
differences, then they cannot successfully 
oppose the employees' request for the same 
wages. I appreciate that this does not 
meet the merits of the problem, but it 
does puncture the air of righteousness with 
which the railways rejected the employees' 
demands. 

However, a study of the growth of the 
economies in the United States and Canada 
since the end of the last war reveals strik- 
ing and conclusive facts which fully justify 
the unions' protest against the size of the 
disparity between railway wages in the 
two countries. 

It is undoubtedly true that the per 
capita wealth in Canada is considerably 
lower than the per capita wealth in the 
United States. It is also true that by and 
large Canadian wages and salaries, as well 
as other income, tend to be lower than in 
the United States. These are some of the 
facts on which the Railways founded their 
attack on the request for parity of wages 
for one group of Canadian workers. 

However, there are other equally relevant 
facts. Some of them are graphically pre- 
sented in the following tables 1 to 10. 
These tables cover, some in total amounts 
and some in per capita calculations, the 
accepted indices for the measurement of 
economic growth of a country. They 
compare the # economic growth in Canada 
and in the United States from 1946 to 1951 
inclusive. They are, in other words, a 
measure of the rate of growth in the two 
countries since the end of the second World 
War. 



1. GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT 1946-51 IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 



Year 


Amount 


Canada 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


Amount 


United States 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


1946 


12,026 
13,768 
15,613 
16,462 
18,122 
21,241 




211,110 
233,264 
259,045 
258,229 
284,187 
329,232 




1947 


14-48 
29-83 
36-89 
50-69 
76-62 


10-48 


1948 


22-70 


1949 


22-32 


1950 


34-63 


1951 


55-95 







2. NET NATIONAL INCOME AT FACTOR COST 1946-1951 IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 



Year 


Amount 


Canada 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


Amount 


United States 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


1946 


9,821 
10,985 
12,560 
13,194 
14,555 
17,229 




180,286 
198,688 
223,469 
216,259 
239,170 
277,554 




1947 


11-85 

27-88 
34-34 
48-20 
75-43 


10-20 


1948 


23-95 


1949 


19-95 


1950 


32-66 


1951 


53-95 



76 



3 GROSS DOMESTIC INVESTMENT 1946-1951 (EXCLUDING BUSINESS INVENTORIES) IN 

MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 



Year 


Amount 


Canada 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


Amount 


United States 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


1946 


1,398 
2,121 
2,685 
2,968 
3,216 
3,807 




22,619 
30,984 
37,664 
35,947 
44,878 
48,179 




1947 


51-71 
91-06 
112-30 
130-04 
172-31 


36-98 


1948 . 


66-51 


1949 


58-94 


1950 . 


98-49 


1951 


113-00 







4. TOTAL SALARIES AND WAGES (EXCLUDING AGRICULTURE) IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 



Year 


Amount 


Canada 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


A mount 


United States 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


1946 


5,025 
5,878 
6,794 
7,359 
7,838 
9,143 




108,548 
120,078 
131.143 
130,316 
142,688 
166,761 




1947... 


16-91 
35-20 

46-45 
55-98 
81-95 


10-62 


1948... 


20-82 


1949.. 


20-05 


1950 


31-45 


1951 


53-63 







5. INDEXES OF INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION 1946-1951 (1935 = 100) 



Year 


Amount 


Canada 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


Amount 


United States 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


1946 


159-2 
175-5 
181-5 
184-3 
198-3 
212-0 




170 

187 
192 
176 
200 
219 




1947 


10-23 
14-01 
15-76 
24-56 
33-16 


10-00 


1948 


12-94 


1949 

1950 


3-53 
17-65 


1951 


28-82 







6. GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT PER MEMBER OF THE LABOUR FORCE 
14 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 



Year 


Amount 


Canada 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


Amount 


United States 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


1946 


2,514 
2,812 
3,152 
3,250 
3,507 
4,061 




3,670 
3,877 
4,216 
4,158 
4,504 
5,236 




1947 


11-85 
25-38 
29-28 
39-49 
61-53 


5-64 


1948 


14-88 


1949 


13-29 


1950 


22-72 


1951 


42-67 







7. NET NATIONAL INCOME PER MEMBER OF THE LABOUR FORCE 
14 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 



Year 


Amount 


Canada 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


Amount 


United States 
Per Cent 
Rise Over 

1946 


1946 


2,053 
2,243 
2,535 
2,605 
2,816 
3,294 


"'9^25*' 
23-47 
26-88 
37-16 
60-44 


3,134 
3,302 
3,800 
3,482 
3,790 
4,414 




1947 


5-36 


1948 


21-25 


1949 


11-10 


1950 

1951 


20-93 
40-84 



77 



GROSS DOMESTIC INVESTMENT PER MEMBER OF THE LABOUR FORCE 
14 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 



Year 


Amount 


Canada 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


Amount 


United States 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


1946 


292 
433 
542 

586 
622 
728 




393 
515 

613 
579 
611 
766 




1947 


48-29 
85-61 
100-68 
113-01 
149-31 


31-04 


1948 


55-98 


1949 


47-33 


1950 . 


80-91 


1951 . 


94-91 







TOTAL NON-AGRICULTURAL WAGES AND SALARIES PER MEMBER OF THE LABOUR FORCE 

14 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 



Year 


Amount 


Canada 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


Amount 


United States 

Per Cent 

Rise Over 

1946 


1946 


1,050 
1,200 
1,371 
1,453 
1,517 
1,748 




1,887 
1,996 
2,134 
2,098 
2,261 
2,652 




1947... 


14-28 
30-57 
38-38 
44-47 
66-47 


5-77 


1948... 


13-08 


1949... 


11-18 


1950 


19-82 


1951 


40-54 







10. GROSS DOMESTIC INVESTMENT AS PERCENTAGE OF GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT 1946-1951 



Year 


Canada 


United States 


1946 


p.c. 
11-6 
15-4 
17-2 
18-0 
17-7 
17-9 


p.c. 
10-7 


1947 .. 


13-3 


1948... 


14-5 


1949 


13-9 


1950 


15-8 


1951... 


14-6 







The relevant columns in the above 
tables are the ones showing the percentage 
increases over 1946. They disclose that on 
every index of economic growth, whether 
in total amounts or in per capita amounts, 
the rate of growth in Canada since the 
end of the second World War has been 
substantially greater than the rate of 
growth in the United States. Furthermore, 
this is true not only for the period as a 
whole, but year by year. In fact, even 
in 1949, the year in which the United 
States suffered a slight recession, the 
Canadian economy continued to show con- 
sistent advance. 

What the above tables clearly show is 
that since the end of the second World 
War, the gap in economic development 
and wealth between Canada and the United 
States has been steadily narrowing. In 
absolute figures Canada is still below the 
United States. In relative terms, however, 
our rate of increase has for the past six 
years been substantially higher. This must 
be a matter of pride for every Canadian. 



But what has happened to the gap 
between Canadian and American Railway 
wages during the same period? Non- 
operating Railway employees in the United 
States received, from 1946 to July 1952, 
increases totalling 67 cenis per hour, plus a 
20 per cent adjustment for reduction of 
the standard work week to 40 hours. On 
the other hand, non-operating Railway 
Employees in Canada received during the 
same period increases totalling 34 cents per 
hour, plus a 20 per cent adjustment for 
reduction of hours. In short, the disparity 
between the wages of the said employees 
in the United States and their counter- 
part in Canada increased by 33 cents from 
1946 to the present. 

Thus, at the same time that the gap 
between the Canadian economy and the 
American economy substantially narrowed, 
the gap between Railway wages in Canada 
and Railway wages in the United States 
widened. This cannot, in my view, be 
justified on any basis. Surely it was to 
be expected that as the disparity between 



78 



the two economies narrowed, the disparity 
in wages of employees would also narrow; 
that at least it would not increase. In 
fact, as has been shown, the disparity in 
railway wages has increased to a shocking 
extent. 

Of particular relevance are Tables 4 and 
9 above. The first gives the totals of 
non-agricultural salaries and wages year by 
year from 1946 to 1951; the second gives 
the per capital non-agricultural salaries and 
wages covering the same period. In both 
tables the rate of increase for Canada is 
strikingly greater than that for the United 
States. When we reach the year 1951, the 
increases over 1946 for Canada are 81-95 
per cent and 66-47 per cent as against 
53-63 per cent and 40-54 respectively for 
the United States. 

What these two tables graphically dis- 
close is that the gap between Canadian 
and American wages as a whole has been 
steadily narrowing at an encouraging and 
significant rate. Railway employees have 
a right to feel resentment and indignation 
that at the same time the disparity in their 
own wages has been as steadily increasing. 

This fact is further illustrated in one of 
the exhibits filed by the Railways. This 
exhibit compares the average hourly earn- 
ings for Canadian and United States 
employees in Steam Railways, manufactur- 
ing as a whole, durable goods as a group, 
and a number of individual industries. It 
also shows the percentage by which 
American wages exceed Canadian in every 
case. 

The striking fact which emerges is that 
the percentage by which Railway wages 
in the United States exceed those in 
Canada is the third highest in the entire 
Exhibit. Only Coal Mining and Leather 
and Leather Products show larger differ- 
ences. American Railway wages are higher 
than Canadian by 45-4 per cent. Wages 
in manufacturing as a whole in the United 
States are higher than in Canada by 28-3 
per cent, and wages in the Durable Goods 
industries show a disparity of only 24-9 
per cent. In other words, the difference 
between American and Canadian Railway 
wages is 17-1 per cent higher than the 
disparity in wages for all manufacturing 
and 20-5 per cent higher than the gap in 
wages for the Durable Goods industries. 

The facts disclosed by the tables and 
exhibits referred to show that Canadian 
wages generally have advanced in some 
relation to the economic growth, particu- 
larly as compared with the rate of progress 
in the country to the south of us. Railway 



employees, however, have not only not 
shared in this advance, but their relative 
position has actually worsened. 

It is impossible to draw any other con- 
clusion from the above facts than that 
Railway wages have not kept pace with 
the advance in the Canadian economy. 
Whatever justification there may be for 
some differential between Canadian and 
American wages, there is no justification 
whatever for the disparity in railway wages 
having grown substantially during a period 
when the disparities in the economy as a 
whole and in wages as a whole were 
decreasing. 

From the incontrovertible facts which 
have been analysed, it is impossible to 
draw any other conclusion than that the 
Unions' demand for parity with American 
wages is fully and thoroughly justified, at 
least to the extent to which the differential 
has grown since the end of the second 
World War, that is to say, to the extent 
of 33 cents per hour. If my final recom- 
mendation is somewhat lower, as it will 
be, it is because I realize that it is not 
possible to apply comparisons of this sort 
or of any other sort mechanically. 

Before dealing with the basis for the 
increase which, in my view, should be 
recommended, it is necessary to comment 
briefly on a few other matters because of 
their importance to any discussion of Rail- 
way wages. 

In their presentation to the Board, the 
Railways did not deny the Union conten- 
tion that there have been increases in 
efficiency and productivity in the railway 
industry, but they did seek to minimize 
their extent. To my mind, there is no 
doubt that there has been a substantial 
increase in productivity and a reduction 
in unit cost in Railway services as in all 
industry. This has, in fact, been admitted 
by Railway spokesmen on other occasions. 

In an address at the Annual Dinner of 
the Canadian Railway Club in Montreal 
delivered on February 1, 1952, Mr. E. A. 
Bromley, Vice-President of the Canadian 
National Railways, stated 

During the past twenty years in fact, 
our efficiency has doubled. ... It is 
true that our efficiency of operation is 
steadily increasing and we are making 
steady progress in the improvement of 
Railway facilities and equipment. 

Giving evidence before the Board of 
Transport Commissioners on September 24, 



79 



1952, Mr. F. V. Stone, head of the Depart- 
ment of Research of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway, stated 

Our rail costs are coming down over 
the long time because there has been an 
increase in the efficiency of Railway 
Transportation. 

It is generally difficult to measure pro- 
ductivity and it would seem to be 
particularly difficult to measure it in the 
case of Railway services. However, there 
was no reason to assume that there had 
not been progress in Railway productivity 
and the above statements of authoritative 
spokesmen for the two Railways fully 
support the contentions of the Unions that 
that increase has been significant and 
substantial. It is surely an established 
principle in Western democracies that the 
employees of industry are entitled to share 
in technological advance. This is another 
reason why I cannot conscientiously agree 
with a recommendation which provides 
only one cent above the amount required 
by the rise in the cost of living. 

The Railways also, and quite properly 
from their point of view, emphasized the 
growing competition from road, air and 
water transport. No one would wish to 
minimize this problem. However, the 
unions gave two replies, each of which 
deserves attention. 

They pointed first to the testimony on 
this point given before the Board of Trans- 
port Commissioners by Mr. Stone, the 
CPR official mentioned earlier. The follow- 
ing extracts from Mr. Stone's evidence are 
relevant. 

He stated, "I doubt very much whether 
truck transport has actually increased 
percentage-wise more than rail transporta- 
tion . . ." and he continued, 

Trucks have been operating now 
for quite a number of years and air- 
planes are now in the picture. Notwith- 
standing that, the total volume of railway 
traffic has been increasing, and it has 
been increasing at a rate at least equal 
to, if not greater than, the increase in 
the physical output of all goods _ and 
services in Canada. This seems to indi- 
cate that there has been room for all of 
the forms of transportation notwith- 
standing the fact that other forms of 
transportation are growing . . . 

I fully suspect that Mr. Stone's evidence 
is accurate and valid. The problem is 
apparently not mere competition but the 



lack of regulation of all transportation 
instead of regulation for railway transporta- 
tion only. 

The spokesman for the Unions before 
this Board informed us that the railway 
employees in their submissions to another 
body had urged regulation of all forms of 
transportation. He expressed the opinion 
that that was the proper answer to the 
problem of competition which faces the 
railways, rather than asking the railway 
employees to carry the load. 

Another point which the Railways 
stressed was the question of additional 
revenues which they would require to meet 
the unions' wage demands. The unions 
took the position that the question of 
revenues which they would require to meet 
increased costs was a matter for the Board 
of Transport Commissioners and not for a 
Conciliation Board dealing with wages. ^ 

The establishment of freight rates is a 
matter of national policy. The factors 
which enter into the problem are related 
to the entire national economy, including 
the import and export industries which 
are so important to Canada. Decisions 
to keep freight rates at certain levels are 
made on the basis of national considera- 
tions. Such considerations are responsible 
for certain differentials in freight rates and 
for keeping transportation costs on certain 
basic and important commodities which 
move across and out of the country at 
substantially lower levels. 

The unions take the position that the 
railway employees alone should not be 
made to bear the burden of decisions^ and 
policies which are made by a national 
agency and the national Parliament for 
the benefit of the entire national economy. 
If such decisions and policies involve 
adjustments, the burden, in the submission 
of the unions, should be spread across the 
nation and not alone on the railway 
workers. 

In my view, this position of the railway 
employees, is valid and unanswerable. The 
question of additional revenue to which 
the Railwav may or may not be entitled 
as a result of the eventual wage settle- 
ment, is a matter for the Board of Trans- 
port Commissioners. That agency alone 
has the legal competence and the financial 
information to make a decision on the 
matter. . T 

In the light of the above discussions, 1 
now come to the question of what is a 
justified and justifiable recommendation on 
wages. In seeking a group of industries 
which may fairly be compared with the 
non-operating railway employees, the Chair- 
man of this Board as arbitrator in another 



80 



dispute in 1950, settled on the group of 
durable goods industries as the most com- 
parable. I agree that to the extent that 
such comparisons can be made, the durable 
goods group is as fair, subject to one 
reservation, as may be found. My reserva- 
tion relates to the inclusion of the wood 
products industry in the comparison, but 
with this I shall deal later. For the 
moment I am prepared to use the group 
as a whole as the basis for measuring the 
wage adjustment, appropriate in this case. 

My respectful difference with my 
colleagues is that I cannot accept as valid 
the proposition that the earnings of the 
railway employees should be mechanically 
placed at the same level as the average 
earnings of the durable goods group. This 
is, in effect, one of the two bases for the 
majority recommendation, the other being 
the rise in the cost of living. In stating 
this, I am not losing sight of the fact that 
my colleagues have made an allowance of 
some five cents against probable further 
advances in the durable goods average 
during the next 10 or 12 months. 

I adopt a statement made by the 
spokesman for the railways, although in a 
different context. He said, "We submit 
that the influence of the general wage trend 
is the important thing if a comparison is 
to be made with railway wages for such 
a diverse group as the non-operating 
employees" (Italicizing mine). 

In attempting to measure an appropriate 
wage adjustment it is seldom, if ever, 
justifiable to apply an average in a 
different group of industries automatically 
and mechanically. The appropriate appli- 
cation is one that is based on the "general 
wage trend", and this is the basis which 
sjaould, in my view, be used here. 

There are other and even more com- 
pelling reasons why the rate of increase 
rather than the actual increase in cents is 
the appropriate measure in the comparison 
between the average in the durable goods 
industries and the employees here con- 
cerned. The first reason concerns the 
inclusion in the durable goods group of 
the wood products industry. In my 
opinion, this industry has no place in any 
comparison with railway employees. 

It must first be noted, to avoid any 
misunderstanding, that the wood products 
group here referred to does not include 
the manufacture of paper products. It 
does not, in other words, include the pulp 
and paper industry, nor miscellaneous paper 
products. This industry is not one of the 
durable goods group. 



The wood products industry comprises 
saw and planing mills, furniture manufac- 
turing and miscellaneous wood products. 
This industry is in large measure highly 
seasonal; it is in substantial measure 
small-scale; it is unskilled to a much larger 
proportion than the other industries in the 
group and than railway employees; it is 
unorganized to a much greater extent than 
the other industries in the durable goods 
group, and certainly than are railway 
employees. In short, the wood products 
industry falls within the category of the 
less organized, seasonal and low-paid indus- 
tries. It is, therefore, quite inappropriate 
to take this sort of industry into the 
comparison. 

Secondly, it is important to bear in mind 
that the statistics on the durable goods 
industries cover unorganized as well as 
organized, small-scale as well as large-scale, 
uneconomic as well as economic units; 
small, private companies and partnerships 
as well as public corporations. How can 
it be appropriate to compare wages in some 
small, unorganized plant manufacturing 
glass or clay products or even steel equip- 
ment or auto parts with wages in gigantic 
national railway system? Yet such plants 
are included and affect the over-all average 
in the statistics. 

Surely it is necessary to take account 
of all these important factors. They serve 
to explain why the average for iron and 
steel products as at August 1, 1952, was 
145-5 cents, while the middle rate in basic 
steel is over $1.70. They also explain 
why the average for transportation equip- 
ment on the same date was 146-4 cents, 
while the average for Massey Harris was 
$1.71. 

In short, the actual hourly or weekly 
earnings in the durable goods group as a 
whole are dragged down by the inclusion 
of the wood products industry and of 
unorganized as well as organized units, 
small scale as well as large scale industry, 
and uneconomical as well as economical 
establishments. 

For the above reasons I find it impossible 
to agree that the earnings of the railway 
employees involved in these proceedings 
should be the same as the average earnings 
of employees in the durable goods industry. 
The result of such a proposition and its 
application is to level down the wages of 
railway employees to earnings which are 
affected by factors which do not obtain in 
the case of the railways. 

In my view, the proper application of 
the comparison between Railway wages and 
those in the durable goods group is to 



67040— £ 



81 



give the employees before this Board the 
same, or approximately the same rate of 
increase during the period under review. 

As of August 31, 1950, the date on which 
the last railway settlement became effec- 
tive, a certain relationship was established 
between the weekly earnings of the Railway 
employees here in question and the 
employee in the durable goods group. No 
case has been or can be made out for 
destroying that relationship adversely to 
the Railway employees. As at the date 
mentioned, the average weekly earnings of 
the Railway employees were 51-62, while 
the average weekly earnings of the durable 
goods workers were 46-85. I do not believe 
that it can be shown that the differential 
was not thoroughly justified in view of the 
factors and differences which were discussed 
earlier. 

The following table gives the percentage 
increases which have taken place in all 
manufacturing, in the durable goods group 
as a whole, and in the industries making 
up the durable goods group. One column 
shows the percentage increases in hourly 
earnings and the other in weekly earnings, 
from September 1950 to August 1952, the 
term of the last agreements between the 
Railways and the seventeen unions before 
this Board. 

Percentage Increases 

in hourly and weekly earnings 

as at August, 1952 — over September, 1950 

Hourly Weekly 

All manufacturing 23-5 21-9 

Durable goods 22-9 22-5 

Wood products 9-9 9-7 

Iron and steel products. 24-8 22-7 
Transportation equip- 
ment 19-7 21-6 

Non-ferrous metal 

products 32-2 25-8 

Electrical apparatus and 

supplies 21-0 211 

Non-metallic mineral 

products 24-1 24-3 

It will be noted from the above table 
that, even when the wood products indus- 
try is included, the percentage increases 
for the durable goods group as a whole 
during the two years under review were 
22-9 per cent in hourly earnings and 22-5 
per cent in weekly earnings. I believe that 
it is this rate of increase which is properly 
applicable to the non-operating railway 
employees. 

My recommendation is, therefore, that 
the wages of the Railway employees in 
these proceedings be increased by a number 



of cents equivalent to a 20 per cent 
increase on the average. The present 
average earnings of these employees is $1.30 
per hour. The increase which I, therefore, 
recommend is an average of 26 cents per 
hour. This order of increase is fully justi- 
fied by all the facts which appear to me 
relevant. 

The validity of this recommendation may 
be fully supported on another basis. Even 
if one accepted the principle of establishing 
some kind of parity between the average 
earnings of the durable goods worker and 
those of the Railway employees, one 
arrives at the same final rate as the above 
recommendation produces, if proper allow- 
ance is made for some other relevant 
factors. 

At September of this year the durable 
goods hourly average was 141-1 cents. To 
this must be added some adequate provi- 
sion for the probability of continuing 
advance in the durable goods earnings 
during the next year, as well as a proper 
allowance for the difference in fringe 
benefits between the two groups. Thus, 
the September average for the durable 
goods group was higher than the August 
one by almost 2 cents, and even the 
September increase did not include a 
number of increases already in effect and 
some others which are to come into effect 
during the period of the Railway agree- 
ment here in dispute. 

Prognostication is always difficult, and 
there are no precise ways of measuring 
what the likely future advance in the 
durable goods industry may be. We can 
only be guided by the past, making allow- 
ance for influences which can be foreseen. 

As shown in the earlier table, the in- 
crease in the durable goods industries over 
the two year period from September 1950, 
to and including August 1952, was between 
22^ per cent and 23 per cent. This is an 
average annual rate of increase of slightly 
more than eleven per cent. It is, how- 
ever, reasonable to assume that the rate of 
increase during the next year is likely to 
be substantially smaller. 

The cost of living seems to be stabilized 
at the present time. While one cannot be 
certain that another upward trend may not 
come, it seems less rather than more likely. 
The pressure on wages exerted by the 
rising cost of living will, therefore, likely 
be less in the next year than it was in the 
past two years. It is also reasonable to 
assume that as a general wage level goes 
up. the rate of increase slows down. 

For these, among other reasons, it would 
not be reasonable to forecast the same rate 



82 



of increase during the next twelve months 
as during the past twenty-four months. I 
would, therefore cut the rate of increase in 
half as a forecast of what is likely to 
happen during the next twelve months. I 
appreciate that my doing so is entirely 
arbitrary, but it is necessarily so. There 
is no way, to my knowledge, by which it is 
possible to make such a forecast with any 
scientific accuracy. It seems to me, how- 
ever, that the above analysis is not too 
invalid and the forecast based on it not 
too unreasonable. 

An adjustment of 5-5 per cent must 
therefore be made on this count on the 
September average earnings of the durable 
goods workers of 141-1 cents. This 
amounts to 7-8 cents. 

We must now attempt to evaluate the 
fringe benefits which the durable goods 
worker obtains and the Railway employees 
in these proceedings do not. I pointed out 
early in this report that the only fringe 
benefits which the Railway employees have 
(aside from travel privileges) are annual 
vacations with pay and pensions. I also 
pointed out, by reference to Government 
information, that the annual vacations with 
pay obtaining on the railways are substan- 
tially below the vacation plans obtaining 
in about one-third of the durable goods 
group. 

On the Railway Pension Plan, the union 
spokesman before this Board expressed the 
view that it was less advanced than Pension 
Plans obtaining in other industries. How- 
ever, no evidence was produced to support 
this statement. 

Even if we assume that no allowance 
is due in respect of annual vacations and 
pensions, there still remains the shocking 
fact that the Railway employees in ques- 
tion do not enjoy any paid statutory 
holidays and do not have any health and 
welfare plan. I leave out of consideration 
shift premiums because they are included 
in the figures of average earnings for the 
durable goods industries. 

With great respect, I cannot agree that 
merely because the unions in this case have 
not asked for these fringe benefits, no 
account should be taken of their value in 
arriving at a recommendation regarding the 
wage increase. If we are to apply to the 
Railway employees the income or its 
equivalent of the durable goods worker, 
then surely we cannot ignore the monetary 
value to him of statutory holidays and 
health and welfare plans. This is particu- 
larly valid, it seems to me, in view of the 
fact that so large a proportion of the 
durable goods workers enjoy these benefits. 



There is no difficulty about calculating 
the monetary value of statutory holidays. 
In the case before us, I calculate that value 
to be one-half of one cent per hour per 
employee, for one paid statutory holiday. 
I see no reason why these employees, with 
such a long history of collective bargain- 
ing, should be given the benefit of less 
than eight paid holidays which is common 
in most, if not all basic organized industry 
in Canada. This means a monetary allow- 
ance of four cents per hour. 

It is much more difficult to calculate 
the appropriate monetary allowance for 
Health and Welfare plans. Such plans 
vary in the proportion of employer con- 
tribution as well as in the cost. They 
vary in value all the way from about l\ 
cents per hour to 3 or 4 cents per hour. 
It would, it seems to me, not be unreason- 
able in the circumstance to allow 2^ cents 
to the Railway employees for the equiv- 
alent of a Health and Welfare plan. 

If the above adjustments are made, we 
arrive at a figure of average earnings of 
155-4 cents per hour (141-1 plus 7-8 plus 
4 plus 2-5). My recommendation of an 
average hourly increase of 26 cents would 
result in average hourly earnings of 156 
cents. 

This confirms and, in my respectful 
opinion, fully supports the recommendation 
made on the basis of the rate of increase 
in the durable goods industries since 
September 1950. I am further strength- 
ened in my recommendation by reference 
to the increases granted by the Railways 
to some of the operating unions. Thus 
the Engineers have been given an increase 
of 11 per cent. On the basis of informa- 
tion supplied by the Railways, I have 
calculated what the 11 per cent increase 
to these employees would amount to in 
terms of hourly increases on the basis of 
the number of hours worked per month 
by the non-operating employees. My 
calculations indicate that CPR passenger 
engineers received an increase, on the 
hourly basis as stated, of 27-4 cents 
minimum and 32-8 cents maximum. CPR 
freight engineers received 24-7 cents 
minimum and 29-3 cents maximum on the 
same basis. CNR passenger engineers 
received 28-5 cents per hour minimum and 
34-3 cents per hour maximum. CNR 
freight engineers received 25-9 cents 
minimum and 30-7 cents maximum. And 
the Board was informed that in periods 
of relatively heavy traffic the amount of 
time worked by operating personnel tends 
to be at or around the maximum rather 
that at or around the minimum. 



67040— 6i 



83 



However that may be, I can see every 
justification for a recommendation which, 
if supported by other valid grounds, 
aproximates in cents the minimum increase 
granted to other employees of the Railways. 

It is my belief that the Canadian people 
would be in support of the principle that 
employees of a basic industry like the 
Railways deserve and are entitled to wages 
vvhich compare favourably with the leaders 
of the land rather than with the stragglers. 
It is also my belief that the Canadian 
people would agree that the employees and 
the Union here concerned should not be 
penalized, relatively to the gains made by 
other employees and other unions, because 
the Railway unions have through the years 
acted moderately and responsibly. 

Form of Increase 

Regarding the issue as to whether the 
increase this time should consist of a 
number of cents across the board or be 
on a percentage basis, I am in agreement 
with the conclusion of my colleagues. I 
believe there is validity in the desire of 
the railways not to continue the process 
of erosion of differentials. I also agree 
with my colleagues that the change to the 
percentage increase basis need not be, and 
should not be, made in one settlement. 

I therefore propose that the recommenda- 
tion made above of an average increase 
of 26 cents per hour be applied at this 
time in two ways, namely, an increase of 
10 per cent on present wages plus an 
across the board increase of 13 cents per 
hour. 

Cost-of -Living Escalator Clause 

If I understand the reasons for the 
objections to an escalator clause correctly, 
they are basically two. The first is a 
general objection to an escalator clause in 
a one-year agreement, particularly in view 
of the fact that there is always a con- 
siderable time-lag between the filing of an 
application for freight increases by the 
Railways and the handing down of a 
decision by the Board of Transport 
Commissioners. 

The second objection is based on the 
belief that the rise in the cost of living 
in the next twelve months is not likely to 
be substantial, if there is any rise at all. 

The answer to the second objection is 
obvious. If the rise in the index should 
prove to be unsubstantial, then the 
escalator clause would not come into oper- 
ation. Its presence in the agreement would 



be of some psychological value to the 
employees and would do the railways no 
harm. 

The answer to the first objection is, in 
my view, also clear. As the unions pointed 
out in their submissions, the increase in 
the cost-of-living index between September 
1, 1950 (169-8), and September 1, 1951 
(189-8), was of the order of 20 points or 
11-8 per cent. On the other hand, there 
was actually some decrease in the index 
in the second year of the last contract, 
namely, between September 1951 and 
September 1952. 

However, the fact that there have 
recently been j^ears in which the rise in 
the cost of living was substantial, as sub- 
stantial as 11-8 per cent, fully justifies the 
desire of the employees to have protection 
against such an eventuality. The fact of 
the matter is that at the end of the two- 
year period of the last agreement, the 
employees lost the equivalent of some 15 
cents per hour in their purchasing power. 

As to the not unreasonable argument 
that the Railways are under a particular 
handicap because of the way in which the 
price for their service is set, the unions 
again gave, what seems to me, a con- 
clusive answer. The existence of a collec- 
tive agreement, without an escalator clause, 
subjects emploj^ees to a time-lag in exactly 
the same way as the railways are sub- 
jected to it by the process of obtaining 
additional revenue. Thus the employees 
lost purchasing power every month from 
September 1950 to January 1952. Through- 
out those 15 months there was a con- 
tinuous rise in the cost of living, and 
every month, progressively, the purchasing 
power of the employees was reduced. An 
adjustment based on the cost of living 
made at the end of the period does not 
compensate them for the losses in pur- 
chasing power which they suffered through- 
out the period. 

The question therefore resolves itself 
into whether this Board should give 
greater weight to the possible loss of the 
railways caused by the time-lag referred to 
or to give greater weight to the loss of 
the employees and their families. One or 
the other must, by the circumstances 
referred to, be placed at a disadvantage. 
I have no hesitation in concluding that this 
Board should give greater weight to the 
possible loss to the employees, since it 
would directly affect the welfare of their 
families. 

I would therefore recommend the inclu- 
sion of an escalator clause in this collec- 
tive agreement providing for adjustments 



84 



at quarterly intervals, so as to reduce 
possible dislocation by more frequent 
adjustments. Since the new Consumers' 
Price Index is now in effect, it would be 
necessary for the Unions and the Railways 
to work out a formula appropriate to the 
new Index. 

Union Shop and Check-off 

My second major disagreement with my 
colleagues is their failure to recommend 
an adequate form of union security. The 
actual proposals of the Unions in this case 
are set out in full in the report of the 
majority of the Board. 

A great deal has been written and said 
on the principles of the union shop. Those 
opposing a form of effective union security 
base their opposition on the ground that 
it interferes with the liberty of the 
employees to join or not to join as they 
wish. They point to the fact that such 
freedom is not only basic to our demo- 
cratic system but is also safeguarded in the 
statutes governing labour relations. 

Philosophical discussions of principle on 
issues of this sort are always difficult, and 
reconciliation of differences is even more 
difficult. The premises on which the 
protagonists proceed are much more in the 
nature of beliefs than of logical conclu- 
sions. They are dictated more by experi- 
ence and motives than by intellectual 
analysis. 

. Appeals to the principles of liberty 
and freedom have, in industrial history, 
frequently been used to oppose necessary 
social progress. It is a historical fact that 
the introduction of laws against child and 
female labour, laws to establish minimum 
wages or maximum hours, those relating 
,to safety measures in industrial under- 
taking, or laws governing combines, to give 
only a few examples, were in their day 
opposed because they were alleged to 
interfere with the liberty of the individual. 
Undoubtedly they did so interfere, but in 
the interests of a higher and more universal 
form of liberty. Today it is universally 
recognized that all such laws of protection 
have been milestones on the road of 
humanity's progress. 

I have a strong conviction that the 
propositions about liberty and freedom 
voiced against union security will in time 
be shown to be as misapplied as in the 
examples given. There is, after all, no 
interference with any citizen's liberty when, 
on seeking employment, he is informed that 
there is a recognized trade union in the 
industry, that such union acts by law on 
behalf of all the employees and that, con- 
sequently, he is required to take his place 



and to play his part as a member of that 
union. Nor is there any loss of liberty in 
informing an employee that there has been 
a trade union bargaining collectively on 
behalf of all employees for a long time, 
that he, as well as the others, has bene- 
fited from that collective bargaining and 
that, by decision of the vast majority of 
the employees, it is now proposed to 
require every employee to take his place 
and play its part in the union and to con- 
tribute to its upkeep and administration. 

Surely it is not possible to deny that in 
most cases the interference is not with the 
liberty of the employee, but rather with 
his greed and indifference. The reason why 
an employee fails .to join his appropriate 
union in an industry which has enjoj^ed a 
long history of collective bargaining is, in 
the vast majority of cases, disinterest and, 
in some cases, sheer selfishness and 
parasitism. 

In my view, therefore, it is a mistake 
to be impressed with arguments regarding 
liberty in matters such as the union shop. 
It is of much greater relevance to consider 
two other basic principles of democratic 
behaviour, namely, that every right in- 
volves an obligation and that every 
member of a community should contribute 
to its upkeep and to its necessary services 
from which he benefits. The principle of 
liberty in a modern democracy must be 
given positive application through the 
widest possible participation by all citizens 
in the instruments of democracy. 

The non-operating employees of the Rail- 
ways in this dispute have enjoyed collective 
bargaining for many decades. As a result 
of that collective bargaining all of the 
employees, whether members of the unions 
or not, have gained many rights and 
numerous benefits. Surely, it is neither 
fair nor democratic that a proportion of the 
employees should enjoy the rights gained 
for them by their fellow employees without 
themselves carrying out their corresponding 
obligation to be active and participating 
citizens in their industrial community. And 
similarly, it is neither fair nor democratic 
that some employees should enjoy the 
benefits gained for them by the Unions 
without making any financial contribution 
to the servicing of the collective agreement-? 
from which they benefit, and of carrying 
on the necessary and costly activities of 
the agency which serves them. 

There are other and more practical con- 
siderations which the Unions drew to the 
Board's attention. The wider the mem- 
bership in the Unions, the more do they 



85 



reflect the wishes of the employees and 
the more difficult does it become for a 
small group of demagogues to gain control. 

There is also the effect of the resentment 
which union members justly feel against 
"free Riders". The resentment is entirely 
justified and understandable and it results 
in ill-feeling among employees which can- 
not but be harmful to efficiency. The above 
and similar considerations more than out- 
weight, in my view, the alleged loss of 
freedom. 

There is a further and important practical 
consideration applicable to all industry and 
to the railway industry in particular. The 
lack of union shop and check-off provisions 
in a collective agreement places on the 
committees and personnel of the unions a 
terrific burden of canvassing for member- 
ship and of collecting dues. This burden 
is particularly great in the case of the 
Railways because the employees are 
scattered from east to west and from north 
to south across the country. The union- 
management and employee-employer rela- 
tionship would surely benefit if the time 
and efforts spent by committees and 
personnel on these things were available for 
servicing of the agreements and for study, 
discussion and consideration of policies. 

The evidence before the Board, estab- 
lishes that the principles on which the 
Railways claim to base their position are 
certainly not such as to be incapable of 
adaptation, to put it gently. The evidence 
is that the Eastern Carriers in the United 
States concluded agreements with 15 of 
the 17 unions before this Board providing 
for exactly the same form of union shop 
and check-off of union dues as are requested 
here. Further, the Canadian National and 
Canadian Pacific Railways are parties to 
those agreements, since they have branch 
lines and employ workers in eastern United 
States. Surely the unions in Canada can- 
not be blamed for resenting the refusal of 
the Railways to grant their Canadian 
employees what they have already granted 
their American employees. 

The reply of the Railways is that in the 
Carriers' Conference of the Eastern United 
States they form a very small part and 
they, therefore could not refuse to go along 
with the other railways. This appears to 
me to be more in the nature of an evasion 
than a justification. If the principles to 
which the Railways claim to cling are as 
strong as they make them out to be, then 
surely it was their duty to stand on them 
in the United States as in Canada. 
Furthermore, if the American Railways, 
which had raised the same principles, 



could see fit to grant the Union Shop and 
check-off, then again, the principles cannot 
be as sacred as they are here alleged. It 
seems to me provocative, to say the least, 
to refuse the Unions before us a privilege 
which has been granted to the same unions 
in the United States. 

On this issue, as on the one of wages, 
we have here a case where an industry 
which should be in the vanguard is proving 
to be among the most intractable. The 
Railways filed an exhibit which contained 
the conclusions of an analysis made by the 
Department of Labour of 937 Collective 
Agreements covering some 610,279 
employees. The date of publication of the 
results of this analysis would seem to be 
May 30, 1952. 

The Exhibit shows that collective agree- 
ments covering 32-8 per cent of the total 
number of employees under review con- 
tained provisions for a closed shop, union 
shop, or a modified union shop. Agree- 
ments covering 12-7 per cent of the 
employees contained provisions for main- 
tenance of membership in its various 
forms. Thus a total of 45*45 per cent or 
almost one-half of the employees in the 
survey were covered by collective agree- 
ments providing for the highest forms of 
union security. 

The same survey shows that some 22 
per cent of the employees covered were 
working under collective agreements pro- 
viding for compulsory check-off in com- 
bination with closed or union shops, for 
the Rand Formula or modified Rand 
Formula, and for compulsory check-off for 
all union members. Some 15 per cent 
were covered by collective agreements 
containing provisions for voluntary irrevoc- 
able check-off and some 5 per cent 
provisions for some sort of combination 
of voluntary and compulsory. Thus some 
42 per cent of the employees under review 
in the aforementioned survey were covered 
by agreements providing for either com- 
pulsory check-off of one form or another 
or voluntary but irrevocable check-off. 
Another almost 33 per cent were working 
under agreements providing for voluntary 
revocable check-off or voluntary check-off 
without specifying whether it was revocable 
or irrevocable. Altogether, therefore, close 
to 75 per cent of the employees in the 
survey enjoyed some form of check-off. 

The above are the facts about union 
security and check-off in Canadian indus- 
try. And it was admitted before the Board 
that the trend continues in the direction 
of greater union security. In the light of 
these facts I can find no justification for 



86 



rejecting the request of the Unions in this 
case. In my respectful view, these Unions 
have such an unassailable history of 
responsible leadership that if any Union is 
entitled to the privilege, they are entitled 
to it beyond question. 

To ask the Unions before us to stand 
on the sidelines and watch the parade along 
Union Security Avenue growing in size and 
strength for other and younger unions, with 
a much more turbulent history, while they 
are refused admission to that Avenue, is 
to ask for the unreasonable and to beg 
for trouble. 

With some trepidation, and with great 
respect, I must take issue with what 
appears to be a main ground for the 
rejection by my colleagues of the Union 
Shop request. If I understand their argu- 
ment correctly, it is that the prohibition 
against membership in a dual union which 
is contained in the Union Constitutions, 
would bring a Union Shop provision in the 
collective agreement into conflict with sub- 
section (2) of Section 6 of the Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation Act. 
The said subsection reads: — 

(2) No provision in a collective agree- 
ment requiring an employer to discharge 
an employee because such employee is 
or continues to be a member of, or 
engages in activities on behalf of a union 
other than a specified 'trade union, shall 
be valid. 

The first point to note is that this sub- 
section is not concerned with the conditions 
which a union may or may not attach to 
membership in the organization. It is 
concerned only with the point that a 
provision in a collective agreement which 
'requires the discharge of an employee for 
membership or activity in a dual union, 
shall not be valid. In other words, it safe- 
guards the right of employees to change 
their union affiliation. 

Put conversely, the subsection does not 
invalidate a Union Shop provision if it 
does not require the discharge of an 
employee for membership or activity in 
a duel union. This the union shop clause 
proposed in this case does not require; it 
excludes such a ground for discharge by 
expressly limiting the application of union 
membership as a condition of employ- 
ment. It does so by the following 
proviso: — 

That such condition shall not apply 

with respect to . . . any employee to 

whom membership was denied or termin- 



ated for any reason other than failure 
of the employee to tender the periodic 
dues, initiation fees and assessments (not 
including fines and penalties) uniformly 
required as the condition of acquiring or 
maintaining membership. 

Surely, if an employee is refused, or is 
expelled from membership because he is 
a member of or active in another union, 
he is so refused or expelled for a "reason 
other than failure of the employee to 
tender the periodic dues", etc. By the 
express words of the proposed, clause, 
therefore, the condition does not apply to 
him. He need not in the circumstances 
be discharged. 

The clause proposed to this Board, 
therefore, not only does not conflict with 
Section 6 (2) of the Act, but expressly 
meets its requirements. 

The fact is that the proviso in the 
proposal of the Unions, quoted above, goes 
even further. Union constitutions provide 
many other grounds for disciplining mem- 
bers or for refusing or expelling from 
membership. Some are political grounds 
directed against communists or fascists. 
Some are general grounds, such as exces- 
sive attacks on the organization, its 
members, or officers, or working . against 
the welfare of the organization or its 
members. 

None of such other grounds would bring 
the proposed Union Shop into operation. 
The proviso quoted above clearly means 
that if an employee is refused admission 
into the Union or is expelled from mem- 
bership for any cause other than failure 
to pay the normal dues, he cannot for 
that reason be discharged, whether the 
refusal to admit or the expulsion was due 
to dual unionism or to any other violation 
of the Union constitution except the 
requirement to pay dues. 

The Union Constitutions do not affect 
and are not affected by the statute or the 
proviso in the proposed Union Shop clause. 
The Union, party to the collective agree- 
ment, would continue to admit and 
discipline members in accordance with its 
constitution. But in certain cases, defined 
by the Act and provided for in the pro- 
posed clause, union membership would 
cease to be or would not become a condi- 
tion of employment for the employee or 
employees concerned. The two things are 
separate in fact and, in my respectful 
opinion, severable in law. 

In my respectful submission, therefore, 
there is nothing in the proposed Union 
Shop clause which brings it into conflict 



87 



with the law. On the contrary, the pro- 
posed clause fully meets the requirements 
of the law. 

In any case, all a Board of Conciliation 
is required to do is to make a recom- 
mendation. In doing so, it can amend or 
niter any proposal made by either side. 
Therefore, even if any doubt remained on 
the point discussed above, the Board was 
at liberty to point out the problem and 
suggest a solution. It would surely not be 
difficult to incorporate into the collective 
agreement the precise words of Section 
6 (2), notwithstanding anything contained 
in the constitutions of the seventeen unions 
concerned. 

On the question of the check-off of dues, 
the Railways made much of the incon- 
venience and cost. One cannot be 
impressed by these arguments. The Rail- 
ways informed the Board that they now 
make numerous deductions for government, 
"for relatively small groups" and "for 
commercial companies" although in the 
case of the latter the Railways are com- 
pensated for the work involved. I have 
not been able to find it on the record, 
but my impression is that someone sug- 
gested that the deductions in some cases 
number over sixty or seventy. In view 
of all this, it is surely not much to ask 



the Railways that they co-operate with 
their unions in checking off membership 
dues. 

I am, therefore, glad to agree with my 
colleagues in their recommendation for a 
check-off of union dues. However, I must 
emphasize again that, in my view, a 
voluntaiy check-off is a totally inadequate 
form of union security for the industry and 
Unions concerned in these proceedings. 

Conclusions 

The recommendations of this Minority 
Report may be summarized as follows: — 

(1) An increase to non-operating 
employees of ten per cent of their present 
wages plus an additional 13 cents per hour 
across the Board, effective as of September 
1, 1952 (the last agreement having expired 
on August 31). 

(2) A cost-of-living escalator clause pro- 
viding for quarterly adjustments and based 
on a formula to be worked out by the 
parties on the basis of the new Consumers' 
Price Index. 

(3) Provisions for the Union Shop and 
check-off of union dues in the terms of the 
clauses proposed by the Unions. 

Dated this 24th day of November, 1952. 

Respectfully submitted. 

(Sgd.) David Lewis. 



Report of Board in Dispute between 

McCabe Grain Company Limited (Shamrock Elevator 

and Feed Mill, St. Boniface) 

and 

Local 105, International Union of United Brewery, 

Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers 

of America 



In this dispute the employer is McCabe 
Grain Company Limited and the employees 
are those employed in the Shamrock 
Elevator and Feed Mill located at St. 
Boniface, Manitoba. This is a relatively 
small part of the operations of the 
company which is a large grain company. 
The number of employees varies from 
approximately twelve to twenty-four 
depending on the season. 

The union was certified as bargaining 
agent for these employees on November 16, 
1951. During the course of the hearings 
before this Board, however, it appeared that 
the union had previously been certified as 



bargaining agent in the company's seed 
plant which is located in St. Boniface near 
the Shamrock Elevator and Seed Mill. It 
appears that the company and the union 
did negotiate and sign an agreement 
covering these other employees. When this 
fact was communicated to the Board the 
company indicated that if the parties were 
permitted to resume direct negotiations an 
agreement might be consummated on a 
similar basis to the agreement in effect 
between the same company and the same 
union in their seed plant. The Board 
agreed and in fact encouraged the resump- 
tion of direct negotiations. However, it 



88 



appears that the parties have not 3 r et been 
able to arrive at an agreement and it is 
necessary for the Board to formulate a 
report. 

The basic issues in dispute between the 
union and the company arc union security 
and rates of pay and those matters relating 
directly to wage rates. 

It is the considered opinion of the Board 
that the agreement consummated between 
these two parties in their seed division 
should constitute the basis of agreement 
between the same parties in the Shamrock 
Elevator and Feed Mill except for the 
following clauses: — 

1. Hours of Work and Overtime 

(a) Forty-four (44) hours shall constitute 
a standard work week, consisting of 
eight (8) hours per day, from 
Monday to Friday inclusive, and 
four (4) hours on Saturday. (We 
understand that the forty-four (44) 
hour week is now in effect.) 

(b) Overtime shall be paid after eight 
(8) hours in any one day at the rate 
of time and one-half from Monday 
to Fridaj' - inclusive, and at the same 
rate after four (4) hours on Saturday. 

2. Wages 

Rates of pay for work performed in the 
standard day shift shall be as follows: — 

General Labour starting rate • 88 V cents 
per hour plus 5 cents C.O.L.B. 

-General Labour after 60 days -984 cents 
per hour plus 5 cents C.O.L.B. 

With regard to the other classifications 
of employees, we recommend that the 
existing differential between the various 
jobs be maintained. 

In addition to the foregoing rates the 
company should pay a variable cost-of- 
living bonus of -25 cents per point per 
week for each point rise in the official 
Cost-of-Living Index in excess of 185-0. 
It is understood that no reduction shall 
be made below the index floor of 185-0. 

It will now, of course, be necessaiy to 
adjust the Cost-of-Living bonus to the new 
consumer index. 

3. Union Security 

In view of the fact that this is the 
first agreement between these parties we 
cannot recommend an advanced form of 
union security. However, we do think 
that some form of union security should 
be granted at this time and would .recom- 
mend a voluntary revocable check-off. 

4. Retroactivity 

The standard rates of pay as recom- 
mended shall be effective the same date 



On November 30, 1952, the Minister 
of Labour received the unanimous 
report of the Board of Conciliation 
and Investigation appointed to deal 
with matters in dispute between the 
McCabe Grain Company Limited 
(Shamrock Elevator and Feed Mill, 
St. Boniface) and Local 105, Interna- 
tional Union of United Brewery, Flour, 
Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery 
Workers of America (L.G., June, 1952, 
p. 756). 

The Board w T as composed of H. G. H. 
Smith, QC, Chairman, who was 
appointed by the Minister on the joint 
recommendation of Clarence D. Shepard, 
QC, and Leon -Mitchell, who had 
previously been appointed on the 
nominations of the company and union 
respectively. All members of the Board 
reside in Winnipeg. 

The text of the Board's report is 
reproduced herewith. 



that the Agreement is considered effective. 
However, no other clause in the Agreement 
shall be deemed to have a retroactive 
effect. 

We understand that actually some of the 
above recommendations have been imple- 
mented by the company and are now in 
effect. The main factor therefore, which 
has been keeping this matter open is that 
no agreement has yet been signed. We 
feel very strongly that in the interest of 
harmonious labour relations in the plant 
this should be done without delay. Nego- 
tiations have been carried on for 
approximately one year in respect of a 
relatively small group of employees. On 
the part of the employer this has neces- 
sitated the attention from time to time 
of three or four company executives and 
the amount of time which has been spent 
in these negotiations cannot possibly be 
measured. From the Employees' point 
of view there is always a certain feeling 
of insecurity in the knowledge that negotia- 
tions are pending and that no agreement 
is in effect. The object of the Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation Act 
is basically to promote harmonious rela- 
tions between employers and employees 
and with this end in view to provide 
machinery leading to the consummation of 
collective agreements between the parties. 
From the employees' point of view the 
execution of an agreement has great 
importance as it means the recognition of 
the right of the union to bargain for them 
and to carry on its legitimate activities 



67040—7 



89 



in their interest. Until such an agreement 
is entered into therefore, there is always a 
certain feeling of insecurity as mentioned 
above and this feeling is not conducive to 
the best employer-employee relations in 
the plant. From the employer's point of 
view, as we have pointed out above, the 
longer negotiations are protracted the more 
time is taken which in itself does not tend 
towards the most satisfactory relationships 
in the plant. For these reasons we feel 
that it is to the mutual interest of the 
employer and the union to consummate an 
agreement without delay so that the irrita- 



tions which are bound to exist may be 
removed. Actually the parties are practi- 
cally in agreement in principle and it is 
our considered opinion that the situation 
should be reduced to writing as soon as 
possible. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

(Sgd.) H. G. H. Smith, 

Chairman. 
(Sgd.) C. D. Shepard, 

Member. 
(Sgd.) Leon Mitchell, 

Member. 



Report of Board in Dispute between 

Keystone Transports, Limited, Montreal 

and 

Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc. 



The Hon. Milton F. Gregg, 
Minister of Labour, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

In the matter of the Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act and 
dispute affecting Canadian Merchant 
Service Guild, Inc., applicant, and 
Keystone Transports, Limited, 
respondent. 

Sir: 

I have the honour to present the report 
of the Board of Conciliation appointed in 
the above case. The Board held the 
following meetings: Oct. 22, Oct. 24, Oct. 25. 
Oct. 31, Nov. 4, Nov. 7, Nov. 15 and 
Nov. 20. 

The issues between the parties were as 
follows : — 

(a) The Guild wished recognition in the 
wording of the contract that overtime was 
worked by deck officers employed on the 
Company's ships. The Company refused 
such recognition on the grounds that deck 
officers were professional employees who 
worked by the month, not b} r the standard 
day. 

(b) The Guild wished a total compen- 
sation at the end of the navigation season 
of 45 days pay in lieu of leave, overtime, 
extra services, etc. The Company were 
willing to pay a total of 34 days pay in 
lieu of leave, extra services, etc. 

After hearing evidence, the Board 
encouraged the two parties to re-open 
collective bargaining, under the auspices of 



On November 20, 1952, the Min- 
ister of Labour received the unanimous 
report of the Board of Conciliation and 
Investigation appointed to deal with 
matters in dispute between Keystone 
Transports, Limited, Montreal, and 
Canadian Merchant Service Guild, Inc. 
(L.G., Nov., 1952, p. 1467). 

The Board was composed of Prof. 
B. S. Keirstead, Chairman, appointed 
by the Minister in the absence of a 
joint recommendation from the other 
two members, John Bumbray, QC, and 
M. Swerdlow, who had previously been 
appointed on the nominations of the 
company and union respectively. All 
members of the Board reside in 
Montreal. 

The text of the Board's report is 
reproduced herewith. 



the Board, which attempted to play an 
appropriate conciliatory role. This was 
done. Eventually the two parties reached 
the point where the Guild offered to 
accept 40 days compensatory pay and to 
drop any reference in the wording to over- 
time, and the Company offered 37 days, 
without reference to overtime The Board 
suggested the figure of 38 days, and had 
reason to believe that this figure would be 
accepted by both parties. However, the 
Company subsequently refused to concede 
38 days, and even withdrew its offer of 

(Continued on page 121) 



90 



Collective Agreements 
and Wage {Schedules 

Recent Collective Agreements 



Welfare plans providing for life insur- 
ance, sickness and accident, hospitalization, 
medical or other benefits are contained in 
five of the agreements summarized in the 
accompanying article. In each case the 
employer pays the whole or part of the 
premium. 

Mining 

Metal Mining — Kimberley and Chapman 
Camp, B.C. — The Consolidated Mining 
and Smelting Company of Canada 
Limited and the International Union 
of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, 
Local 651. 

Agreement to be in effect from June 1, 
1952, to May 31, 1953, and thereafter, 
subject to 2 months' notice. This agree- 
ment is similar to the one between the 
company's plant at Trail, B.C., and Local 480 
of the union, summarized below under 
"Manufacturing", with the following classi- 
fications and the corresponding basic hourly 
wage rates added: barman $1.97-2, electric 
shovel operator $1.88£, chief flotation oper- 
ator $1.84, miner-timberman $1.79|. 

Manufacturing 

Clothing — Toronto, Out. — National Gar- 
ment Manufacturers Association 
(Men's Utility Clothing, Sportswear, 
Etc.) Representing Certain Firms and 
the United Garment Workers of 
America, Local 253. 

Agreement to be in effect from May 1, 
1952, to April 30, 1953, and for a further 
term of one year, subject to 30 days' notice. 

Union security: closed shop. The manu- 
facturers will engage workers directed to 
them by the union in response to their 
request. If the union fails to provide the 
required help within 48 hours, the manu- 
facturers may engage such help from the 
open market. 

Check-off: irrevocable check-off of union 
dues. 

Hours: 40 per week — Monday through 
Friday between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Overtime: 
time and one-half for work done during 
periods other than the above. In the slack 
period, when there is not sufficient work for 
all employees, the available work shall be 
divided as equally as possible among the 
employees. 

Statutory holidays: 6 specified paid and 2 
unpaid holidays will be observed. Time and 
one-half will be paid for work on one unpaid 
holiday and double time and one-half for 
work on 2 paid holidays. Xo employee shall 



A file of collective agreements is main- 
tained in the Economics and Research 
Branch of the Department of Labour. 
These are obtained directly from the 
parties involved and through the Indus- 
trial Relations Branch of the Depart- 
ment. A number of those recently 
received are summarized here. Agree- 
ments made obligatory under the Collec- 
tive Agreement Act in Quebec and 
schedules under Industrial Standards 
Acts, etc., are summarized in a separate 
article following this. 



be required to work on the other 4 paid 
and one unpaid holidays. New employees, 
who are not members of the union, must 
work for the firm for 6 weeks before being 
eligible for holiday pay. 

Vacation pay amounting to 2*5 per cent 
of gross earnings will be granted to 
employees after 3 months' service; after 3 
years' service employees will receive 4 per 
cent of gross earnings. Union members 
transferring from one shop, party to this 
agreement, to another are to receive vaca- 
tion pay without a 3-months employment 
period. 

Wages: both piece-work and time-work 
rates are increased by 5 cents per hour over 
the previous rates. Trainees and beginners 
will start at 60 cents per hour, this rate 
to be increased to 65 cents at the end of 
30 days' employment and to 70 cents per 
hour after 3 months' employment. Where 
piece-work rates prevail, a worker is^ to be 
placed on piece work as soon as he is able 
to earn more than _ hourly rates provide. 
In the event of an increase or decrease in 
the cost of living either party has the right 
to open the wages part of the agreement 
on March 1 and September 1, any wage 
changes agreed upon to become effective 
May 1 or November 1. 

The manufacturers agree not to engage in 
the practice of "contracting" their work to 
others. 

Welfare fund: up to April 30, 1952, manu- 
facturers were contributing 1*5 per cent of 
their payroll to the United Garment 
Workers' Welfare Fund; "thereafter with 
the consent here given by both parties to 
this agreement, a moratorium is declared for 
a period of one year, expiring April 30, 
1953. However, if deemed necessary by the 
Board of Directors of the Welfare Fund, 
the matter of the moratorium may be 
referred to the Union and the Association 
of Manufacturers in writing for further 
consideration or changes". 

Seniority shall prevail in case of lay-offs, 
shop stewards to retain top seniority. 

Provision is made for the settling of 
disputes and for the establishment of a 
special committee to investigate and make 
recommendations in the matter of prices on 
garments and homework. 



67040— 7i 



91 



Furniture — Toronto, Ont. — The Toronto 
Upholstered Furniture Manufacturers 
Association Incorporated and the 
Upholsterers' International Union of 
North America, Local 30. 

Agreement to be in effect from March 29, 
1952.. to September 15, 1953, and thereafter 
from year to year, subject to 30 days' notice. 
However, the question of wages may be 
re-opened for discussion should conditions 
warrant such re-opening. 

Union security: closed shop. The employer 
agrees to employ only union members in 
good standing. The union will be notified 
whenever additional workers are required. 
Should the union be unable to supply such 
workers within 24 hours, the manufacturer 
may hire workers from any other source, 
but such new workers must immediately 
join the union. 

Check-off: compulsory for all eligible 
employees after they have worked the pro- 
bationary period of 4 weeks. 

Hours: 8 per day Monday through Friday, 
a 40-hour week. Labourers may work an 
additional hour per day at the regular rate, 
provided such hour is spent in cleaning up 
or in performing other duties to meet fire 
insurance requirements. Overtime: time and 
one-half for work in excess of 40 hours per 
week; double time and one-half for work 
on 8 (previously 7) specified paid holidays. 
If overtime is necessary, permission from 
the union is required in advance. A firm 
shall not hire extra help unless the present 
staff cannot fill the required order by work- 
ing 6 hours overtime per week. During the 
slack period there will be equal division of 
work. No working partner shall perform 
work in the shop while the worker who 
regularly performs such work is laid off or 
is working part time. 

Rest periods: emplovees will be allowed 
two 15-minute rest periods a day. 

Vacations icith pay: after 3 months' con- 
tinuous service one week, after 3 years' 
service 2 weeks. However, employees with 
less than one year's service, who are granted 
one week, must sign a statement that they 
will continue in the employ of the firm up 
to December 31 of the year in which they 
receive their vacation. Should they leave 
their job without the manufacturers' con- 
sent they shall only be entitled to 2 per 
cent of their earnings. 

Hourly wage rates: upholsterers, seat- 
makers, trimmers, cutter in charge of 
cutting department $1.40; operators, cutters, 
springers, cushion fillers, polishers, assemblers 
with one or more years' exoerience $1.30: 
labourers, first 3 months 95 cents, there- 
after $1; labourers who have been receiving 
a 10 cent cost-of-living bonus shall con- 
tinue to receive same; learners, under 18 
years of age 48 to 68 cents, over 18 years 
of age 63 to 83 cents. 

Escalator clause: in addition to the above 
rates employees will be paid a cost-of-living 
bonus of 25 cents per week for every point 
increase in the cost of living since Sep- 
tember 1, 1948, as reported by the Dominion 
Government. Adjustments will be made 
downward on the same basis. 

Welfare plan: the employer agrees to pay 
towards the Upholsterers' International 
Union Social Security Plan an amount equal 
to 3 per cent of the payroll. 

Provision is made for grievance procedure. 



Printing and Publishing — Truro, N.S. — 
The Truro Printing and Publishing 
Company Limited and International 
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' 
Union of North America, Local 551. 

Agreement to be in effect from September 
10, 1952, to September 9, 1953, and there- 
after, subject to 60 days' notice. 

Union security: closed shop. 

Hours: 8 per day Monday through Friday, 
4 on Saturday, a 44-hour week. If it 
becomes necessary to employ a night shift, 
the hours for same shall be 8 per shift 
Monday through Friday, a 40-hour week. 
Overtime: time and one-half for the first 
4 hours of work performed before or after 
the regular day or night hours, double time 
thereafter and for work on any Sunday or 
statutory holiday. Six (previously 3) speci- 
fied holidays will be paid holidays. 

Vacations with pay: after one year's 
service one week, after 2 years' service 9 
working days, and after 3 years' service 2 
weeks. One month's sickness will be 
allowed per year before pay for annual 
vacations will be affected. 

Hourly wage rates: binderymen, pressmen, 
compositor, monotype from 43 cents during 
first 6 months to $1.13$ after 10th 6 months; 
monotype keyboard from. 43 cents to 91$ 
cents after 7th 6 months; press assistant 
(feeder) from 43 cents to 86 J cents after 
6th 6 months; platen feeder, proof reader, 
proof corrector from 37$ cents to 70 cents 
after 6th 6 months; bindery girls from 37$ 
cents to 59$ cents after 4th 6 months. (The 
above rates represent increases of 8 per 
cent over the previous rates.) Men-in-charge 
will receive a differential of not less than 
10 per cent of the journeymen's rate. 

Night shift differential: employees on the 
night staff will be paid a differential of 10 
per cent of the regular daily rate. 

Seniority: in cases of lay-offs, rehiring and 
promotion the personnel involved shall be 
agreed upon between the departmental fore- 
man and the company; in all cases seniority 
shall be taken into consideration. 

Provision is made for grievance procedure 
and the setting up of a Labour-Management 
Committee. 

Automobiles — Windsor, Ont . — Chrysler 
Corporation of Canada Limited and 
the International Union, United Auto- 
mobile, Aircraft and Agricultural 
Implement Workers of America, 
Local 195. 

Agreement to be in effect from June 17, 
1952, to June 17, 1954, and thereafter from 
year to year, subject to notice. Either party 
shall be entitled to re-open the agreement 
once, after June 17, 1953, on the general 
level of wage rates only. This agreement 
is similar to the one previously in effect 
(L.G., Jan., 1951, p. 60), with the following 
changes: — 

Overtime at the rate of time and one-half 
is now paid for work on both Saturdays 
and Sundays (previously only for work on 
Sundays) . 

Vacations with pay: vacation payments are 
increased for employees with 10 and more 
years' seniority: after 10 years' service 
employees will now be paid 2$, and after 15 



92 



years' service 3, weeks' vacation pay. 
(Previously all employees with 5 or more 
years' seniority received 2 weeks' vacation 
pay.) 

Wage rates for the various classifications 
are not given in the agreement. According 
to press reports employees received a gen- 
eral increase of 4 cents per hour with an 
additional 8 cents per hour granted to tool, 
die and maintenance classifications. 

Welfare plans: effective as of June 15, 
1952, the life insurance is increased from 
$3,000 to $3,600 and the sickness and acci- 
rent insurance from $21 to $28 weekly 
benefit. 

Automobiles — Windsor, Ont. — The Ford 
Motor Company of Canada Limited 
and the International Union, United 
Automobile, Aircraft and Agricultural 
Implement Workers of America, Local 
240 (Office Employees). 

Agreement, following strike (L.G., Aug., 
1952, p. 1157), to be in effect from June 2, 
1952, to June 2, 1954, and thereafter from 
year to year, subject to notice. 

Check-off: the company agrees to deduct 
from the pay of every employee in the 
bargaining unit covered by this agreement, 
who so authorizes, the regular monthly 
membership dues and to remit same to the 
union. The authorization may be revoked 
on June 2 in any year hereafter on 15 days' 
notice. 

Hours: 8 per day 5 days a week, a 40- 
hour week. 

Statutory holidays: salaried employees will 
be paid one and one-half times their 
equivalent hourly rate for work on 7 speci- 
fied holidays and hourly rated employees 
double time and one-half for work on 6 
specified paid holidays. 

Vacations ivith pay: salaried employees 
who were on the active roll of the com- 
pany as of December 1 of the preceding 
year will be granted 3 weeks if they had 
15 or more years' seniority, and 2 weeks 
if they had less than 15 years' seniority, 
as of that date. An employee who was not 
on the active roll as of December 1 of the 
preceding year, but who was so as of June 1 
of the current year, shall be entitled to 
one w^eek. Hourly rated employees with one 
and less than 3 years' seniority will be 
granted one week, those with 3 or more 
but less than 15 years' seniority 2 weeks 
and employees with 15 or more years' 
seniority 3 weeks, provided in each case that 
the employee has worked at least 200 days 
during the preceding year. If he has 
worked less than 200 days, he will be 
entitled to vacation pay amounting to 2, 4 
or 6 per cent of his actual earnings during 
the preceding year, depending on the number 
of years of seniority he has to his credit. 

Wages: salaried employees will receive an 
increase of $5.20 per month and hourly 
rated employees of 3 cents per hour, effec- 
tive June 15, 1952; further increases of the 
same amounts will be granted effective June 
15, 1953, all such increases to be added to 
the base rate. 

Escalator clause: all employees shall be 
paid a cost-of-living allowance on the 
following basis: for every 1-3 point rise in 
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics' cost-of- 
living index above 164 salaried employees 
will be granted an allowance of $1-733 per 
month and hourly rated employees an 



allowance of one cent per hour. Adjust- 
ments will be made quarterly, upwards or 
downwards, but in no event will a decline 
in the index below 164 provide the basis 
of a reduction in the salary or wage scale. 
Employees were granted a cost-of-living 
increase of $8.66 per month for salaried 
employees and of 5 cents per hour for 
hourly rated employees September 1, 1950, 
and one of $5.20 per month or 3 cents per 
hour March 1, 1951. Based on the above 
formula, the agreement provides for 
further cost-of-living allowances of $8.66 per 
month or 5 cents per hour effective June 1, 

1951, of $10.40 per month or 6 cents per 
hour effective September 1, 1951, and of 
$1.74 per month or one cent per hour 
effective December 1, 1951, bringing the total 
cost-of-living allowances up to $34.66 per 
month for salaried employees and to 20 
cents per hour for hourly rated employees 
for the period when the cost-of-living index 
stood between 190-0 and 191-2. 

Provision is made for seniority rights and 
grievance procedure. 

Metal Products — Oshawa, Ont. — Fittings 
Limited and United Steelworkers of 
America, Local 1817. 

Agreements to be in effect from May 1, 

1952, to April 30, 1953. Notice of ter- 
mination or of proposed revision may be 
given during March 1953, and negotiations 
upon any such proposal shall take place 
not later than the first week of April 1953. 
Any provision not so terminated or proposed 
to be revised is to remain in force pending 
such negotiations. 

Check-off: the company will deduct the 
amount of monthly union dues and special 
assessments from the pay of all employees 
eligible to be members of the union and 
remit same to the union. 

Hours: 8 per day Monday through Friday, 
a 40-hour week. Overtime: time and one- 
half for work in excess of 8 hours per day 
and for any work on Saturdays and Sundays, 
provided that if on any one week-day more 
than 4 hours overtime is worked such over- 
time will be paid for at double time: 
double time and one-half for work on 8 
specified paid holidays. 

Rest and wash-up periods: the prevailing 
rest period will be observed. Employees 
will be allowed a 5-minute wash-up period 
prior to the end of the mid-shift and at 
the end of the shift. 

Vacations ivith pay: after 3 months' ser- 
vice one week, after 3 years' service 2 
weeks with pay on the basis of 2 per cent 
and 4 per cent, respectively, of an employee's 
gross earnings during the preceding year. 

Hourly wage rates for certain classifica- 
tions: foundry division — patternmakers $1.42 
to $1.70; moulders $1.40 to $1.50, learners 
$1.28 to $1.31; lathe hands, miller hands 
$1.36 to $1.50: melter $1.38 to $1.44, crane 
operators $1.28 to $1.43, furnace repair 
$1.36 to $1.38, tap man $1.32 to $1.37. 
skimmer $1.28 to $1.37; sand mixers, board 
men, mould dump off, oventender. sorting 
and inspection, fork lift truck, general 
labour $1.28 to $1.31: maintenance division 
— fitters $1.50 to $1.70: mechanical main- 
tenance $1.32 to $1.49, helpers $1.28 to $1.31: 
stationary engineers $1.28 to $1.54, carpenter 
$1.32 to $1.39, painter $1.28 to $1.38, welder 
$1.38 to $1.49. electricians $1.42 to $1.59, 
improver $1.37 to $1.42. helper $1.22 to 



93 



$1.36; machine division — bench hands $1.50 
to $1.70, setting up taps and dies $1.38 to 
$1.42, setting up machines $1.22 to $1.32; 
machine production, adults $1.22 to $1.27, 
juniors 99 cents to $1.16; juniors and 
females to start at 99 cents and to receive 
an increase of 24, cents per hour every 6 
months until the rate of $1.16 has been 
reached. (The above rates are 6 cents per 
hour higher than the previous rates. Piece- 
workers are granted an increase in their 
hourly earnings of 4 cents per hour.) 

Off -shift differential: employees required 
to work night or swing shifts will be paid 
a shift premium of 10 per cent on their 
earned pay amount. For shifts beginning 
after 12 noon the night premium will be 
paid starting at 4 p.m. and for shifts 
beginning before 12 noon starting at 6 p.m. 
When night operations cease rates will 
return to regular schedules. In the case of 
swing shifts the 10 per cent premium will 
be paid beginning with the start of shift. 

Welfare Plan: forming part of the agree- 
ment is a Welfare Plan which provides 
(a) life insurance of $1,500 for men and 
$1,000 for women — total cost to be borne 
by the employer; (b) sickness and accident 
benefits of $25 per week for men and $20.50 
for women — total cost to be borne by the 
employer; and (c) a combined plan includ- 
ing the Blue Cross Plan for hospitalization 
benefits and the Physicians' Services 
Incorporated Plan for medical, surgical and 
obstetrical care — the cost to be borne equally 
by the individual employee and the employer. 

Seniority: other things being equal, 
seniority shall operate on a departmental 
basis. Lay-offs and re-employment will be 
based on length of service. 

Provision is made for grievance procedure 
and the safety and health of employees. 

Metal Products — T or onto, Ont. — The 
Canada Metal Company Limited 
(Toronto Division) and International 
Chemical Workers Union, Local 45S. 

Agreement to be in effect from June 2, 
1952, to June 1, 1953, and thereafter from 
year to year subject to notice. 

Check-off: voluntary but irrevocable. 

Hours: 8 per day 5 days a week, a 40- 
hour week (previous agreement provided a 
44-hour week). Overtime: time and one- 
half for work in excess of an employee's 
regular daily hours, provided the employee 
works his full scheduled work week; double 
time and one-half for work on 8 specified 
paid holidays. 

Rest and wash-up periods: all employees, 
except shift workers, will be granted one 
10-minute rest period in the forenoon and 
one 5-minute wash-up period before noon. 

Vacations with pay: after one year's ser- 
vice one week, after 2 years' service 2 
weeks, after 15 years' service 3 weeks and 
after 25 years' service 4 weeks. Employees 
with less than one year, but more than 3 
months of service will be entitled to one 
week, with pay equivalent to 2 per cent of 
their earnings. (Previous agreement pro- 
vided for one week after one year, 2 weeks 
after 2 years, and 3 weeks after 25 years 
of service.) 

Hourly wage rates for certain classifica- 
tions: oxide, mixed metal, dross depart- 
ments—lead hands $1,454 to $1.55|, No. 1 
operators $1.41 to $1,444, No. 2 operators 



$1.16 to $1.40; maintenance department — 
machinists $1.37 to $1.67, tradesmen $1.37 
to $1.62, lead hand $1.52 to $1.62, main- 
tenance men $1.42 to $1.55£; foundry and 
bushing department — lead hand $1.78 to 
$1.87, floor moulders $1,554, to $1,774, 
machine moulders $1.37 to $1.66 J, pit fire 
lead hand $1.50 to $1.55, pitman $1,444, to 
$1.49; cleaners — lead hand $1,454, to $1.55£, 
dresser finishers $1,384, to $1.50. The above 
rates include a general increase of 21 cents 
per hour granted to all hourly rated 
employees. Five cents per hour of this 
increase shall be retroactive to date when 
the 40-hour week was inaugurated in the 
different departments. 

Shift differential: employees will receive a 
shift bonus of 6 cents per hour for work 
on the 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. shift and a bonus 
of 8 cents per hour on the 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. 
shift (an increase of 3 cents per hour in 
either case over the previous shift differ- 
ential) . 

Seniority: it is mutually recognized that 
skill, ability, efficiency and good conduct 
are related to seniority standing. The 
seniority of an employee shall be considered 
in determining lay-offs, re-hirings, transfers 
and upgradings. Seniority shall be on a 
departmental basis; however, in the event 
of a lay-off due to a reduction of work or 
discontinuance of operations employees 
having a seniority standing of 18 months 
or more will receive plant-wide seniority 
privileges. 

Provision is made for grievance procedure, 
an apprenticeship plan and a Union- 
Company Safety Committee. 

Metal Products— Trail, B.C.— The Con- 
solidated Mining and Smelting Com- 
pany of Canada Limited and the 
International Union of Mine, Mill and 
Smelter Workers, Local 480. 

Agreement to be in effect from June 1, 
1952, to May 31, 1953, and thereafter, 
subject to 2 months' notice. 

Check-off: as a result of a majority 
decision of a Mediation Committee headed 
by Hon. Gordon McG. Sloan, Chief Justice 
of British Columbia, the company is obli- 
gated to deduct, effective from June 1, 
1951, from the pay of each employee, as 
a condition of his continued employment, 
the sum of $2 per month and remit same 
to the union. Under the terms of the 
present agreement, Hon. G. McG. Sloan will 
be asked whether it was his intent that any 
increase in union dues be deducted from 
the pay of non-union members and both 
parties agree to be bound by his decision. 
Each employee from whose pay the above 
amount ($2 or "a sum equivalent to union 
dues" depending on the decision of the Chief 
Justice) is deducted shall have the right to 
vote as if a member of the union in good 
standing at any election of local officers of 
the Union. Initiation fees, special union 
assessments and union dues in excess of the 
$2 (if any and subject to the decision of 
the Hon. G. McG. Sloan) will be deducted 
by the company from the pay of employees 
who so authorize; such authorization may 
be revoked at any time. 

Hours: the regular working week shall 
constitute 40 or 42 hours or the equivalent. 
Overtime: time and one-half for work in 
excess of 8 hours in any one day and for 



94 



-work on an employee's regularly assigned 
days off duty; double time and one-half for 
work on 7 specified paid holidays (previously 
double time for work on 6 paid holidays). 

Vacations ivith pay: after one year's ser- 
vice one week, after 2 years' service 2 
weeks and after 20 years' service 3 weeks. 
Employees with less than one year's ser- 
vice shall be entitled to a vacation, not 
exceeding one week, with pay amounting to 
2 per cent of wages earned during the 
previous year. For each period of 30 con- 
secutive days an employee is absent from 
work during the year, without proper cause, 
there shall be deducted from the vacation 
pay to which- he would otherwise be entitled 
one-twelfth of such pay. 

Hourly wage rates: steam engineer, 
second class $1.93, third class $1.79J, tool- 
maker $1.92$, melter $1.88$, journeyman 
tradesman $1.88, journeyman operator $1.84, 
painter $1,791, repairman, chief operator, 
special $1.79$-, first class $1.75, second class 
$1.70$; operator, special $1.66, first class 
$1.61-1, second class $1.57; helper $1.52$, 
labourer $1.48. (The above rates represent 
an increase of 10 cents per hour, except for 
tradesmen who were granted an increase of 
14 cents per hour.) 

Shift differential: a premium of 5 
(previously 4) cents per hour will be paid 
for work on the afternoon shift and of 
10 (previously 8) cents per hour for work 
on the night shift. 

Provision is made for a Safety and Indus- 
trial Hygiene Committee, seniority rights 
and grievance procedure. 

Chemical Products — Beauharnois, P.Q. — 
Dominion Tar and Chemical Company 
Limited (Dominion Alkali and Chem- 
ical Company Limited) and Interna- 
tional Chemical Workers Union, 
Local 379. 

Agreement to be in effect from May 15, 
1952, to May 15, 1953, and thereafter from 
year to year, subject to notice. 

Check-off: voluntary but irrevocable. 

Hours: for day workers — 8 per day 
Monday through Friday, 4 on Saturday, a 
44-hour week; for shift workers — 42 per 
week on the basis of a 7-day operation con- 
sisting of 8-hour shifts averaged over a 
4-week period. Overtime: time and one- 
half for work in excess of the regularly 
scheduled hours in any one day or in any 
one week and for work on Sundays, except 
where such work is part of the regularly 
scheduled shift; double time for work on 7 
specified paid holidays. Employees required 
to work 2 or more hours overtime without 
notice at least 2 hours prior to the beginning 
of their regular shift shall be given a meal 
allowance of $1 for the period from 2 to 4 
hours overtime and an additional 50 cents 
for any part of each additional 4-hour 
period of overtime. 

Vacations with pay: after one year's con- 
tinuous service one week, after 3 years' 
continuous service 2 weeks; employees with 
less than one year's service will be granted 
one-half day for each complete month of 
service. 

Hourly wage rates: production depart- 
ment — operator $1.52, rectifier operator $1.47. 
operator helper "A" and mercurv recovery 
man $1.42, operator helper "B" $1.31. 
stationary engineer $1.61, cell reconditioning 



(lead hand) $1.47, cell reconditioner $1.31; 
tank car reconditioner $1.52, helper $1.42; 
maintenance department — chief tradesman, 
stationary engineer $1.61, bulldozer and 
trackmobile operator $1.54; tradesman "A" 
$1.54, "B" $1.47, "C" $1.41, helper $1.31; 
shift serviceman $1.52, payloader operator, 
fireman, stores attendant, brakeman $1.31; 
labourer, janitor $1.22. (The above rates 
are from 6 to 8 cents per hour higher than 
the previous rates.) A starting rate of 7 
cents per hour less than the regular rate 
may be paid for not more than 2 months. 
Effective November 15, 1952, stationary 
engineers and chief tradesmen will be 
granted an increase of 2 cents, and all other 
employees an increase of one cent, per hour. 

Off -shift differential: a premium of 5 
(previously 3) cents per hour shall be paid 
for all regularly scheduled work performed 
on all shifts other than the day shifts. 

Clothing: the company agrees to make 
available, at cost, standard working cloth- 
ing in a minimum number of sizes and 
types and to replace or repair employees' 
clothing which may have been destroyed or 
damaged by causes beyond their control. 
It will also supply, free of charge, laundry 
service to employees working in the cell 
room and to any maintenance men exposed 
to mercury. 

Seniority: departmental seniority shall be 
recognized for promotions and filling of 
vacancies and plant-wide seniority for lay- 
offs and recall. 

Provision is made for grievance procedure 
and the safety and health of employees. 

Oil Refining — Vancouver, B.C. — Shell Oil 
Company of Canada Limited (Shellburn 
Refinery) and the Oil Workers' Inter- 
national Union, Local 596. 

Agreement to be in effect from September 
1, 1952, to August 31, 1953, and thereafter, 
subject to two months' notice. This agree- 
ment is similar to the one previously in 
effect (L.G., Nov., 1951, p. 1533) with the 
following changes: — 

Hourly wage rates are increased by 6^ 
per cent. _ For cleaning or doing repair 
work inside certain specified pieces of 
uncleaned refinery equipment employees will 
now be paid the regular rate plus 10 cents 
per hour instead of $1.45$ or the regular 
rate plus 5 cents per hour, as previously. 

Night-shift differential : employees will now 
receive 7 (previously 5) cents per hour for 
work between 4 p.m. and 12 midnight and 
14 (previously 8) cents per hour for work 
between 12 midnight and 8 a.m. 

Transportation and Public Utilities 

Transport Drivers — Province of Quebec — 
The Automotive Transport Association 
of the Province of Quebec and the 
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers 
of America, Local 106. 

Agreement to be in effect from October 
1, 1952, to September 30, 1953, and there- 
after from year to year, subject to 2 months' 
notice. 

Union security: maintenance of member- 
ship for all union members as of March 23. 
1949. 



95 



Check-off: the company agrees to deduct 
monthly union dues from the pay of any 
eligible employee who so authorizes. All 
employees hired on or after March 23, 
1949. shall, as a condition of employment, 
authorize the company to deduct such union 
dues. 

Hours: 10 per day Monday through Friday, 

5 on Saturday, a 55-hour week. The starting 
and stopping hours shall be mutually agreed 
upon between the employer and the union 
representatives and shall not be varied 
except with the consent of both parties. 
Overtime: time and one-half for the first 6 
hours of work in excess of the standard 
working hours in any one shift; double time 
thereafter and for work on Sundays and on 

6 specified holidays, 5 of which are paid 
holidays. Effective February 1, 1953, time 
and one-half will be paid for all work in 
excess of 10 hours Monday through Friday 
and after 5 hours on Saturday or for work 
in excess of 50 hours per week. 

Vacation with pay: employees with less 
than 3 years' continuous service shall receive 
a vacation with pay calculated at 2 per 
cent of the wages earned; employees with 
3 or more years of continuous service shall 
receive 2 weeks' vacation with pay calcu- 
lated at 4 per cent of their total earnings 
during the year in which they earned their 
vacation. 

Wages: for wage rates see under "Truck 
Drivers, Montreal" in the article "Collective 
Agreement Act Quebec" below (p. 98). The 



rates for employees at branches of the com- 
panies located outside of the Metropolitan 
area of Montreal shall be 5 cents ner hour 
lower than the rates for their respective 
classifications in the Montreal zone. 

Welfare plan: the employer shall pay the 
sum of $3.50 each calendar month for each 
eligible employee who has worked a minimum 
of 80 hours during that month, to cover the 
following benefits: (a) loss of life, natural 
death $2,000, accidental death $3,000, 
dependents up to $500; (b) dismemberment 
up to $1,000; (c) loss of time, general 
helpers $25 others $30 (per week) ; 
(d) hospital benefits, room and board up 
to $5 per day, other hospital charges up to 
$100, ambulance up to $10; (e) surgical 
benefit, maximum reimbursement $200; 
(f) medical benefit, per visit (at hospital) 
$3; (g) polio benefit, maximum reimburse- 
ment $2,500. 

Seniority: in promotions, lay-offs and 
re-hiring: (a) length of continuous ser- 
vice; (b) ability, qualifications and skill, 
and (c) family responsibilities will be 
considered in the order named. The union 
representatives shall receive favourable 
consideration as to seniority in the event 
of a lay-off due to lack of work. 

Safety: a safety campaign will be imme- 
diately inaugurated^ the union agrees to 
provide an educational, course for its 
members to develop safety. 

Provision is made for grievance procedure. 



Collective Agreement Act, Quebec 



Recent proceedings under the Collective 
Agreement Act, Quebec,* include the repeal 
of one agreement and the amendment of 
six others, all summarized below. 



*In Quebec, the Collective Agreement Act 
provides that where a collective agreement 
has been entered into by an organization of 
employees and one or more employers or 
associations of employers, either side may 
apply to the Provincial Minister of Labour 
to have the terms of the agreement which 
concern wages, hours of labour, apprentice- 
ship, and certain other conditions made 
binding throughout the province or within 
a certain district on all employers and 
employees in the trade or industry covered 
by the agreement. Notice of such applica- 
tion is published and 30 days are allowed 
for the filing of objections, after which an 
Order in Council may be passed granting 
the application with or without changes as 
considered advisable by the Minister. The 
Order in Council may be amended or 
revoked in the same manner. Each agree- 
ment is administered and enforced by a 
joint committee of the parties. References 
to the summary of this Act and to amend- 
ments to it are given in the Labour Gazette, 
January, 1949, page 65. Proceedings under 
this Act and earlier legislation have been 
noted in the Labour Gazette monthly since 
June, 1934. 



A request for the amendment of the 
agreement for retail stores at Roberval was 
published in the Quebec Official Gazette 
of October 25; another request for the 
amendment of the agreement for barbers 
and hairdressers at Rouyn and Noranda 
was gazetted October 31. Requests for the 
amendment of the agreements for the 
building trades (elevator construction sec- 
tion), for millinery workers and for the 
sheet metal fabrication industry at Mont- 
real, as well as for the clock and watch 
repair industry in some cities and towns of 
the province were gazetted November 8. 
Requests for the amendment of the agree- 
ments for truck drivers, for the building 
trades and for hospital and charitable 
institution employees at Quebec, as well 
as for the printing industry at Montreal 
were all published in the issue of 
November 15. 

Orders in Council were also published 
approving the constitution and by-laws of 
certain joint committees and others approv- 
ing the levy of assessments on the parties 
to certain agreements. 



96 



Manufacturing 

Ladies' Cloak and Suit Industry, Prov- 
ince of Quebec 

An Order in Council, dated November 6, 
and gazetted November 15, amends the 
previous Orders in Council for this industry 
(L.G., Aug., 1949, p. 987; Jan., 1950, p. 77; 
April, 1951, p. 543, and previous issues). 
Amendment to be in effect from July 1, 
1952. 

Vacation: after one year of continuous 
service, every employee is entitled to an 
annual vacation of 2 weeks with pay in- 
stead of one week as formerly; an employe*, 
with less than one year's service is entitled 
to as many whole working days (previously 
I days) as his number of months of con- 
tinuous service. If an employee's service is 
terminated, for any reason, before a year 
of continuous service, he will receive, in lieu 
of vacation with pay, a sum equal to 4 per 
cent (previously 2 per cent) of the wages 
earned by him during that portion of the 
year of continuous service spent in the 
employ of his employer between July 1 and 
June 30. 

Men's and Boys' Shirt Manufacturing 
Industry, Province of Quebec 

An Order in Council, dated November 6, 
and gazetted November 15, amends the 
previous Order in Council for this industry 
(L.G., Feb., 1952, p. 178). 

Industrial jurisdiction: as previously in 
effect this agreement applies to all employers 
engaged in manufacturing fine, sports, 
military and night shirts, as well as under- 
wear and pyjamas, for men and boys over 
14 years of age. It does not apply to the 
manufacture of garments already covered 
by an existing agreement extended under 
this Act. However, the present amendment 
now provides that effective January 1, 1953, 
this agreement also applies to shirts for boys 
of 6 to 14 years of age, and will also apply 
to work shirts, when in either case the 
manufacturing of the above garments repre- 
sents at least 25 per cent of the total 
production of an employer in the course of 
the calendar year 1952, and from year to 
year, the same conditions applying. The 
present agreement, as amended herewith, 
does not apply to underwear of knitted 
fabrics, nor to shirts, pyjamas or garments 
of any description up to and including the 
age of 6 years. 

Printing Industry, Montreal 

An Order in Council, dated October 15, 
and gazetted October 25, amends the 
previous Orders in Council for this industry 
(L.G., May, 1949. p. 604; June, 1951, 
p. 827; June, 1952, p. 780, and previous 
issues) . Another amendment to this agree- 
ment was published in the Quebec Official 
Gazette of June 7, 1952. 

Minimum hourly wage rates: a schedule 
of minimum rates for apprentices forms part 
of this amendment as follows: apprentices 
(composition ruling, cutting, etc. depart- 
ments) — from 53 cents per hour in first 
months to $1.45 in second 6 months of sixth 
year in zone I, from 46 cents to $1.18 in 
bone II and from 43 cents to $1.12 in zone 
III: apprentices (printing shops, all presses) 
— from 54 cents per hour in first 6 months 



to $1.37 in second 6 months of fourth year 
m zone 1, from 45 cents to $1.13 in zone 
II and from 40 cents to $1.04 in zone III; 
apprentices in fifth, sixth and seventh years 
on platen presses, card presses, envelope 
presses, etc. — $1.43 to $1.47 in zone I, $1.14 
to $1.17 in zone II and $1.08 to $1.11 in 
zone III; apprentices in fifth, sixth and 
seventh years on rotary presses, flat cylinder 
bed presses, etc. — $1.48 to $1.64 in zone I, 
$1.18 to $1.42 in zone II and $1.12 to $1.29 
in zone III. 

The present amendment now provides for 
a distinction between apprentices in the 
press department in zone I, II and III. 
Apprentices of the press department in 
zones II and III are now governed by 
certain regulations previously applicable to 
apprentices of the composition, ruling, 
cutting, etc. departments, only. Other pro- 
visions of this amendment include the 
revision of regulations applicable to the 
industrial jurisdiction of this agreement. 

Garages and Service Stations, Rimouski 

An Order in Council, dated October 15, 
and gazetted October 25, amends the 
previous Orders in Council for this industry 
(L.G., Jan., 1950, p. 78; Aug., 1951, p. 1108). 
Agreement to remain in effect until April 13, 
1953, and thereafter from year to year, 
subject to notice. 

Hours: regular working hours are reduced 
from 10 to 9 per day and from 60 to 54 
hours per week. Working hours are now 
distributed between 7 a.m. and 9 p.m. 
Monday through Saturday instead of 
between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m. Monday through 
Friday and on Saturday between 7 a.m. and 
6 p.m., as previously. Shift work provisions 
are included as formerly. 

Overtime: time and one -ha If for all time 
worked beyond 9 p.m. Monday through 
Saturday or for work in excess of 9| hours 
per day or 55 hours per week; time and 
one-half for work on Sundays and holidays 
when 3 or less service stations are open, 
double time when more than 3 are open. 
(Previously time and one-half for work in 
excess of 60 hours per week: double time 
for work on Sundays in accordance with the 
provisions of the Weekly Day of Rest Act 
to all employees except servicemen who were 
paid their regular rate plus 10 per cent.) 

Minimum hourly wage rates: mechanic, 
fitter, machinist, electrician, bodyman, 
wheelwright, welder, painter, upholsterer, 
glazier, vulcanizer — class "A" $1.25, class 
"B" $1.10, class "C" 90 cents per hour: 
service men and apprentices from 50 cents 
per hour in first year to 85 cents in fourth 
year. (The above rates are from 10 to 25 
cents per hour higher than those previously 
in effect.) Minimum rates for spare parts 
clerks (previously stock room clerks) are 
now 95 cents per hour for class "A", 85 
cents for class B"; apprentices from 50 to 
75 cents per hour. (Previously stock room 
clerks were paid 73 cents per hour for class 
"A". 59 cents for class "B", 49 cents for 
class "C", 33 cents and 39 cents per hour 
in first and second years respectively.) 
Minimum rates and classes of apprentices 
and spare parts clerks are limited in pro- 
portion to the total number of such workers 
employed in an establishment. Higher wages 
than the minimum rates fixed in the present 
agreement will not be reduced in any way 
for the duration of this agreement. 



97 



Cost-of-living escalator clause published in 
the Labour Gazette of August 1951, is not 
included in this amendment. 

Vacation: in addition to one week with 
pay after one year of continuous service, 
previously provided for, employees are now 
entitled to a second week with pay after 
5 years of continuous service. However, it 
is provided that although the first week will 
be given between April 1 and November 1 
of the current year (date to be fixed by 
the employer), the second week (at the 
option of the employer), may be given at 
any time of the year, or that remuneration 
equal to one week's wages or 2 per cent of 
the wages earned by the employee during 
the current year (12-month period ending 
April 1) may be given in lieu thereof. 

Transportation and Public Utilities 

Truck Drivers, Montreal 

An Order in Council, dated November 6, 
and gazetted November 8, amends the 
previous Orders in Council for this industry 
(L.G., Sept., 1948, p. 995; Aug., 1949, p. 989; 
April, 1951, p. 547; Feb., 1952, p. 179). 

Overtime: effective from February 1, 1953, 
time and one-half will be paid for all work 
in excess of 10 hours per day, Monday 
through Friday, and after 5 hours on Satur- 
day, or in excess of 50 hours per week. 
Overtime allowed after 10 hours per day or 
5 hours on Saturday is not to be included 
in calculating overtime in excess of the 
weekly work. Overtime rates on Saturday 
for furniture moving operations will be paid 
at the rate of time and one-half for the 
first 10 hours. No provision is made in this 
amendment for any revision of the regula- 
tions previously providing double time for 
work on Sundays or any of 6 specified holi- 
days (5 of which are paid holidays). 

Minimum hourly wage rates for a standard 
work week unchanged at 55 hours per week: 
junior helpers starting at 45 cents per hour 
are paid 50 cents after 6 months; helpers 
(general) from 73 cents to 83 cents after 6 
months; dockmen, warehousemen, checkers 
from 87 cents to 97 cents after 6 months; 
chauffeurs, chauffeur (semi-trailer) from 88 
and 93 cents to $1.03 and $1.08 respectively, 
after 6 months. (The above rates after 6 
months for helpers (general), dockmen, ware- 
housemen, checkers are 5 cents per hotir 
higher than those previously in effect and 
the rates for chauffeurs and chauffeurs 
(semi-trailers) are 10 cents per hour higher; 
other rates are unchanged.) 

Vacation: one week with pay after one 
year of continuous service as previously 
provided for. This amendment now pro- 
vides for 2 weeks' vacation with pay or 4 
per cent of total earnings of the year which 
entitles them to the vacation, after 3 or 
more years of continuous service. (Pre- 
viously 2 weeks with pay after 3 or more 
years of service but the second week could 
be cancelled, upon mutual agreement between 
employer and employee, provided the 
employee received compensation equal to 2 
per cent of wages earned.) 



Other provisions include regulations gov- 
erning eligibility of employees to insurance 
and to holidays with pay. 

Longshoremen, Checkers and Coopers 
(Ocean and Inland Navigation), 
Sorel 

An Order in Council, dated October 8, 
and gazetted October 31, amends the 
previous Order in Council for this industry 
(L.G., April 1951, p. 547). The names of 2 
additional stevedoring companies are added 
to the list of contracting parties. The 
present agreement, as amended, will remain 
in effect until January 31, 1953, and there- 
after from year to year, subject to notice. 

Overtime: double time (previously time 
and one-half), for work done on Sundays 
or any of 5 specified holidays; time and 
one-half for work on Saturday between 
1 p.m. and 6 p.m. (the last provision is 
added). Other overtime provisions which 
remain unchanged include time and one-half 
for work during meal hours, and double 
time after 6 p.m. and for work on Sundays 
or any of 5 specified holidays for workers 
engaged in the handling of explosives. 

Minimum hourly wage rates: for loading 
grain — $1.38 for work between 7 a.m. and 
6 p.m.; $2.07 for work between 7 p.m. and 

6 a.m.; for unloading grain out of lake and 
ocean vessels into the eleyator — $1.28 per 
hour between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m.; $1.53 per 
hour between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m.; for loading 
or unloading of cargoes not otherwise speci- 
fied from or to vessels and/or railroad cars, 
cleaning or bunkering of vessels and erection 
of grain fitting — $1.33 for work between 

7 a.m. and 6 p.m.; $1.99| for work between 
7 p.m. and 6 a.m.; for loading or unloading 
of vessels and/or railroad cars and cleaning 
same from sulphur, china clay, potash, 
cyanamid, pitch and other similar strong 
cargoes not including phosphates — $1.48 for 
work between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m.; $2.22 for 
work between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m.; water boy 
(employed on the handling of any cargo, 
except grain) $1.23 for work between 7 a.m. 
and 6 p.m., $1.84^ for work between 6 p.m. 
and 6 a.m. (Minimum rates shown above 
for work between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. are 30-| 
cents per hour higher than those previously 
in effect; minimum rates shown above for 
work between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m. are from 
45i to 84i cents per hour higher than the 
rates formerly in effect for work done 
between midnight and 6 a.m., which rates 
were the highest of 2 separate scales of 
minimum rates formerly fixed for work 
between 7 p.m. and midnight and from 
midnight to 6 a.m. 

Service 

Hospital and Charitable Institution 
Employees, Sherbrooke 

An Order in Council, dated October 15, 
and gazetted October 25, repeals the previous 
Orders in Council for this service (L.G , 
Nov., 1944, p. 1369; Julv, 1946, p. 931; Jan.. 
1947. p. 51) from October 21, 1952. 



(Concluded from page 89) 
On the whole, office staffs share in the 
benefits won by factory personnel through 
collective bargaining. On the other hand, 



they have fewer regulations on working con- 
ditions, as these are left in most cases to the 
discretion of branch or department heads. 



Industrial Standards Acts, etc 



Recent proceedings under the Industrial 
Standards Acts, etc.* include eight new 
schedules, and the amendment of one 
other, all summarized below. 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Construction 

Carpenters, Sydney 

An Order in Council, dated October 10, 
and gazetted October 22, makes binding the 
terms of a new schedule for carpenters at 
Sydney, to be in effect from November 1, 
1952, to May 31, 1953, and thereafter until 
rescinded. 

The terms of this schedule are similar to 
those which were previously in effect and 
summarized in the Labour Gazette of 
March 1951, p. 360, with the exception of 
the following: — 

Hours are unchanged at 8 per day, 40 per 
week. However, it is now provided that 
distribution of regular hours may be 
arranged to conform to certain conditions, 
subject to mutual consent of employers and 
union. 

Minimum hourly wage rate for journey- 
men carpenters is increased from $1.40 to 
$1.80 per hour. Apprentices' rates are 
increased from 71J cents to 97 cents per 
hour in first 500 hours and from $1.26 to 
$1.63 per hour during eighth 1,000 hours. 
Employees required to work on scaffolds 50 
feet or more will receive 5 cents per hour 
extra for the first 10 feet and an addi- 
tional 10 cents per hour every 20 feet there- 
after. (The last provision is new.) 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

Construction 

Plumbers, Moncton 

An Order in Council, dated October 23, 
and gazetted November 5, makes binding 
the terms of a new schedule for the plumbing 
and pipefifeting trades in the zone comprising 
the area within a radius of 5 miles from 
the City Hall in the City of Moncton and 
including the Village of Dieppe, to be in 
effect from November 1, 1952, until Decem- 
ber 31, 1952. 

The terms of this schedule are similar to 
those which were previously in effect and 
summarized in the Labour Gazette., Decem- 
ber 1951, with the exception of the 
following: — 

Minimum hourly ivage rate for work done 
during regular working periods is increased 
from $1.25 to $1.40 per hour and for work 
done during special working periods from 
$1.33 to $1.50 per hour. Weekly hours are 
unchanged at 44 per week. 

Carpenters, Saint John 

An Order in Council, dated October 23, 
and gazetted November 5, makes binding 
the terms of a new schedule for the car- 
pentry industry within a radius of 15 miles 
from the County Court House in the City 
of Saint John, to be in effect from October 
1, 1952, until June 15. 1953. 



Hours: 8 per day, Monday through Friday, 
a 40-hour week. 

Overtime: $2.18 per hour during the first 
4 hours worked in excess of regular hours, 
or on Saturday: $2.90 per hour for all other 
overtime, and for work on Sundays or any 
of 9 specified holidays (an increase of one). 
(Overtime rates are unchanged from those 
previously in effect.) 

Minimum hourly wage rate is increased 
from $1.37 to $1.45 per hour for work 
during regular working periods. Work done 
during special working period will be pay- 
able at the rate of 8 hours' pay for 7 hours' 
work. 

Painters, Saint John 

An Order in Council, dated October 23, 
and gazetted November 5, makes binding 
the terms of a new schedule for painters, 
decorators and paperhangers in the zone 
comprising the area within a radius of 15 
miles from the County Court House in Saint 
John, to be in effect from October 15, 1952, 
until December 31, 1952. 

The terms of this schedule are similar to 
those previously in effect and published in 
the Labour Gazette, April 1952, with the 
exception of the following: — 

Minimum hourly wage rate for work done 
during a regular working period is in- 
creased from $1.15 to $1.24 per hour and 
for work done during a special working 
period from $1.28 to $1.32 per hour. Weekly 
hours remain unchanged at 40 per week. 

Specified holidays are increased from 8 
to 9. 

ONTARIO 

Construction 

Electrical Workers, Cornwall 

An Order in Council, dated October 9, 
and gazetted October 25, makes binding the 
terms of a new schedule for the electrical 



*In six provinces — Nova Scotia, New 
Brunswick, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan 
and Alberta — legislation provides that, follow- 
ing a petition from representatives of 
employers and employees in any (or speci- 
fied) industries, the provincial Minister 
charged with the administration of the Act 
may himself, or through a government 
official delegated by him, call a confer- 
ence of representatives of employers and 
employees. This conference is for the pur- 
pose of investigating and considering the 
conditions of labour in the industry and of 
negotiating minimum rates of wages and 
maximum hours of work. A schedule of 
wages and hours of labour drawn up at such 
a conference, if the Minister considers that 
it has been agreed to by a proper and 
sufficient representation of employers and 
employees, may on his recommendation be 
made binding by Order in Council in all 
zones designated by the Minister. The 
Minister may also establish an advisory 
committee for every zone to which a 
schedule applies to assist in carrying out 
the provisions of the Act and the regula- 
tions. References to the summaries of these 
Acts and to amendments to them are given 
in the Labour Gazette, August, 1951, p. 1110. 



99 



repair and construction industry in the 
Cornwall Zone, to be in effect from Novem- 
ber 4, 1952, during pleasure. 

The terms of this schedule are similar to 
those previously in effect and summarized in 
the Labour Gazette, December 1951, with 
the exception of the following:— 

Minimum hourly wage rate for work 
during regular working periods and for 
night work is increased from $1.50 to $1.65 
per hour. Weekly hours are unchanged at 
44 per week. 

Specified holidays are reduced from 8 to 
7 by the deletion of Remembrance Day. 

Plumbers, Ottawa 

An Order in Council, dated October 9, 
and gazetted October 25, makes binding the 
terms of a new schedule for the plumbing 
and heating industry at Ottawa, to be in 
effect from November 4, 1952, during 
pleasure. 

The terms of this schedule are similar to 
those which were previously in effect (L.G.. 
Jan., 1951, p. 65) with the exception of the 
following: — 

Minimum hourly wage rate is increased 
from $1.70 to $1.95 per hour. Regular hours 
are unchanged at 8 per day, 40 per week. 

Sheet Metal Workers, Ottawa 

An Order in Council, dated October 16, 
and gazetted November 1, makes binding 
the terms of a new schedule for sheet metal 
workers at Ottawa, to be in effect from 
November 11, 1952, during pleasure. 

The terms of this schedule are similar to 
those previously in effect and summarized 
in the Labour Gazette, November 1950, 
with the exception of the following: — 

Minimum hourly ivage rate is increased 
from $1.57 to $1.82 per hour for a regular 
Avork week of 40 hours. 



SASKATCHEWAN 

Construction 

Carpenters, Swift Current 

An Order in Council, dated October 17, 
and gazetted October 25 makes binding the 
terms of a new schedule for carpenters at 
Swift Current and within a radius of 5 
miles, to be in effect from November 4, 
1952, during pleasure. 

Minimum hourly wage rate for journey- 
men carpenters $1.55 per hour; for car- 
penters who are not journeymen $1.30 per 
hour. 

ALBERTA 

Manufacturing 

Garages and Service Stations, Edmonton 

An Order in Council, dated October 6, 
and gazetted October 15, amends the 
previous Orders in Council for this industry 
(L.G., Dec., 1946, p. 1779; Jan., 1951, 
p. 65). 

Hours: 8 per day, 44 per week (a reduc- 
tion of 2^ hours per week). If distribution 
of working hours fixed in this amendment is 
impractical, weekly hours may be varied to 
provide an average of 44 -hours in a period 
of 4 weeks, but in no case will the total 
hours worked in any one week exceed 48 
hours. 

Overtime: time and one-half, as previously, 
for work in excess of regular hours and on 
Sundays and specified holidays. 

Minimum hourly wage rates for mechanics 
are increased from $1.25 to $1.45 per hour 
for class AA, from $1.15 to $1.35 for class 
Al, from $1.05 to $1.25 for class A. The 
classification mechanic class B is deleted. 
Minimum rates for other employees are not 
affected bv this amendment. 



Through a suggestion of the LMPC, the 
work-flow in one section of the Robinson 
Industries Ltd., in Hamilton has been 
considerably improved. The committee 
suggested that "job run" forms for machine 
operators be posted on bulletin boards in 
advance of the time to start a new oper- 
ation. In this way, the operators could 
have a good part of the procedure for 
starting a new press job done while the 
last job was still being finished. In addi- 
tion this suggestion enabled them to know 
what type of ink to use; if it was the same 
as the preceding, unnecessary cleaning of 
presses was eliminated. The idea has also 
resulted in considerable savings in ink. 

Local 540 of the International Printing 
Pressmen and Assistants' Union of North 
America (AFL-TLC) is the bargaining 
agent participating in this LMPC. 



The Labour-Management Co-operation 
Committee (LMPC) in the Express Depart- 
ment of the CNR at Montreal is showing 
steady progress. A report in the November 
issue of The Mount Royal News (news- 
sheet of "Mount Ro3^al" Division 39 of 
the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway 
Employees and Other Transport Workers), 
under the heading "Labour-Management 
Committee Going Places," said: — 

"This Committee really is doing a job. 
In addition to a number of matters being 
attended to, there is a much better rela- 
tionship existing around the sheds these 
days. For our part, let us remember that 
co-operation works both ways. Let us do 
our part." 

The "News" also plans to run a monthly 
column on the LMPC "to summarize its 
activities or report special events in con- 
nection with its work." 



100 



Labour Law 



U.S. Amends Coal Mine Safety Act 
to Permit Closing of Unsafe Mine 

Federal inspectors, formerly without authority to enforce compliance 
with their recommendations, now have power to shut down mines where 
imminent danger of explosion, fire, flood or hoisting accident exists 



By virtue of its power to regulate 
interstate and foreign commerce, the Con- 
gress of the United States has adopted 
legislation which permits federal inspectors 
of coal mines to close down a mine when 
they find there is imminent danger of a 
major disaster or where the safety require- 
ments of the Act have not been complied 
with. State co-operation in the enforce- 
ment of the federal law is provided for. 

Where a state elects to co-operate through 
Us official mine inspection or safety agency, 
a joint inspection by the federal inspector 
and a state inspector must be made. 

The Act is designed to remove the causes 
of and prevent such major disasters as 
mine fires, explosions, inundations, or man- 
trip or man-hoist accidents. The enact- 
ment and enforcement of laws with regard 
to general accidents, and safety, health and 
welfare of mine employees are left to the 
states. 

Amendments to the Federal Coal Mine 
Safety Act, 1941, which give to the federal 
Government of the United States enforce- 
ment powers for the prevention of major 
disasters in coal mines were signed by 
President Truman on July 16. Under the 
amending Act, federal inspectors, who 
formerly had no authority to enforce com- 
pliance with their recommendations for 
mine safety, now have power to shut down 
a mine and may do so where there is 
imminent danger of a mine explosion, fire, 
inundation or man-trip or man-hoist acci- 
dent or where there is a continued violation 
of the safety provisions now contained in 
the Act. A major disaster, as classified by 
the United States Bureau of Mines, is one 
in which five or more persons are killed. 

History and Background 

Until the passage of these amendments, 
the enforcement of mine safety laws was 
a matter left solely to the states. The 29 



This section, prepared by the Legisla- 
tion Branch, reviews labour laws as the3^ 
are enacted by Parliament and the 
provincial legislatures, regulations under 
these laws, and selected court decisions 
affecting labour. 



coal-mining states have a great number of 
regulations affecting the safety of coal 
miners but the power given to inspectors 
for obtaining compliance with the regula- 
tions varies greatly. 

The 1941 federal Act, applicable to 
mines the products of which regularly enter 
interstate commerce, authorized inspection 
of coal mines by the Secretary of the 
Interior, acting through the Bureau of 
Mines, for the purpose of obtaining in- 
formation relating to the safety and health 
of workers in the mines, the causes of 
accidents involving bodily injury or loss of 
life and the causes of occupational diseases 
originating in the mines. 

The Secretary is required to submit an 
annual report to Congress on the informa- 
tion he has obtained and to make recom- 
mendations with respect to any legislative 
action which he considers necessary. The 
Act also authorizes the publishing of studies 
concerning the promotion of health and 
safety and the prevention of accidents in 
coal mines. The Act as passed in 1941, 
however, did not require the mine oper- 
ators to comply with the standards or 
recommendations of the Secretary. 

In administering the Act, provision was 
made for co-operation between the Sec- 
retary of the Interior and the official mine 
inspection or safety agencies of the states. 

Following the disaster in 1947 at the 
Centralia coal mine in Illinois in which 111 
miners were killed through an explosion of 
highly combustible coal dust, Congress 
passed an Act requesting that the coal 



101 



operators and state mining agencies report 
on the extent of compliance with safety 
standards developed by the federal Bureau 
of Mines. It was found that in 1946-47 
only 25 per cent of the Bureau's recom- 
mendations were complied with. During 
1950-1951, 6,360 mines were inspected and 
more than 121,000 violations of the Federal 
Mine Safety Code were reported but only 
27 per cent of the inspectors' recommenda- 
tions were carried out. 

After a series of disasters in 1951, chief 
of which was the explosion of West Frank- 
fort, 111., in which 119 coal miners were 
killed, the Secretary of the Interior recom- 
mended to Congress the passage of legisla- 
tion embodying compulsory federal safety 
regulations and giving the Secretary of the 
Interior authority to shut down dangerous 
mines. Accordingly, the 1952 amendments 
to the Federal Coal Mine Safety Act were 
passed. 

1952 Amendments 

The 1952 amendments add a new section 
to the statute (Title II — Prevention of 
Major Disasters in Mines). They enact 
into law safety provisions which coal oper- 
ators are required to comply with in order 
to eliminate the causes of major disasters. 
Some of these basic causes are excessive 
accumulations of loose coal, coal dust and 
other combustible materials; accumulations 
of explosive gases; inadequate precautions 
in extending underground working areas 
towards abandoned workings in which water 
may be impounded; and unsafe hoisting 
equipment and travelways by which men 
are transported to working places in the 
mine. 

The safety provisions therefore provide 
for determining whether or not a mine is 
a gaseous mine and lay down definite 
requirements with respect to proper venti- 
lation, rock-dusting, permissible electrical 
equipment, fire protection, adequate roof 
support in the travelways and hoisting. In 
cases of non-compliance with these provi- 
sions, a mine-closing order may be issued 
by a federal coal mine inspector. 

It is to be noted that, under the amend- 
ing Act, the jurisdiction of the federal 
Government is limited to a small part of 
the whole field of coal mine safety. The 
amendments seek to ensure that employees 
will be provided with a safe place in which 
to work and to eliminate the causes of 
disaster over which mine workers have no 
control. The states retain responsibility 
for enacting and administering proper laws 
for the prevention of accidents arising from 



human failure, in which it is estimated that 
90 per cent of fatalities in the coal mining 
industry occur. 

According to the report of the Com- 
mittee on Education and Labour to the 
House of Representatives on the amend- 
ments to the Act, 

the Bill is not designed to prevent the 
day-to-day accidents which occur in the 
mine industry nor for the general health 
and welfare of the miners. This large 
field is left to the co-operative efforts 
between the federal Bureau, the state 
agencies, employers and employees. The 
enforcement of rules and regulations 
in the field of day-to-day accidents, 
safety, health and welfare is clearly left 
within the jurisdiction of the several 
states. 

No state or territorial law in effect or 
which may be enacted in future will be 
superseded by the federal Act unless its 
provisions conflict with the Act. Further- 
more, any provisions of a state law which 
provide for greater safety of persons 
engaged in coal mining operations than do 
the provisions of the federal Act will 
prevail. State workmen's compensation 
laws are not superseded in any way. 

State Co-operation 

Provision is made for state co-operation 
in carrying out and enforcing compliance 
with the federal law. A state which desires 
to co-operate in making mine inspections 
is required to have a state plan approved 
by the Director of the Bureau of Mines 
designating the responsible state agency, 
giving assurances that a competent inspec- 
tion staff will be available to participate 
in inspections and making provision for 
reports to be furnished to the Director. 

After a state plan has been approved, a 
mine inspection may not be made in that 
state by a federal inspector unless a state 
inspector participates, except where an 
inspection is urgently necessary to deter- 
mine whether or not there is danger of an 
immediate disaster and state participation 
would cause delay. 

Annual Inspection 

The Act requires an inspector of the 
federal Bureau of Mines to make an 
annual inspection of every mine of which 
the products regularly enter interstate or 
foreign commerce or the operations of 
which substantially affect such commerce. 
(Strip mines and mines in which no more 
than 14 persons are regularly employed 
underground are exempted.) An annual 
inspection is the minimum requirement and 
further inspections may be made as the 
Director deems necessarv. 



102 



Mine-closing Orders 

If, on inspecting a mine, a federal 
inspector discovers that there is imminent 
danger of a mine explosion, fire, inunda- 
tion or man-trip or man-hoist accident, he 
must determine the extent of the area in 
which the danger is present and order all 
persons to be withdrawn from the area. 

If the inspector finds that one of the 
mine safety provisions of the Act is being 
violated without there being any indica- 
tion of immediate danger, he must set a 
reasonable time-limit during which the 
operator must have the condition remedied. 
This period may be extended if circum- 
stances warrant it. A special inspection 
must be carried out when the period of 
time allowed, or an extended period, 
expires or whenever a mine operator 
requests a special inspection. The in- 
spector must then determine whether a 
further time extension may be made or 
he may close down the dangerous section 
of the mine. 

If a mine-closing order is issued because 
of imminent danger in a mine in a state 
in which a state plan is in effect and a 
state inspector did not participate in the 
inspection on which the order is based, 
the operator of the mine may request the 
state agency to have the mine inspected. 
However, the mine remains closed regard- 
less of the findings of the state inspector. 

In such a state a mine cannot be closed 
because of continued violation of the mine- 
safety provisions of the Act unless a state 
inspector agrees. If he does not agree, 
either he, the operator or the federal 
inspector may apply within 24 hours after 
the inspection for the appointment of an 
independent inspector by the chief judge 
of the United States District Court for 
the district. The independent inspector 
must inspect the mine within five days 
after his appointment. If, after this in- 
spection, either the independent inspector 
or the state inspector concurs in the mine- 
closing order, it must be issued. Notice 
of any finding or order must be posted on 
the bulletin board of the mine. 

Appeals 

Provision is made for a coal mine oper- 
ator to appeal a mine-closing order either 
to the Director of the Bureau of Mines 
or to the Federal Coal Mine Safety Board 
or Review. 

When the Director receives an applica- 
tion for review of a mine-closing order, 
he must himself re-inspect the mine or 
have a special inspection carried out by 
three federal inspectors other than the 



inspector who originally issued the closing 
order. After inspecting the mine or on 
receiving the inspection report, the Director 
must issue an order annulling, revising or 
affirming the original closing order. An 
order of the Director may be appealed to 
the Board. 

In a state where a state plan is in effect 
the appeal must be made to the Board of 
Review set up under the Act. The Board 
is an independent tribunal composed of 
three members appointed for a three-year 
period by the President with the advice 
and consent of the Senate. One member 
must represent the viewpoint of coal mine 
operators, another the viewpoint of workers 
and the third member, the chairman, must 
be a graduate engineer with experience in 
the coal mining industry or at least five 
years' experience as a practical mining 
engineer in the industry. 

The Board is required to fix a time for 
a prompt hearing of an appeal. In the 
meantime the mine operator may request 
the . Board to grant temporary relief from 
the order and the Board may grant such 
relief after it holds a heaving at which both 
the applicant and the Director are heard. 
The Board is not bound by any previous 
findings of fact made by the Director or 
a coal mine inspector and may take 
evidence from both parties. The burden 
of proof rests upon the Director. The 
findings and orders issued by the Board 
must be in writing and must bear the 
signatures of the members who concur. 

The Act provides that any final order 
issued by the Board revising, affirming or 
annulling the original order is subject to 
review by the United States Court of 
Appeals if notice of appeal is filed within 
30 days after the date of the order. 
Pending the hearing of the appeal, the 
Court may postpone the effective date of 
the final order or grant other appropriate 
relief. The Court must hear the appeal on 
the record made before the Board and 
permit argument by both parties. The 
decision of the Court of Appeals is final, 
subject only to review by the United States 
Supreme Court. 

Gassy Mines 

The Act also authorizes a federal in- 
spector to issue an order requiring a mine 
operator to comply with the mine safety 
provisions which govern the operation of 
gassy mines. Such an order is issued when 
the inspector finds that methane has been 
ignited in the mine or that methane gas 
is present in an amount of 0-25 per cent 
or more in any open workings when tested 



103 



by recognized means of accurately detect- 
ing the gas at a point not less than 12 
inches from the roof, face or rib. An 
operator who does not agree with the 
inspector's finding has the option of appeal- 
ing either to the Director or to the Board 
of Review for an annulment of the order. 

Mine Safety Provisions 

Every mine operator and every person 
on the mine premises must comply with 
the safety provisions of the Act. In 
general, these provisions may be summar- 
ized as follows: — 

They contain special provisions which 
must be complied with in a mine classified 
by state law as a gassy mine or where the 
federal inspector has found dangerous 
amounts of methane gas. 

They seek to safeguard workers against 
accumulations of explosive gas by adequate 
ventilation and sealing of abandoned 
workings. 

They require regular examinations of all 
underground areas. 

They require accumulations of coal dust 
ot be covered with inert rock dust so that 
the combined coal dust and rock dust will 
not explode or burn. 

They provide that electrical machinery 
must be of an approved type so as to 
prevent sparks from igniting an explosive 
mixture of air. 

They require bore-holes to be drilled in 
advance of the working place when 
approaching abandoned workings which 
may contain dangerous accumulations of 
water. 

They provide that hoists must be 
equipped with safety brakes and safety 
catches and must be inspected daily. 

They prescribe fire prevention precau- 
tions. 

Ventilation 

The active underground working places 
must be ventilated by a current of air 
containing not less than 19-5 per cent 
oxygen, not more than 0-5 per cent carbon 
dioxide and no harmful quantities of other 
noxious gases. Its volume and velocity 
must be sufficient to dilute, so as to render 
harmless, and to carry away harmful gases. 
Special provisions apply to ventilation in 
bituminous coal, lignite and anthracite 
mines. Precautions must be taken to 
ensure that the air does not contain more 
than one per cent methane gas. 

In a gassy mine air may not be used for 
ventilation purposes if it has passed 
through abandoned workings which are 
inaccessible for inspection or if it has been 
used to ventilate a pillar line or an area 



from which pillars have been removed. 
However, if compliance with this section 
is impossible, the mine may continue to 
be operated for a reasonable time until, 
with future mine development, ventilation 
can be changed to comply with this provi- 
sion. In no case, however, may air be 
used to ventilate the mine if it contains 
more than one per cent methane. 

Examinations for Gas and Other Hazards 

A thorough inspection must be carried 
out in a gassy mine within the four-hour 
period before each shift begins. Each 
person designated to make the examina- 
tion must be assigned to a definite under- 
ground area and must inspect every active 
working face, testing with a permissible 
flame safety lamp for accumulation of 
methane and oxygen deficiency; examine 
seals and doors; inspect and test roof, face, 
and rib conditions; inspect travelways, 
approaches to abandoned workings and 
accessible falls in active sections for explo- 
sive gas and other hazards; and determine 
whether the air in each split is travelling 
in its proper course and in normal volume. 

If, during the inspection, the mine exam- 
iner finds a dangerous condition, he must 
post a danger sign conspicuously at a point 
where it will prevent persons from entering 
the danger area. The mine examiner must 
place his initials and the date near the face 
of each place examined. After the exam- 
ination is completed, the mine examiner 
must report the results to a designated 
person before the shift begins and must 
also record his report in a book kept at 
the surface. No person may enter an under- 
ground area in a gassy mine, except during 
a coal-producing shift, unless an examina- 
tion has been carried out within the 
previous 12 hours. 

In non-gassy mines a similar examination 
must be made at least once a day. The 
daily examination must be made within the 
four hours preceding the beginning of the 
first coal-producing shift. 

In addition, at least once during each 
shift the underground workings of all mines 
must be examined for hazards. In gassy 
mines this examination must include tests 
for oxygen deficiency and methane. 

In a gassy mine, all workings which are 
abandoned after July 16 or the date on 
which the mine became a gassy mine, 
whichever date is later, must be sealed or 
ventilated. 

Rock-Dusting 

Coal dust, loose coal and other com- 
bustible materials must not be permitted 
to accumulate in dangerous quantities in 



104 



active underground workings. Except in 
anthracite mines, if underground mining 
operations raise an excessive amount of 
dust, water or another effective method 
may be used to allay the dust at its source. 
All underground mines, except those in 
which the dust is too wet or too high in 
incombustible content to cause an explo- 
sion, must be rock-dusted to within 40 feet 
of all faces. Where rock dust is applied, 
the incombustible content of the combined 
coal dust, rock dust and other dust must 
not be less than 65 per cent. Rock- 
dusting is not required in anthracite mines, 
because anthracite coal dust is not 
explosive. 

Electrical Equipment 

All electric face equipment used in a 
gassy mine must be approved by the 
Director unless the equipment was in use 
before the Act went into force or before 
the mine became a gassy mine, whichever 
date is later. 

Fire Prevention 

Suitable and adequate fire-fighting equip- 
ment must be provided for each mine. 
After blasting operations are carried out, 
an examination for fire must be made. 
Underground storage places used for storing 
more than two days' supply of lubricating 
oil and grease must be of fireproof con- 
struction. Oil and grease kept in face 
regions or other underground working 
places must be stored in portable, closed, 
metal containers. All underground struc- 
tures installed after the Act is in force 
must be fireproof. 

Welding, cutting or soldering with arc 
or flame in underground regions in other 
than a fireproof enclosure must be done 
under direct supervision of a qualified 
person who must test for methane before 
and during such operations in gassy mines 
and must make a thorough search for fire 
after these operations have been carried 
out in any mine. Rock dust or suitable 
fire extinguishers must be immediately 
available during welding, cutting or solder- 
ing operations. 

Smoking is forbidden underground in a 
gassy mine and persons are not permitted 
to carry smoking materials, matches or 
lighters underground. Only authorized 
electric lamps may be used in a gassy mine 
for portable illumination. Black blasting 
powder may not be stored or used under- 
ground in a mine. However, until January 
16, 1953, this prohibition does not apply 
to a mine in which the storage and handling 
of such powder is expressly permitted by 
state statute. Mud caps and other uncon- 



fined shots must not be fired underground. 
Under specified conditions this restriction 
does not apply to anthracite mines. 

Protection against Mine Inundation 

Where a working place in an under- 
ground mine approaches within 50 feet of 
abandoned workings as shown by surveys 
made by a competent engineer, or within 
200 feet of other abandoned workings 
which cannot be inspected and which may 
contain dangerous accumulations of water 
or gas, or within 200 feet of the workings 
of an adjacent mine, bore-holes must be 
drilled to a distance of at least 20 feet in 
advance of the face of the working place. 

Roof Support 

In order to prevent man-trip accidents, 
the roof and ribs of all active underground 
roadways and travelways must be ade- 
quately supported. 

Hoisting 

Hoists used for transporting persons at a 
mine, except hoists used in excavating 
shafts or slopes, must be equipped with 
overspeed, overwind and automatic stop 
controls, unless a second engineer is on 
duty. Such hoists must be equipped with 
brakes capable of stopping the cage when 
fully loaded and have a cable sufficiently 
strong to sustain the fully loaded platform 
with a proper margin of safety. 

Cages used to transport persons in vertical 
shafts, unless they are also used to transport 
coal, must be equipped with safety catches 
w r hich will act effectively in an emergency. 
Such safety catches must be tested every 
two months. Hoists used for transporting 
persons must be inspected daily. 

Administrative Provisions 

The Act permits the Director to deter- 
mine whether the construction of any 
equipment conforms to specifications which 
are designed to ensure that the equipment 
will not cause a mine fire or explosion. If 
the equipment conforms to such specifica- 
tions, the manufacturer is authorized to 
attach to it a label indicating that it has 
been approved. 

No person may act as federal mines 
inspector unless he has the basic qualifica- 
tion of at least five years' practical experi- 
ence in coal mining and is recognized by 
the Bureau as having the training or 
experience of a practical mining engineer. 

An appropriation not exceeding three 
million dollars is set aside for administer- 
ing the new provisions of the Act. 



105 



Penalties 

A maximum penalty of $2,000 is pro- 
vided for a mine operator, agent or any 
person who knows that a mine-closing order 
has been made and who fails to comply 
with the order. Any owner, lessee, agent, 



manager or other person who has control 
or supervision of a coal mine who refuses 
to admit the Director or authorized repre- 
sentative of the Bureau, a state inspector 
assigned in accordance with a state plan 
or an independent inspector appointed 
under the Act may be fined up to $500. 



Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 

British Columbia Appeal Court upholds contempt of court conviction 
of IWA picketers. Appeal case in Quebec deals with use of injunction 
in labour dispute in textile industry. Injured worker loses action 
for damages against employer in another Quebec case. Newfoundland 
magistrate finds fish products firm guilty of unfair labour practices 

An appeal against the judgment of the British Columbia Supreme Court 
in which Tony Poje and other IWA members were found guilty of contempt 
of court for disobeying an anti-picketing injunction has been dismissed by the 
British Columbia Appeal Court. In Quebec, a textile company has won its 
appeal against an injunction obtained by the union to prohibit changes in work 
load during contract negotiations. 

In a Quebec Superior Court action brought by a die maker injured by an 
automatic press it was held that the employer had fulfilled his obligation in 
warning the employee of the danger and supplying him with proper tools. He 
was held not negligent in permitting the man to test the die on a press that 
was not equipped with a guard. 

A Newfoundland employer prosecuted for unfair labour practices was 
fined $400 in the Magistrate's Court at Harbour Grace. 



British Columbia Appeal Court . . . 

. . . dismisses appeal by members of woodworkers' 
union against conviction for contempt of court 

The British Columbia Appeal Court on 
October 7 dismissed the appeal by an 
officer of the International Woodworkers 
of America (CIO-CCL) and 14 union 
members from the judgment convicting 
them of contempt of court for their defiance 
of an anti-picketing injunction issued 
during the lumber strike. The British 
Columbia Supreme Court had imposed a 
sentence of a $3,000 fine and a three-month 
prison term on the union leader and a 
$300 fine on each of the others (L.G., 
Nov., 1952, p. 1489). 

Mr. Justice Smith and Mr. Justice Bird 
gave reasons for the judgment of the Court, 
while Mr. Justice O'Halloran gave a 
dissenting opinion. 

Counsel for the union members appealed 
from the contempt of court judgment on 
the ground that the injunction order which 
the men had defied was a nullity that 



could be ignored because it was based on 
inadequate evidence, was contrary to the 
British Columbia Trade-unions Act, and 
because it was issued in permanent form. 
He maintained that the injunction order 
was contrary to Section 3 of the Act, which 
provides that no trade union or its officers, 
members or agents may be enjoined for the 
mere communication of facts concerning 
employment and for peaceful persuasion. 
He argued also that in accordance with 
the statute regulating ex parte injunctions 
the practice of the court is never to grant 
a perpetual injunction before trial. 

Mr. Justice Smith and Mr. Justice Bird 
both emphasized that the order of a 
superior court is never a nullity but has 
full force until reversed or amended on 
appeal to a higher court. While these 
objections to the injunction might be 
grounds for an appeal, they were no basis 
for the argument that a person may with 
impunity ignore a court order which stands 
unchallenged. Mr. Justice Smith termed 
"entirely novel and against principle" the 



106 



idea that an order should be a nullity 
because founded on insufficient evidence. 
Similarly, the argument that a court acts 
without jurisdiction when it errs in matters 
of statute law was, in his opinion, clearly 
contrary to authority and principle. 

A second argument presented by counsel 
for the appellants was that the Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court who had 
found the men guilty of contempt of court 
was not entitled to take contempt pro- 
ceedings on his own motion, as he had 
done. The shipping company, which had 
moved on July 23 to commit certain of 
the picketers for contempt of court for 
their defiance of the injunction, withdrew 
its motion on July 24 after a settlement 
had been reached with the woodworkers' 
union. The Chief Justice then initiated 
contempt proceedings himself. 

Mr. Justice Smith held that the court 
may always intervene in such a case where 
its prestige is affected. Although disobedi- 
ence to an injunction is generally considered 
an injury to the party who obtained it, it 
is also a challenge to the court, His Lord- 
ship stated. In this case the disobedience 
was not from negligence but deliberate and, 
therefore, constituted contumacious con- 
tempt of court. In His Lordship's words: — 

The way the injunction was received was 
a direct challenge to the court's powers. 
After it had been served on the union's 
officer, Poje, he continued not only to 
picket, but to picket with numbers that 
- are very suggestive ; _ in fact, they pan 
only be given a sinister interpretation. 
The primary object was undoubtedly to 
overawe the longshoremen but even for 
that they were extravangantly excessive. 
On one occasion there were something like 
190, on another between 60 and 70, on 
another more than 50. This clearly points 
to an attempt to impress the public with 
the power of the union and the size of its 
resources. A threat of force was inherent 
in the very numbers. 

Mr. Justice Bird shared the ' view that 
the picketers' conduct was a challenge to 
the authority of the court carrying the 
implied assertion that the union and its 
members stood above the law. He also 
held that the Chief Justice had acted 
properly in taking contempt proceedings. 
Both judges cited cases as authority for 
the court's action. 

Counsel for the union members raised 
several objections to the procedure 
followed by the Chief Justice, claiming 
among other things that no specific charge 
relating to the alleged contempt was made 
against his clients and that they were not 
given an opportunity to make a full 
defence. 



Both Mr. Justice Smith and Mr. Justice 
Bird considered that there had been no 
impropriety in the Court's procedure. 
Where a judge acts of his own motion, the 
normal court rules do not apply, they held. 

Although no formal charge was made 
against the union members, and no formal 
notice of the alleged contempt was given 
them before the writs were issued ordering 
them to appear in court, they had full 
knowledge of the charge against them since 
their counsel appeared in court on July 29 
when the sheriff gave his evidence. Their 
counsel did have a chance to present their 
defence and he did give evidence on behalf 
of two of the men charged, who were 
subsequently acquitted. He admitted that 
the sheriff's evidence 'against the 14 others 
was correct, offered an apology to the Court 
on their behalf and asked for leniency. 

For the reasons stated, the Court 
dismissed the appeal and upheld the judg- 
ment of Chief Justice Farris. 

Mr. Justice O'Halloran, dissenting from 
the judgment of the Court, held that the 
question whether the contempt was of a 
civil or criminal kind was a determining 
factor in deciding whether the appeal 
should be upheld. He considered that the 
contempt proceedings were civil because 
they arose out of a civil action. 

In His Lordship's view, the sentence 
imposed for contempt of court would be 
appropriate only if the contempt were of 
a criminal nature. He referred to Seward 
v. Paterspn [1897], a case relied upon in 
the Supreme Court as a precedent for 
finding persons guilty of contempt for 
aiding and abetting in the breach of an 
injunction although they were not per- 
sons named in the injunction order. He 
pointed out that in that case the offence 
was undoubtedly criminal contempt 
because it was a breach of a perpetual 
injunction issued after a full hearing at 
the trial. He held that in the case at 
bar the union leader would have to be 
found guilty of criminal contempt before 
the other 14 union members could be 
convicted of contempt as aiders and 
abettors. 

Mr. Justice O'Halloran then examined 
Poje's conduct to determine whether it 
could be considered criminal contempt of 
court. He had not interfered with the 
sheriff, and no charges of threats, abuse, 
violence or clear intimidation had been 
proved against him. The main complaint 
against him was that as picket captain he 
went up to a car of longshoremen and 
asked "Are j'ou fellows longshoremen?" to 
which they replied "Yes, are we going to 



107 



load?'' and Poje said "No sir, no sir." 
His Lordship considered that the nature 
of conversation indicated that an agree- 
ment had probably been reached by officials 
of the two unions. He also stated that it 
was not to be expected that members of 
the longshoremen's union would load the 
ship if even one picket remained there 
and, in fact, their agreement with their 
employer stipulated that they did not have 
to cross a picket line. For these reasons 
Mr. Justice O'Halloran considered that 
Poje had carried on communication with- 
out intimidation and so had not exceeded 
the limits of legal picketing. The same 
thing was true of the other 14 appellants. 

In considering the appellants' claim that 
the injunction order was made without 
jurisdiction and was therefore a nullity, 
Mr. Justice O'Halloran dealt further with 
the problem of whether or not the picket- 
ing was legal. The injunction prohibited 
"watching and besetting," a term which is 
now generally accepted as synonymous with 
peaceful and orderly picketing, His Lord- 
ship stated. In his opinion it was estab- 
lished by the majority judgment of the 
Supreme Court of Canada in R. Williams 
et al v. Aristocratic Restaurants (L.G., 1951, 
p. 1553) that Sections 3 and 4 of the British 
Columbia Trade-unions Act prohibit the 
issuing of an injunction (even temporary 
before trial) to restrain peaceful and orderly 
picketing. He concluded therefore, since 
the injunction order in this case was against 
peaceful picketing, that it was without 
jurisdiction on its face and that the 
picketers had reason for so regarding it. 

Mr. Justice O'Halloran stated that Chief 
Justice Farris in his reasons for judgment 
seemed to have taken it for granted that 
the conduct of the men if pursuing peaceful 
picketing was in itself an offence, because 
it occurred during a strike which he con- 
sidered illegal. Mr. Justice O'Halloran said 
he had held the same view in principle 
until the reasoning of the Supreme Court 
of Canada in the Aristocratic Restaurants 
case, where the picketing was held to be 
legal although it occurred when there was 
no strike, where no members of the union 
were employed in the restaurants, and the 
restaurants suffered considerable loss from 
the picketing. He referred also to the 
judgment of the Ontario High Court in 
General Dry Batteries of Canada Limited 
v. Brigenshaw (L.G., Feb., 1952, p. 188). 
He stated, moreover,, that the question 
whether the lumber strike was illegal or 
not could not be determined by any court 
until a full hearing was held at which the 



union had ample opportunity to bring 
evidence. His Lordship concluded, there- 
fore, that the picketing was legal. 

Mr. Justice O'Halloran held that, once 
it was decided that the contempt was of 
a civil and not a criminal kind, then the 
judgment of the Supreme Court, which 
treated it as a criminal contempt, must 
fall automatically. He was convinced from 
the language of Chief Justice Farris' 
reasons for judgment that it had been dealt 
with as a criminal contempt. The pro- 
cedure followed in issuing writs of attach- 
ment without notice also indicated that 
the Court had considered the offence 
criminal contempt. 

In Mr. Justice O'Halloran's view, the 
impropriety of the procedure was another 
ground for allowing the appeal. He 
emphasized that the process of committal 
or attachment must be carried out in strict 
accordance with court rules because it 
affects the liberty of the subject. He con- 
sidered also that- the court's jurisdiction to 
initiate contempt proceedings should be 
exercised only where the case is clear 
beyond all reasonable doubt and that in 
other cases a judge should leave the 
matter of prosecution to the Attorney 
General. 

Further, Mr. Justice O'Halloran was of 
the opinion that the appellants had not 
been adequately charged. If the offence 
were criminal contempt, and that of aiding 
and abetting in a criminal contempt, they 
should have been specifically charged as 
soon as they were brought before the Court 
on September 15. They should also have 
been informed of the consequences if the 
charge against them were proved and their 
counsel should have been given full oppor- 
tunity to explain the legal points he sought 
to raise. His Lordship was of the opinion 
that when the appellants' counsel gave an 
apology on their behalf he did not know 
that the charge was criminal contempt. 

For these reasons, Mr. Justice O'Halloran 
would have allowed the appeal of Poje 
and the 14 other union members. Cana- 
dian Transport (U.K.) Limited v. Alsbury 
et al, [1952] 7 WWR (NS) 49. 

Quebec Court of Queen's Bench, Appeal Side . . . 

. . . dissolves injunction prohibiting textile firm 
from changing work conditions while negotiating 

The Quebec Court of Queen's Bench, 
Appeal Side, in Montreal on June 27, 1952, 
allowed the appeal of a textile company 
from a Superior Court judgment granting 
a union's application for an interim injunc- 
tion to restrain the company from changing 
certain conditions of employment. The 



108 



Court of Queen's Bench held that the union 
had not established that a right was being 
violated or that any serious injury would 
be suffered as a result of the company's 
action. 

The change in conditions of employment 
initiated on January 14, 1952, by the 
employer, Dominion Textile Company 
Limited, in its plant at Magog, was to 
assign three looms instead of one to each 
worker. As a result, 20 employees were 
no longer required to operate looms. 
Their union, the Syndicat Catholique des 
Ouvriers du Textile de Magog, Inc., applied 
for and obtained an interim injunction to 
prohibit the change. The union claimed 
that the employer's action violated Section 
24 (1) of the Quebec Labour Relations Act, 
which reads:— 

Any strike or lockout is prohibited so 
long as an association of employees has 
not been recognized as representing the 
group of employees concerned, and so long 
as such association has not taken the 
required proceedings for the making of a 
collective agreement and fourteen days 
have not elapsed since the receipt by the 
Minister of Labour of a report of the 
council of arbitration upon the dispute. 
Until the above conditions have been 
fulfilled, an employer shall not change the 
conditions of employment of his employees 
without their consent. 

Mr. Justice Bissonnette gave reasons for 
the Court's decision to allow the company's 
appeal and dissolve the injunction. Three 
other judges concurred with him, while Mr. 
Justice Gagne gave a dissenting opinion. 

Mr. Justice Bissonnette pointed out that 
in dealing with an application for an 
injunction it is not the function of the 
court to determine the issues of the case 
but only to decide whether an injunction 
should be issued. In this case it was not 
necessary to interpret the terms of the 
collective agreement or the intent of Sec- 
tion 24 of the Labour Relations Act. He 
referred to Article 957 of the Code of Civil 
Procedure, which lists the conditions under 
which an interim injunction may be issued. 
Paragraph 1 (a) provides that a judge of 
the Superior Court may grant an interim 
injunction at the time of issuing a writ of 
summons whenever it appears that the 
plaintiff is entitled to the relief demanded 
and that the relief consists in restraining 
the commission or continuance of any act. 
His Lordship stated that in such a case 
the clear rights of the parties must be 
established and the court must fully con- 
sider the harm that the injunction might 
cause to the defendant party. 

He pointed out that in this case the 
injunction caused serious injury to the 



company in that it prevented it from 
exercising a right inherent in industrial 
ownership and management, the right to 
change methods of production or arrange- 
ment of machinery. He considered that the 
union's rights in the matter were not clear. 
Moreover, if the injunction were refused, 
no irreparable harm would result to the 
union or its members because the com- 
pany's legal obligations to them would 
remain the same and any injury could be 
compensated. 

In His Lordship's view, to uphold the 
injunction would be to establish the 
precedent that, whenever a worker is 
discharged because of some reorganization 
in a factory, the employer may have to 
face a court case. ► To say that an 
employer must ask and obtain the consent 
of his employees before carrying out the 
slightest change would be to misinterpret 
Section 24 of the Labour Relations Act, 
His Lordship held. 

Mr. Justice Gagne, dissenting, examined 
Section 24 (1) of the Act to see if it was 
applicable to the situation. The union was 
recognized as bargaining agent for the 
company's employees. The previous collec- 
tive agreement had expired on November 
9, 1951, and subsequent negotiations did not 
result in the conclusion of a new agree- 
ment. The other steps which the Act 
requires to be taken before a strike or 
lockout or change in conditions of employ- 
ment may take place had not been 
followed, namely, the appointment of a 
conciliator who must report to the Min- 
ister of Labour within 14 days, the 
appointment of a council of arbitration and 
the reception of its report by the Minister. 
Mr. Justice Gagne held, therefore, that the 
union's claim that the employer had no 
right to change conditions of employment 
without his employees' consent should be 
taken seriously. 

In a case where the applicant for an 
injunction showed a right which was appar- 
ently well founded, the doctrine of "the 
balance of convenience and inconvenience" 
should then be applied, His Lordship 
stated. That is, which of the two parties 
would suffer the greatest damage if it lost 
its case? 

The company maintained that the change 
was necessary if it were to compete effec- 
tively with other manufacturers and meet 
current economic conditions. The enforce- 
ment of the injunction would cost $800 a 
week in wages of $1 an hour to 20 
employees on a 40-hour week. The 
employer also stated that the 20 workers 
deprived of their usual job "were trans- 



109 



f erred elsewhere". Mr. Justice Gagne 
stated that this had not been established. 

He then proceeded to consider the 
union's case. It appeared that 20 
employees would be dismissed if the com- 
pany were allowed to put through the 
change. If it were true that these 20 men 
would remain in the company's employ at 
the same salary, the injury would obviously 
be less serious; but it was no less true 
that the workers continuing to operate the 
looms would have a heavier task and 
greater responsibility while those trans- 
ferred elsewhere would have to do a 
different type of work from what they were 
accustomed to do. 

For these reasons Mr. Justice Gagne 
would have dismissed the company's appeal. 
Dominion Textile Company Limited v. 
Syndicat Catholique des Ouvriers du Tex- 
tile de Magog Inc., [1952] BR Montreal, 
No. 9, 666. 

Quebec Superior Court . . . 

. . . holding that the employer was not negligent, 
dismisses action of injured worker for damages 

The Quebec Superior Court at Iberville 
on February 1, 1952, dismissed an employee's 
action for damages against his employer 
for injuries received while he was testing 
a die on an automatic press. The Court 
held that there was no defect in the 
machine or other negligence on the part 
of the employer and that the accident was 
due to the employee's own carelessness. 

In his reasons for decision, Mr. Justice 
Challies described how the accident 
occurred. The plaintiff, a die maker, was 
testing a die by cutting out pieces from 
a strip of metal. He had cut out three 
or four pieces, each time pressing once on 
the pedal and causing the press to fall once. 
The fourth or fifth time that he pressed 
the pedal the press fell five or six times 
instead of once so that when he reached 
into the press to pick out the formed piece 
of metal his fingers were cut off by the 
falling press. 

The plaintiff based his case on Articles 

1053 and 1054 of the Civil Code. Article 

1054 makes a person responsible not only 
for the damage caused by his own fault 
but for that caused by things under his 
care. For the plaintiff's case to succeed 
under this provision, he must prove that 
the accident happened as a direct result of 
a defect in the press itself without any 
human intervention, His Lordship stated. 

The plaintiff testified that if one pressed 
once on the foot pedal the press was 
supposed to drop once and once only. One 
of the defendants stated that one pressure 



on the foot pedal, if well applied, would cause 
the press to fall once, but that the press 
could repeat as long as the operator kept 
his foot on the pedal. A catalogue describ- 
ing the type of press included a descrip- 
tion of a single stroke mechanism which 
could be used to ensure that the treadle 
must be raised and again depressed for 
each stroke of the press. The evidence did 
not establish whether or not the press was 
equipped with this single stroke mechanism 
and, if it was, whether the mechanism was 
engaged at the time of the accident. In 
any case, one of the plaintiff's witnesses 
cast some doubt on whether one stroke of 
the treadle always gives just one stroke 
of the press and seemed to suggest that 
foot pressure should be applied gently. 
Evidence was given that the press was 
working normally both before and after 
the accident. 

His Lordship concluded that the plaintiff 
had not proved that the press was defective 
or that it was the act of the press itself, 
without human intervention, which caused 
the accident. 

Article 1053 reads: — 

Every person capable of discerning right 
from wrong is responsible for the damage 
caused by his fault to another, whether 
by positive act, imprudence, neglect or 
want of skill. 

The plaintiff claimed that the company 
was guilty of negligence for operating a 
dangerous machine without an automatic 
guard and doing nothing to protect the 
operator from the danger. 

A forming press like the one the 
plaintiff was operating is usually equipped 
with a guard in the form of a horizontal 
bar which drops in front of the press as 
its movable part is falling and so keeps 
the operator's hands out of the way. The 
plaintiff criticized the company because the 
press on which he was working did not 
have a guard. The defendants answered 
that it was not feasible to have a guard 
on a press being used by a die maker to 
test a die. A die maker must remove the 
guard before installing the die in the press, 
and frequently, while making the die, must 
test the die in the press several times 
before finding it satisfactory. It would take 
too long to install a guard on a press 
which is going to be required to stamp out 
only four or five pieces in testing a die, 
the company maintained. Several witnesses 
supported this view. It was also estab- 
lished by the evidence that the plaintiff 
was employed as a die maker. The Court 
accordingly held that the company was not 
negligent in permitting him to test his die 
on a press not equipped with a guard. 



110 



Counsel for the plaintiff also argued that 
the company was obliged to protect an 
employee engaged in work on a dangerous 
machine from the consequences of his own 
negligence. His Lordship stated that it 
was proved that the plaintiff had been 
warned at least once not to put his hands 
into the press. When he was hired he 
was instructed not to put his hand in the 
press but to use a screw driver or a piece 
of metal or wood to pick out the pieces of 
metal stamped by the press, or to turn off 
the motor before putting his hand in the 
press. The proof disclosed also that rods 
to be used for that purpose were kept on 
a work bench behind the press. One of the 
defendants testified that he had shown the 
plaintiff where the rods were and had 
instructed him to use one, although he had 
not actually put one in his hand. 

Mr. Justice Challies referred to the 
statement of Chief Justice Letourneau in 
Laramie v. Boucher [1944] on an employer's 
obligation to protect his workmen from 
dangerous machinery by giving the neces- 
sary orders and warnings. However, in 
Mr. Justice Challies' opinion, this obliga- 
tion does not extend to doing more than 
warning the employee of the dangers and 
supplying him with proper tools. The 
employer is not required to force an 
experienced employee to be careful. 
Accordingly, if an employee disobeys orders 
received in respect to security precautions 
he will have himself to blame for any 
accident resulting from such disobedience. 

His Lordship concluded: — 

In the present case it is my opinion 
that this unfortunate accident was due in 
no way to any failure of defendants or 
their employees to warn plaintiff of the 
danger of putting his hands in the press 
or to supply plaintiff with tools which he 
could use to remove pieces of metal from 
the press, but solely to the default and 
imprudence of plaintiff himself who, 
although a skilled and experienced die 
maker with a number of years' experience 
in working on and around the presses in 
the plant of the Singer Mfg. Co. at St. 
Johns, P.Q., imprudently put his hand into 
the press to remove a piece of metal. I 
do not think that there was any obligation 
on defendants' part to do more than to 
Avarn plaintiff of the danger and tell him 
to use a metal rod or some other similar 
device which was available on a work- 
bench in the factory near the press. They 
were not obliged actually to take a metal 
rod or a pair of pincers and put them 
into the plaintiff's hands. 

It was also alleged that the employer had 
admitted responsibility by paying part of 
the injured man's medical expenses. The 
judge held that the payments were made 
as a humanitarian gesture without any 
admission of liability. 



The Court accordingly dismissed the 
action. Bruneau v. Rainville and Another, 
[1952] CS Montreal, 7 and 8, 370. 

Supreme Court of Nova Scotia . . . 

. . . refuses employer permission to appeal to the 
Supreme Court of Canada in a certification case 

On July 8 the Nova Scotia Supreme 
Court refused permission to appeal to the 
Supreme Court of Canada from its judg- 
ment which quashed the Nova Scotia 
Labour Relations Board's order dismissing 
a union's application for certification 
because one of its officers was a Communist 
and directed the Board "to determine the 
application for certification according to 
law" (L.G., July, 1952/ p. 937). 

The Court, in dismissing the employer's 
application for leave to appeal to the 
Supreme Court of Canada, held that the 
judgment was made in the exercise of 
judicial discretion and could not be 
appealed. The Queen v. Labour Relations 
Board (Nova Scotia) et al, [1952] 4 DLR 
384. 

Newfoundland, Magistrate's Court . . . 

. . . fines company for interfering with employees 
rights, in violation of the Labour Relations Act 

As the result of an action brought by a 
union, an employer in Newfoundland was 
recently fined $400 for unfair labour 
practices. The Magistrate's Court at 
Harbour Grace, in a judgment given 
November 12, found that Fishery Products 
Limited had violated the Newfoundland 
Labour Relations Act by interfering with 
its employees' selection of a bargaining 
agent and by refusing to employ or con- 
tinue to employ members of the union 
which was seeking certification from the 
Labour Relations Board. 

The written judgment issued by Magis- 
trate White sets out the facts. The 
complainant union, Federal Labour Union 
No. 24833, Bay Roberts, was organized in 
June 1951 and received its charter in 
August 1951. In September, it applied to 
the Labour Relations Board to be certified 
as bargaining agent for employees at the 
company's Bay Roberts plant. On Sep- 
tember 14 the union wrote to the company 
stating that it had as members a majority 
of the employees in the plant and asking 
the company to commence negotiations 
with a view to concluding a collective 
agreement. 

On receipt of the union's letter, the 
company asked its manager at Bay Roberts 
to find out from the men how manv were 



111 



members of the union and how many were 
not. When the manager replied that there 
were one or two more non-union men than 
union members, an executive officer of the 
company went to Bay Roberts and called 
a meeting of employees at the plant. He 
told the men that it was not the intention 
of the company to recognize the union 
at this time because it did not have a 
majority of the workers and because there 
were objectionable features in the pro- 
posed agreement it submitted. He 
admitted in court that he may have 
pointed out that the company did not 
have to work under the proposed agree- 
ment since the fish, or some of it, could 
be sent to another plant. However, the 
company was not against organized labour 
and if the employees wished to form their 
own association the company would "talk 
to them". 

Within a few days an association was 
formed among employees of the plant. In 
answer to a question asked 03^ the associa- 
tion, the company's officer stated that 
members of the association would be given 
preference in obtaining work. The com- 
pany's practice was to hire employees on 
a daj'-to-day basis depending on the volume 
of work. The polic}' of giving preference 
in hiring to members of the association 
was put into effect by the general foreman 
of the plant on September 26 or 27, on 
instructions from the company officer. 

On September 27 the general foreman 
asked employees to sign a paper, prepared 
by the president of the association, stating 
that they were no longer members of the 
union. Nineteen men signed this state- 
ment. Four of these men, who were called 
as witnesses by the union, stated that they 
understood they had to sign this paper in 
order to continue working at the plant and 
that they had been working there since that 
time. Three others stated that they had 
refused to sign the paper and to resign 
from the union and that they had been 
refused work. 

When the union's application for certifi- 
cation was heard in March 1952, the 
Labour Relations Board directed that a 
representation vote be held at the plant. 
In this election, conducted by an official 
of the Department of Labour, nine out of 
44 eligible voters voted for the union and 
33 voted against it. The Board accord- 
ingly dismissed the application. The union 
then applied to the Minister of Labour 
for consent to prosecute the company on 
three charges of unfair labour practices. 
Consent was given June 9 and the prosecu- 
tion began September 10, 1952. 



The union's first charge was that the 
employer had violated Section 4 (1) of the 
Labour Relations Act, which forbids an 
employer or anyone acting on his behalf 
to "participate in, or interfere with, the 
selection, formation, or administration of a 
trade union". A proviso states that an 
employer may permit a trade union rep- 
resentative to confer with him during 
working hours or attend to the business of 
organization without deduction of wages. 
The employer may also provide free trans- 
portation to union representatives for the 
purpose of collective bargaining or permit 
a trade union the use of his premises. 

Counsel for the company maintained that 
the company was entitled to indicate its 
preference in the matter of a bargaining 
agent. On this point he cited the cases 
of Lakeshore Workmen's Council v. Lake- 
shore Mines Ltd., and International Union 
of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, Local 
240 [1944] 1 DLR and United Electrical 
Radio and Machine Workers of America 
v. Atlas Steels Ltd., and Atlas Workers 
Independent Union [1944] 1 DLR. 

Magistrate White stated that the findings 
in each case were based upon a particular 
set of facts. He referred to this statement 
by Mr. Justice Roach in the Lakeshore 
case : — 

I do not think that the evidence estab- 
lished that the applicant is dominated by 
the company. That the company preferred 
the applicant to the union there is no 
doubt. Through its officers, it openly and, 
indeed, vigorously indicated that prefer- 
ence. What is "improper influence" is a 
question of fact in each particular case, 
but whatever the acts or attitude which it 
is alleged in any particular case constitute 
improper influence, they must, in order to 
be thus designated, be such that, either 
individually or collectively, they inter- 
fered with the decision, judgment or 
action of the members of the bargaining 
agency, either to the prejudice of those 
members, or those whom they represent, 
or at least to the extent that the members 
of the agency are embarrassed in making 
decision® or taking action . . . 

Magistrate White considered that in the 
case at bar the employer's conduct did 
interfere with the employees' free selection 
of a trade union to represent them in 
collective bargaining. Since the company 
was not required to negotiate with the 
union before it received certification, the 
employer was not called upon to ascertain 
whether the union had a majority. The 
Magistrate pointed out that the company 
had apparently accepted its manager's 
figures of union membership without ques- 
tion although it must have realized that 
the workers were not obliged to make 
known to a company representative whether 



112 



or not they were members of the union. 
The company then on its own initiative 
suggested the formation of an employees' 
association and stated that it would 
negotiate with such an association but not 
with the union. Magistrate White termed 
"highly improper" the executive officer's 
threat that work might be diverted to 
another plant if the employees supported 
the union. The company's undertaking to 
give preference in employment to members 
of an association just being formed was 
also an improper attempt to exert pres- 
sure on the employees. The foreman's 
conduct in carrying out this policy helped 
the employees' association to obtain mem- 
bers. Magistrate White found, therefore, 
that the employer's conduct was contrary 
to the section of the Act forbidding inter- 
ference in the selection or formation of a 
trade union. 

The second charge against the company 
was that it had violated Section 4 (2) (a) 
of the Act, which reads: — 

No employer and no person acting on 
behalf of an employer shall (a) refuse to 
employ or to continue to employ any per- 
son, or otherwise discriminate against any 
person in regard to employment or any 
term or condition of employment because 
the person is a member of a trade 
union; . . . 

Magistrate White stated that the evidence 
of the four witnesses who stated that they 



were told by the foreman to leave the 
union or join the association or there would 
be no more work for them was uncon- 
tradicted. The fact that the foreman had 
refused to employ these men contrary to 
Section 4 (2) (a) of the Act was estab- 
lished by his own evidence. 

Thirdly, the company was charged with 
violating Section 4 (3) of the Act, which 
reads : — 

No employer and no person acting on 
behalf of an employer shall seek by in- 
timidation, by threat of dismissal, or by 
any other kind of threat, or by the imposi- 
tion of a pecuniary or other penalty, or 
by any other means to compel an employee 
to refrain from becoming or to cease to 
be a member or officer or representative 
of a trade union . . . 

Magistrate White held* that the actions of 
the company's officer and foreman had 
operated as a threat which caused some of 
the men to cease to be members of the 
union. 

The Court accordingly found the com- 
pany guilty on all three charges of unfair 
labour practices and imposed a fine of $200 
for the first charge and $100 for each of 
the other two. Federal Labour Union 
No. 24833, Bay Roberts, v. Fishery Products 
Ltd., St. John's, Magistrate's Court at 
Harbour Grace, November 12, 1952, 
unreported. 



Recent Regulations, Federal and Provincial 

Authority given inspectors under British Columbia Hours of Work and 
Minimum Wage Acts to issue permits allowing, for not longer than two 
weeks, longer hours in cases of extreme pressure of work. Minimum 
rates increased 10 per cent in Quebec. In Saskatchewan, locomotive 
engineers brought under Workmen's Compensation (Accident Fund) Act 



New regulations have been made under the Government Employees 
Compensation Act, which provides for the payment of compensation by the 
federal Government according to the terms of the Workmen's Compensation 
Act of the province in which an accident occurs or an industrial disease is 
contracted. The regulations follow a 1952 amendment which provided that 
compensation should be paid to a federal employee who is disabled or whose 
death is caused by a disease peculiar to his occupation but not compensable 
in the province in which he was employed. 



In British Columbia, authority has been 
given to inspectors under the Hours of 
Work and Minimum Wage Acts to issue 
permits, effective for not more than two 



weeks, allowing longer hours than eight 
and 44 in cases of extreme pressure of work. 
The order applies to all parts of the prov- 
ince except Vancouver and Victoria. 



67040—8 



113 



The Quebec Minimum Wage Commis- 
sion has put into effect a further 10 per 
cent increase in the minimum rates set by- 
General Order 4. 

A third group of railway workers, the 
International Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Engineers, has been brought under the 
Saskatchewan Workmen's Compensation 
(Accident Fund) Act. 

FEDERAL 

Canada Shipping Act 

Pilotage By-laws 

District of Sydney, N.S. 

Amendments with respect to the super- 
annuation of pilots were made to the 
pilotage by-laws for the Sydney District 
by an Order in Council (P.C. 4275) 
approved on October 15 and gazetted 
November 12. 

One amendment, which is similar to a 
change made in the bj'-laws for the Saint 
John district earlier this year, provides 
that not less than seven per cent of the 
gross pilotage dues received in any fiscal 
year must be paid into the Superannuation 
Fund. Formerly, the percentage was left 
to the discretion of the Pilotage Authority 
after consultation with the Pilots' Com- 
mittee. If the total amount contributed 
to the Fund in a fiscal year averages less 
than $375 per pilot, the regulations provide 
that an actuarial investigation may be 
made by the Pilotage Authority to deter- 
mine whether any additional contribution 
may be necessary to make proper provision 
for future benefits. 

A pilot who has served for five years or 
more as a licensed pilot receives, on retire- 
ment, an annual payment for life from the 
Superannuation Fund, the amount depend- 
ing on his length of service. The maximum 
amount which may be paid in a year out 
of the Fund was increased from $25 to 
$50 for each year of service or the sum of 
$1,800 instead of $900. 

As before, the widow of a licensed pilot 
or retired licensed pilot is entitled, until 
re-marriage, to receive an annual payment 
not exceeding one-half of the pension pay- 
able to her husband on retirement. The 
maximum amount payable to each child 
until he becomes 18 years old was raised 
from $25 to $120 a year. 

The increases in the maximum pension 
payable to a pilot and to the allowance 
for the children of a deceased pilot are 
effective from October 15, 1952, and do not 
affect pensions and allowances which were 
granted before that date. 



District of British Columbia 

A number of amendments with respect 
to pilotage rates and detention charges 
were made in the by-laws of the District 
of British Columbia by P.C. 4274 on 
October 15, gazetted November 12. 

Government Employees Compensation Act 

New regulations were issued under the 
Government Employees Compensation Act 
to provide for the payment of compensa- 
tion to employees of the federal Govern- 
ment who contract a disease due to their 
employment where the disease is not 
compensable under the law of the province 
in which they work. 

The Act was amended at the spring 
session in 1952 (L.G., Sept., 1952, p. 1196) 
to provide that in the case of any govern- 
ment employee whose disability or death 
is the result of a disease which is not 
compensable in the province in which it 
was contracted but which is "due to the 
nature of his employment and peculiar to 
or characteristic of the particular process, 
trade or occupation in which he was 
employed at the time the disease was 
contracted" compensation may be paid to 
him or his dependants. Until then, the 
Act provided for the payment of compensa- 
tion to federal employees in accordance 
with individual provincial Workmen's 
Compensation Acts, that is, a person who 
contracted an industrial disease in a 
particular province would only be eligible 
for compensation if the disease was in- 
cluded in the schedule of industrial diseases 
of that province, the only exceptions being 
hospital employees and nurses exposed to 
pulmonary tuberculosis, who were eligible 
for compensation even if tuberculosis was 
not recognized as a compensable disease in 
the province in which they worked. 

The regulations made in 1948 governing 
the payment of compensation to employees 
who contracted tuberculosis in the course 
of their employment are now rescinded. 

The new regulations made under P.C. 
4411 and gazetted November 26 prescribe 
the conditions under which compensation 
is payable, the amount payable, and the 
manner in which compensation is to be 
determined. 

As provided in the Act, an employee 
disabled by a disease arising out of his 
employment, and his dependants, are 
entitled to the same compensation as 
persons employed by private employers 
would receive under the Act of the prov- 
ince in which the disease is contracted. 
The employee's right to compensation and 
the amount payable are to be determined 
by the provincial Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Board. 



114 



The regulations, like the Act as amended 
in 1950, provide that where a person 
ordinarily resident in the Yukon or North- 
west Territories contracts a disease while 
employed in the Yukon or Northwest 
Territories, the disease is deemed to have 
been contracted in the province of Alberta. 

If a person ordinarily resident in a prov- 
ince other than the Yukon or Northwest 
Territories contracts a disease while 
employed in either of those Territories, the 
disease is deemed to have been contracted 
in the province of which he is a resident. 
Similarly, where an employee, other than 
one employed locally outside Canada, is 
disabled or his death is caused by a disease 
contracted while employed outside Canada, 
compensation is payable according to the 
Act of the province in which he was 
ordinarily resident before entering such 
employment outside Canada. 

Where the Deputy Minister of National 
Health, or a person designated by him, 
considers that employees are exposed in 
the course of their employment to the 
hazards of disease, he may specify pre- 
ventative and control measures and advise 
the officers of the Government department 
or agency which employs the workers 
concerned that such measures should be 
instituted. If the preventative measures 
include periodic medical examinations, the 
regulations require complete medical 
records to be kept including data respect- 
ing laboratory findings or results of exam- 
inations by special methods, together with 
any other information which may be 
required for the adjudication of claims. 

The Minister of Labour is authorized to 
make arrangements with the Department of 
National Health and Welfare, the Depart- 
ment of Veterans Affairs or any other 
.agency of the federal Government to 
provide for the use of the services of 
medical and health officers or other ser- 
vices as may be required for carrying out 
medical examinations or otherwise dispos- 
ing of claims for compensation under the 
Act. 



PROVINCIAL 

Alberta Licensing of Trades 
and Businesses Act 

New general regulations respecting the 
granting of licences under the Licensing of 
Trades and Businesses Act were made on 
October 1 and gazetted October 15. The 
Act gives the Minister of Industries and 
Labour authority to designate any busi- 
ness as one to which the Act applies, to 



provide for the licensing of all persons 
engaged in the business, and to prohibit 
the carrying on of such business by a 
person without a licence. Most businesses 
operate under permanent licence instead 
of a yearly renewal procedure. The general 
regulations now specifically prohibit a 
person from using a licence for any purpose 
other than for the operation and carrying 
on of the trade or business for which the 
licence was issued. 

Further, it is now provided that the 
owner of a restaurant or baking business, 
in applying for a licence, need not include 
with his application a certificate from the 
Local Medical Health Officer if the 
restaurant or bakery appears on an 
approved list of Class "A" restaurants and 
bakeshops issued by authorized health 
authorities. Other amendments, chiefly 
concerning licence fees, were of a minor 
nature. 

British Columbia Hours of Work 
and Minimum Wage Acts 

Exemptions 

Temporary exemption from the provi- 
sions of the British Columbia Hours of 
Work Act restricting working hours to 
eight in a day and 44 in a week may now 
be granted in certain cases by inspectors 
of the Department of Labour, in all parts 
of the province except Vancouver and 
Victoria. Previously, exemption from the 
Hours of Work Act could be granted only 
by order of the Board of Industrial 
Relations. 

Inspectors are now authorized to grant 
exemptions for periods not exceeding two 
weeks to industrial undertakings in excep- 
tional cases of pressure of work and to 
issue a written permit allowing working 
hours of any employee in such an under- 
taking to exceed the statutory limits. 

This new provision was contained in an 
order of the Board made November 7 and 
gazetted November 13. 

Workers in Shops — Christmas Season 

The annual regulation allowing employees 
in the mercantile industry to work addi- 
tional hours during the Christmas season 
was issued on October 30 and gazetted 
November 6. Workers in retail stores 
were permitted to work up to 48 hours 
during the week ending December 27, four 
hours more than the weekly limit set by 
the Hours of Work Act, provided they did 
not work longer than 10 hours in any one 
day. 



67040— 8i 



115 



The minimum wage order issued each 
year to provide for the payment of over- 
time rates to store employees working 
extra hours during Christmas week and to, 
require temporary employees in stores 
during the Christmas season to be paid 
the minimum wage for experienced workers 
was gazetted on November 6 (Supple- 
mentary Order 24, 1952). 

Employees who were permitted by the 
special hours of work regulation to work 
up to 48 hours during the week ending 
December 27 were required to be paid the 
usual overtime rate of one and one-half 
times the regular rate for all time worked 
in excess of eight hours in a day or 44 
hours in the week. 

For the period from December 1 to 
December 31, temporary employees in the 
mercantile industry who worked 39 hours 
or more per week had to receive at least 
$18 per week, the minimum rate set by 
Order 24 for full-time workers in the 
industry, and those who worked fewer 
than 39 hours, a minimum hourly rate of 
47 cents. 

The order also waived for the month 
of December the daily guarantee provision 
of Order 24 which requires employees 
asked to report for work to be paid at 
their regular rate for all time spent at 
their employer's place of business with a 
minimum of two hours' pay if there is no 
work and of four hours' pay if they are 
put to work. 

Newfoundland Old Age Assistance Act 

New regulations, repealing and replacing 
regulations made earlier in 1952, have been 
issued under the Newfoundland Old Age 
Assistance Act. Several provisions setting 
out the conditions under which an allow- 
ance may be paid are now omitted, since 
they are included in the federal Act or in 
the federal old age assistance regulations 
approved by P.C. 6596 (L.G., March, 1952, 
p. 310), which are now adopted as regula- 
tions under the Newfoundland Act. The 
only other new provision is that every 
field worker of the Department of Public 
Welfare is now designated as an investi- 
gator under the Act. 

The new regulations, gazetted November 
4, are retroactive to April 1, 1952. 

Newfoundland Blind Persons Allowances Act 

New regulations, also gazetted November 
4 and retroactive to April 1, were made 
under the Newfoundland Blind Persons 
Allowances Act. They adopt the regula- 
tions under the federal Blind Persons Act, 
P.C. 6595 (L.G., March, 1952, p. 312), as 



regulations under the Newfoundland Act. 
They are in the same form as the old 
age assistance regulations noted above and 
contain the same new provision. 

Ontario Vocational Education Act 

The Provincial Institute of Trades was 
recently established (0. Reg. 296/52 
and 0. Reg. 311/52) in Toronto under 
Section 17 of the Vocational Education 
Act as a provincial polytechnical 
institute for advanced technical training 
required in any branch of industry. The 
courses of study, subjects and time allot- 
ments for subjects to be taught at the 
Institute are prescribed by the Minister 
of Education. These regulations have now 
been issued under 0. Reg. 327/52, gazetted 
November 22. 

The trades taught at the Institute are 
ten of those designated under the 
Apprenticeship Act, namely, bricklayer, 
carpenter, electrician, mason, motor vehicle 
repairer, painter and decorator, plasterer, 
plumber, sheet metal worker and steam- 
fitter. The subjects to be taught are set 
out in a schedule for each trade, the same 
subjects being taught for bricklaying and 
masonry. The time allotted for each 
course of study is, in most cases, two 
months. 

Quebec Minimum Wage Act 

An increase of 10 per cent in all 
minimum rates set by General Order 4, 
1942, which applies to unorganized workers 
in factories, shops, offices, hotels and 
restaurants and other workplaces to which 
special orders do not apply, was approved 
by O.C. 1173 on November 6 and came 
into effect on November 15. 

According to the press, some 990,000 
workers are covered by this Order. This 
is the third general increase in minimum 
wages under Order 4 since 1950. In 
November of that year the rates were 
increased by 20 per cent and in November 
1951, they were raised by a further 10 per 
cent (L.G, 1951, p. 247; Jan., 1952, 
p. 66). 

With the latest increase, the minimum 
rates for factory, shop and office workers 
are now 51, 46, 41 and 36 cents per hour, 
depending on the zone in which the work- 
place is located. 

Saskatchewan Social Aid Act 

An amendment to the regulations which 
permit the payment of supplementary 
allowances of $2.50 a month to certain 
recipients of old age security provides that 
these supplementary allowances may not 



116 



be paid to Indians as defined by the Indian 
Act. The amendment was approved by 
O.C. 2344/52 on October 24 and gazetted 
November 1. A similar provision exclud- 
ing Indians was recently added to the regu- 
lations under the Alberta Supplementary 
Allowances Act (L.G., Sept., 1952, p. 1234). 
The regulations approved by O.C. 2313/51 
(L.G., 1951, p. 316) providing for a supple- 
mentary payment not exceeding $2.50 a 
month to Saskatchewan residents receiving 
blind persons' allowances were repealed and 
replaced by O.C. 2263/52, made on October 
10 and gazetted November 1. 

The new regulations are substantially 
similar to those they replace, in that they 
provide for the payment of a supplementary 
allowance not exceeding $2.50 a month to 
a person for whom Saskatchewan pays the 
provincial share of a blind person's allow- 
ance and who resides in Saskatchewan or 
in a province with which Saskatchewan has 
an agreement respecting the payment of 
supplementary allowances. 

The earlier regulations did not cover 
persons whose blind persons' allowances 
were not chargeable to the province of 
Saskatchewan. A new provision makes 
eligible for the supplementary allowance a 
person to whom Saskatchewan was paying 
the provincial share of a blind person's 
pension under earlier legislation at the end 

(Continued from page 49) 
wood products and iron and steel groups 
and 10 in the transportation equipment 
industry. 

Of the 53 accidental deaths reported in 
the mining industry during the quarter 
under review, 30 occurred in metalliferous 
mining and 13 in coal mining. In the 
.previous three-month period, 55 fatalities 
were recorded in mining, including 41 in 
metalliferous mining and eight in non- 
metallic mineral mining. 

In the transportation industry 50 fatali- 
ties were recorded during the third quarter 
of 1952, as compared with 60 in the pre- 
ceding three months. In the third quarter 
of 1951, 50 deaths were recorded. 

Thirty-four persons died as a result of 
accidents in the logging industry during the 
quarter under review as compared with 36 
in the previous three months. 

In agriculture there were 30 accidental 
deaths in the third quarter compared with 
15 and 31 during the first and second 
quarters of 1951 respectively. 

In the various branches of the service 
industry there were 28 fatalities during the 
third quarter, a decrease of seven from the 
35 recorded in the previous three months. 



of 1951, even if his present blind person's 
allowance is not chargeable to Saskatchewan. 
Also eligible for the supplementary allow- 
ance is any other recipient of a blind 
person's allowance who has resided in 
Saskatchewan for at least one year and is 
not receiving a supplementary allowance 
from any other province. 

Saskatchewan Workmen's Compensation 
(Accident Fund) Act 

Members of the International Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Engineers will be 
covered by the Workmen's Compensation 
(Accident Fund) Act from January 1, 1953. 
The application of the Brotherhood to be 
brought under the Act was approved by 
an Order in Council -(2446/52) on October 
31, and gazetted November 15. 

Most classes of railway workers are still 
under the earlier Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Act, under which compensation is 
recovered by action against the individual 
employer. The Workmen's Compensation 
(Accident Fund) Act permits any of these 
classes to come within its provisions on 
a majority vote of the members of their 
organization. Members of the Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Firemen and Engine- 
men came under the Act on April 1, 1948 
(L.G., 1948, p. 626) and members of the 
Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen on 
February 20, 1951 (L.G., 1951, p. 553). 



In the third quarter of 1951, 32 accidental 
deaths were recorded. 

An analysis of the causes of the 363 
fatalities which occurred during the quarter 
shows that slightly more than one-quarter 
of the victims had been involved in 
"collisions, derailments, wrecks, etc." 
Within this group, the largest number of 
deaths were caused by automobiles and 
trucks (39), watercraft (19) and tractor 
or loadmobile accidents (16). Accidents 
which involved "being struck by, tools, 
machinery, moving vehicles and other 
objects" were responsible for 87, or 24-0 
per cent of the total deaths during the 
period. These included 13 fatalities caused 
by objects "falling or flying" in mines and 
quarries and 10 in each of the classifica- 
tions falling "trees and limbs" and "auto- 
mobiles and trucks". In the classification 
"falls and slips" 62 accidents were reported. 
Of these, 55 were caused by "falls to 
different levels". 

The largest number of fatalities was 
recorded in Ontario, where there were 109. 
In Quebec, there were 87 and in British 
Columbia, 66. 

During the quarter under review there 
were 125 fatalities in July, 136 in August 
and 102 in September. 



117 



Unemployment Insurance 



•„ ■.:;v.:':. : .'>Xivi,..-< .... 






Decisions of the Umpire under 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 

Digests of two selected decisions rendered by the Umpire 



Decision CUB 859, September 5, 1952 

Held: (1) That the policy or practice 
followed by The T. Eaton Company in 
Winnipeg, Man., in respect to retaining 
married women in its employ is tantamount 
to a rule within the meaning of Benefit 
Regulations 5 A (1) (b) (i). 

(2) That vjhile it may happen in some 
instances that the rule is not applied, never- 
theless the exceptions to the rule do not 
alter the fact that the rule (or the policy) 
still exists. 

Material Facts of Case. — The claimant, 
who was married on August 11, 1951, 
worked as a sales clerk for The T. Eaton 
Company Limited in Winnipeg, Man., from 
April 1939, to December 31, 1951. She 
filed an initial application for benefit on 
January 8, 1952, wherein it was indicated 
that her employment terminated because 
it was against the employer's rule to retain 
married women in his employ and that 
"Eatons allowed claimant to remain on 
staff till now as she was supporting her 
parents till they got Old Age Pension and 
until Eatons could replace her". In 
answer to the question contained in the 
confirmation of separation: "Was this 
person separated because of a rule against 
employing married women", the employer 
stated: "Yes, dept. policy". 

The insurance officer disqualified the 
claimant from the receipt of benefit for a 
period of two years immediately following 
the date of her marriage pursuant to 
Benefit Regulation 5A (quoted in full in 
CU-B 772 (L.G., Feb., p. 194) ). 

The claimant appealed to a court of 
referees on the ground that she fulfilled the 
requirement of Benefit Regulation 5A (1) 
(b) (i). The court unanimously reversed 
the decision of the insurance officer and the 
latter appealed to the Umpire. 

Conclusions. — The insurance officer has 
discussed at great length the question of 
whether The T. Eaton Co. Ltd., in 
Winnipeg or its departmental heads are, 



for the purpose of the present case, to be 
considered the "employer" within the 
meaning of Benefit Regulation 5A. 

There is no doubt that The T. Eaton 
Co. Ltd., must be considered the "employer" 
within the meaning of Benefit Regulation 
5A. It is the company which is registered 
as the "employer" with the Unemployment 
Insurance Commission and which pays con- 
tributions under the Act in respect of its 
insurable employees. Even if the depart- 
mental heads were authorized to adopt 
their own policy in regard to the employ- 
ment of married women, the company 
would still be the employer within the 
meaning of that regulation. Nothing 
prevents an employer, as principal or 
through his departmental heads as agents, 
from having different rules regarding the 
employment of married women depending 
on the type and the exigencies of the 
business. 

In any event, I consider that this 
question is well covered in the following 
extract from the finding of the court of 
referees: — 

(1) The Winnipeg stores have full 
power to lay down what rule should be 
followed in regard to the employment of 
married women. 

(2) In those stores the power is vested 
primarily in the Staff Superintendent and 
the Employment Manager and secondarily 
in the managers of departments. 

In the present case, we are faced with 
the objective fact of a claimant who con- 
tends that she lost her employment 
through no fault of hers but on account 
of a rule which her ex-employer (The T. 
Eaton Co. Ltd. in Winnipeg) has "against 
retaining married women in his employ" 
and what has to be decided is whether or 
not such rule does in fact exist at the 
place of employment and whether or not 
she was dismissed in consequence of the 
application of that rule. 

The evidence is abundantly clear that 
if there is no definite or written rule at 
The T. Eaton Co. Ltd. in Winnipeg against 
retaining married women in its employ, 
there is a general policy or practice against 



118 



doing so. As an illustration of this, I 
need only to quote the following extract 
from the transcript of the evidence taken 
before the court of referees: — 

Page 15 — (transcript of the evidence) 

(Staff Superintendent of The T. Eaton 
Co. of Winnipeg) : 

Invariably the department policy is not 
to retain married women. . . . 

(Chairman) : Would this be a fair 
summary of your evidence or rule or 
policy — when a female employee marries, 
all of them, without exception are put in 
the category of employees who are liable 
to be laid off. Isn't that it? They are 
put in the category of people who are 
selected to be laid off when there is a 
lay-off. 

(Staff Superintendent of The T. Eaton 
Co. of Winnipeg) : 

Yes, that's a fair summary. Subject to 
marriage, they get in that category depend- 
ing on the season of the year. 

Under the circumstances and taking into 
consideration the intent and purpose of 
Benefit Regulation 5A, which is to prevent 
from receiving benefit those married 
women who are not genuinely in the labour 
field and not those who, like the claimant, 
want to work, I consider that the policy 
or practice followed by The T. Eaton Co. 
Ltd. in Winnipeg, in respect to married 
women is tantamount to a rule within the 
meaning of that regulation. While it may 
happen that in some instances the rule is 
not applied, nevertheless the exceptions to 
the rule do not alter the fact that the 
rule (or the policy) still exists. 

In view of the difficulties which face the 
adjudicating authorities when they have to 
determine whether or not an employer has 
a rule against retaining married women in 
his employ, I would suggest — and no doubt 
the employer's co-operation in that respect 
can be easily obtained — that clear and 
direct questions be asked in the separation 
questionnaire so as to ascertain beyond any 
doubt what is the real cause of the 
claimant's separation from employment; 
whether she asked to be retained in the 
service of the employer and whether the 
employer refused to keep her in his 
employ on account of an established rule, 
policy or practice. 

I might add that if the evidence indi- 
cates that a claimant has not asked to be 
retained in the service of the employer 
but has voluntarily left her employment 
because she assumed that she would be 
dismissed on account of her marriage, the 
requirement of Benefit Regulation 5A (1) 
(b) (i) is not met. 

The court of referees, in the present case, 
has found that the claimant was dismissed 
on December 31, 1951, in consequence of 



the application of the rule (or the policy) 
which The T. Eaton Co. Ltd. in Winnipeg, 
has against retaining married women in its 
employ and, as I have no valid reason to 
disagree with this finding, I must dismiss 
the appeal. 

Decision CUB 862, September 30, 1952 

Held: That employees, who were working 
on a short-time basis when a stoppage of 
work due to a labour dispute occurred at 
the plant where they were employed, were 
subject to disqualification from the receipt 
of benefit under Section 39 (1) of the Act 
for each day of the said stoppage. 

Material Facts of Case. — The claimant 
worked on a short-time basis as a weaver 
in a textile mill and received benefit for 
his compensable unemployed days. On 
April 2, 1952, he lost his employment by 
reason of a stoppage of work due to a 
labour dispute which occurred at the plant 
where he was emploj'ed. 

The insurance officer disqualified him 
from the receipt of benefit under Section 
39 (1) of the Act, for the duration of the 
stoppage of work. 

The claimant appealed to a court of 
referees contending that he should be 
entitled to the same benefit payments as 
he received prior to the strike. The court 
of referees, after having heard the claimant, 
his representative and two officers of the 
personnel department of the company, 
unanimously reversed the decision of the 
insurance officer. 

The insurance officer appealed to the 
Umpire and at the request of the claimant's 
representative, an oral hearing was held 
before the Umpire. 

Conclusions. — It is admitted that the 
claimant lost his employment on April 2, 
1952, by reason of a stoppage of work due 
to a labour dispute within the meaning of 
paragraph (1) of Section 39 of the Act and 
that he did not fulfill any of the conditions 
prescribed in paragraph (2) of the said 
section. 

The only question to be decided is 
whether his loss of benefit is applicable to 
each of the days of the stoppage of work 
or whether, as was decided by the court 
of referees and as maintained by the 
claimant's representative, an exception 
should be made with respect to the two 
or three last days of each week when, 
independently of the stoppage of work, he 
would apparently have been unemployed 
owing to economic conditions. 

According to the court of referees, the 
relationship of the cause and effect 



119 



between the claimant's loss of employ- 
ment and the stoppage of work due to 
the labour dispute existed only for the 
first three or four days of each week. 

Even if this could be established beyond 
any doubt, it is neither within the letter 
nor within the spirit of the law that the 
loss of the right to benefit as prescribed 
in Section 39 be applied in an intermittent 
manner. It must not be overlooked that 
the principle on which this section is 
based is that the Unemployment Insurance 
Fund must never be used to finance 
workers who are taking part in a labour 
dispute. 

It stands to reason that during a stop- 
page of work due to a labour dispute, a 
claimant cannot in turn be on strike and 
unemployed within the meaning of the 
Unemployment Insurance Act. The 



employees on short-time who are on strike, 
the same as other striking workers, carry 
on the fight to obtain better working con- 
ditions every day of the week and for as 
long as an agreement has not been reached 
with the employer. They cannot rightly 
contend that for the day on which normally 
they would have received unemployment 
insurance benefit they revert to their 
status of shorMime employees. 

For these reasons I feel that I must 
reverse the court of referees' decision and 
allow the appeal of the insurance officer. 

This decision applies to claimants . . . 
and . . . who made written representations 
to me and also to all the other claimants 
who are interested in this appeal and who 
have not proved that they can fulfill the 
conditions prescribed in subsection (2) of 
Section 39 of the Act. 



Monthly Report on Operation of 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 

Statistics* for October, 1952, show number of claims increased over 
previous month but amount of benefit payments made decreased by $146 

Unemployment insurance benefit pay- 
ments in October amounted to $5,710,740 
compared with $5,710,886 in the preceding 
month, and $3,901,854 in October 1951. 
The number of unemployed days for which 
compensatory payments were made totalled 
1,932,994, as against 1,933,547 in September 
and 1,567,172 a year earlier. 

The monthly report on the operation of 
the Unemployment Insurance Act, issued 
by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, 
shows that a total of 87,957 initial and 
renewal claims for benefit were filed in local 
offices across Canada, compared with 64,703 
in September and 82,902 during October 
1951. The increase in October was 
common to all provinces, the largest 
increases being registered in Quebec and 
Ontario. 

Total claimants on the live unemploy- 
ment register numbered 127,863 (91,872 
males and 35,991 females) on October 31, 
compared with 108,712 (74,477 males and 
34,235 females) on September 30, and 
128,373 (79,802 males and 48,571 females) 



Comparison of current employment 
statistics with those for a previous 
period serves no useful purpose if made 
on the basis of numbers alone. Con- 
sideration must be given to other 
relevant factors, such as the opening and 
closing of seasonal industries, increase in 
area population, influence of weather 
conditions, and the general employment 
situation. 



'See Tables E-l— E-7 at end of book. 



on October 31, 1951. Ordinary claimants 
accounted for 111,539 of the claimants 
registered on October 31, while the 
remainder consisted of 10,379 short-time 
and 5,945 temporary mass lay-off. 

Of the 83,418 adjudications recorded for 
initial and renewal claims, 65,409 granted 
entitlement to benefit and 7,725 were 
disallowances (failure to fulfill minimum 
contribution requirements) . Disqualifica- 
tions were imposed in 14,693 cases, in- 
cluding 4,409 on revised claims, the chief 
reasons for disqualification being: "volun- 
tarily left employment without just cause" 
4,913 cases; "not unemployed" 2,714 cases; 
and "not capable of and not available for 
work" 1,729 cases. 



120 



Persons commencing benefit during 
October numbered 50,848, compared with 
43,167 in September and 46,102 in October 
1951. 

During the week October 25-31, 79,406 
beneficiaries received $1,295,050 for 438,084 
days of compensated unemployment, com- 
pared with 74,309 beneficiaries, $1,242,698 
and 420,113 days during the week September 
27-October 3. For the week October 27- 
November 2, 1951, $955,883 was paid to 
72,267 beneficiaries on behalf of 384,654 days 
of proven unemployment. 

The average daily rate of benefit for the 
week under review continued at $2.96 for 



the third successive month, compared with 
$2.49 for the week October 27-November 2, 
1951. 

Insurance Registrations 

Reports received from local offices of the 
Unemployment Insurance Commission show 
that during October insurance books were 
issued to 4,220,068 employees who had made 
contributions to the unemployment insur- 
ance fund at one time or another since 
April 1, 1952. 

Employers registered at October 31 
numbered 244,880, an increase of 451 since 
September 30, 1952. 



(Continued from page 90) 
37 days. The negotiators for the Company 
were apparently not fully authorized to 
negotiate the proposed settlement. The 
Board was therefore obliged to bring in 
an arbitral award. 

The Board recommends as follows. The 
principle of overtime should be expressly 
and explicitly included in the contract, 
because the evidence clearly shows that 7 
of 9 ships of the Company sail without 
pilots or third mates so that the two deck 
officers frequently have to serve watches 
totalling 12 hours per day seven days per 
week. In our opinion this is an undesir- 
able practice and compensatory payment 
should certainly be made, and the Company 
should recognize that they are requiring 
their officers to serve extra time over and 
above the standard working day, to which 
they have agreed in Clause 5 of the 
Contract of last year. 

The total compensation for overtime, 
however, should not be 2^ days pay for 
each month of service, as the Union 
requests, but only one day's pay for each 
month of service. The reason for this is 
that this will be the first contract signed 
by a Great Lakes shipping company 
recognizing the principle of compensation 
for overtime in this explicit fashion, and 
we believe that anything in excess of one 
day's pay for each month of service would 
place the present company completely out 
of line with the general practice obtaining 
on the Lakes. It is not permissible for 
this Board to attempt to influence future 
Boards, but it is only fair and proper to 
record the opinion that we regard one 
day's compensatory pay for each month 



of service as the extreme minimum which 
might be required and we are content to 
recommend this minimum for the present 
in order to get the principle accepted. We 
are not prepared to suggest that it is 
sufficient compensation for some indefinite 
time in the future. 

In line with these recommendations the 
relevant clauses of the contract should 
read as follows: — 

(1) Rates of pay should be based on a 
30-day month. 

(2) Deck officers shall receive for a full 
season's service in lieu of leave 24 
days pay. 

(3) Deck officers shall be compensated 
for all overtime and Sunday work at 
the rate of one day's pay for each 
30 days of service. 

(4) For deck officers serving for less than 
the full season, an allowance of 4 
days pay in lieu of leave and one 
day's pay as compensating for over- 
time for each month of service, a 
total of 5 days for each month of 
service. 

We have the honour to be, Sir, your 
most humble and obedient servants, 
(Sgd.) B. S. Keirstead, 

Chairman. 
(Sgd.) John Bumbray, 

Company Representative. 
(Sgd.) M. Swerdlow, 

Union Representative. 
The Company Representative agrees with 
the award of 35 days but is in favour of 
leaving Clause 11 of the existing contract 
in its present form. 

J.B. 



67040—9 



121 



Fair Wages Conditions 



In Federal Government Contracts 

Schedules Prepared and Contracts Awarded during November 

Works of Construction, Remodelling, Repair or Demolition 

During November the Department of eight per day and 44 per week, provide that 

Labour prepared 102 fair wages schedules "where, by provincial legislation, or by agree- 

c ■ i • . 1 .,!• j . ,. ment or current practice, the working hours 

for inclusion in building and construction of any class of V orker s are less than 44 

contracts proposed to be undertaken by per week, such lesser hours shall not be 

various departments of the Government of exceeded on this work except in cases of 

Canada in diffWpnt narts of tho Dominion emergency as may be approved by the Min- 

uanaaa in amerent parts 01 tne dominion ister of Labo ur and then only subject to 

During the same period a total of 118 the payment of overtime rates as specified 

construction contracts was awarded by the by the Minister of Labour", and also specify 

various government departments. Par- $*$ . the rate * of WJ *Sff se \ °"J therein are 

,. , ? ,, ,^ , , 'minimum rates only" and that nothing 

ticulars of these contracts appear below. herein contained shall be considered as 

Copies of the relevant wages schedules exempting contractors and subcontractors 

are available to trade unions or other f ro ™ the payment of higher rates in any 

u„„„ f.A„ \„>r^^\rr,A ™v+;^ ~~ v~ «.+ instance where, during the continuance of 

bona fide interested parties, on request. the work such ' highe * rates are fixed by 

(The labour conditions of each of the provincial legislation, by agreements between 
contracts listed under this heading, besides employers and employees in the district or 
stipulating working hours of not more than by changes in prevailing fates".) 

Contracts for the Manufacture of Supplies and Equipment 

Contracts for supplies and equipment were awarded as follows, under the policy that 
wage rates must equal those current in the district: — 

Department No. of Contracts Aggregate Amount 

Agriculture 2 $ 55,563.06 

Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 3 42,066.80 

Defence Construction (1951) Limited 2 21,865.00 

Defence Production (October report) 190 3,932,056.00 

Post Office 12 85,226.07 

Public Works 1 7,962.00 

Arrears of Wages 

During November the sum of $65.22 was distributed on behalf of one employer to two 
employees who had been paid less than the required rate of wages on one Government 
contract. 

Contracts Containing Fair Wages Schedules Awarded during November 

(The labour conditions of the contracts and hours of labour not in excess of eight per 

marked (*) contain the General Fair Wages day and 44 per week, and also empower the 

Clause providing for the observance of Minister of Labour to deal with any question 

current or fair and reasonable rates of wages which may arise with regard thereto.) 



The Fair Wages Policy of the federal 
Government has the purpose of ensuring 
that all government contracts contain 
provisions to secure the payment of 
wages generally accepted as current in 
each trade for competent workmen in 
the district where the work is carried 
out. 

There are two sets of conditions appli- 
cable to government contracts, those 
which apply to building and construction 
work and those which apply to contracts 
for the manufacture of various classes of 
government supplies and equipment. 

The practice of the different depart- 
ments of the Government, before enter- 
ing into contracts in the first group, is 
to obtain from the Department of Labour 



schedules setting forth the current wage 
rates for the different classifications of 
workmen required in the execution of the 
work. These schedules, known as fair 
wages schedules, are thereupon included 
by the department concerned in the terms 
of the contract. 

Fair wages schedules are not issued in 
respect of contracts for supplies and 
equipment. Contracts in this group are 
awarded in accordance with a policy 
which provides that wage rates must 
equal those current in the district. 

A more detailed account of the federal 
Government's Fair Wages Policy is given 
in the Labour Gazette for July, 1946, 
p. 932. 



122 



Department of Agriculture 

(September Report) 
Hopewell Hill Marsh N B: Wheaton Bros Ltd, construction of dyke. 



Central Mortgage and 

St. John's Nfld: Willett Engineering & 
Surveying Co* surveying; Newfoundland 
Light & Power Co Ltd, electrical connec- 
tion to houses. Greenwood N S: Herman 
MacDonald Construction Co Ltd, construc- 
tion of houses; Kenney Construction Co 
Ltd, construction of extension to school. 
St Therese P Q: Noel Romeo & Co Ltd, 
installation of electrical distribution system. 
Ajax Ont: Samuel Jackson,* erection of 
prefabricated houses; J M Leitch* survey- 
ing; Onway Construction Co Ltd, con- 
struction of storm sewer. Aylmer Ont: 
Hydro Electric Power Commission of Ont ,* 
installation of electrical distribution system. 
Barriefield Ont: T A Andre & Sons Ltd, 
construction of storm sewer; McGinnis & 
O'Connor Ltd, surfacing of roads. Deep 
River Ont: Coghlan Construction Ltd, 
shaping of roads and driveways. Dunnville 
Ont: S G Powell* hauling & levelling fill. 
Hamilton Ont: Grisenthwaite Construction 
Co Ltd, construction of houses; Hamilton 
Construction Co, construction of houses; 
Hamilton Construction Co, construction of 



Housing Corporation 

houses; Head Construction & Supply Co 
Ltd, construction of houses; Head Con- 
struction & Supply Co Ltd, construction of 
houses; Medway Construction, construction 
of houses. Ottawa Ont: R W Farley* 
addition to machine shop — Strathcona 
Heights. Prescott Ont: Robb D Mackay 
Construction Co, construction of houses. 
Stratford Ont: D McQuistan, construction 
of houses. Uplands Ont: W O Pickthorne 
& Son Ltd, installation of electrical dis- 
tribution system. Windsor Ont: A Loiselle 
Inc, permanent improvements to houses; 
A Loiselle Inc, permanent improvements 
to houses. Portage la Prairie Man: 
Claydon Co Ltd, erection of prefabricated 
houses. Rivers Man: Underwood & 
McLellan & Associates Ltd,* engineering 
services. Winnipeg Man: J E Roziere, 
construction of houses. Namao Alta: A E 
Pollock, landscaping; J Little, construc- 
tion of concrete housewalks; Sparling- 
Davis Co Ltd, paving roads & driveways; 
Sparling-Davis Co Ltd, paving roads & 
driveways. 



Defence Construction (1951) Limited 



Greenwood N S: M F Schurman Co Ltd, 
construction of sewage disposal plant; 
Kenney Construction Co Ltd, construction 
of explosive storage bldg. St Hubert P Q: 
Highway Paving Co, construction of hangar 
aprons, taxiway & drainage; Louis B Magil 
Co, construction of water treatment plant. 
Valcartier P Q: Union des Carrieres & 
Pavages Ltee, paving. Ville La Salle, P Q: 
Automatic Sprinkler Co of Canada Ltd, 
installation of fire mains & ancillary equip- 
ment. Camp Borden Ont: Emery Engi- 
neering & Contracting Co Ltd, erection & 
finishing of explosive storage bldgs. Downs- 
view Ont: Redfern Construction Co Ltd, 
installation of component parts of bulk fuel 
storage; Swansea Construction Co Ltd, 
grading & construction of roads, walks, 
sewer & water lines; Richardson Construc- 
tion Co Ltd, erection of explosive storage 
bldg; McDonald Welding Co, erection of 
bulk fuel storage. North Bay Ont: Sterling 
Construction Co Ltd, construction of 
chapels. Orleans Ont: Edge Ltd, altera- 
tions to ventilation & air-conditioning 
system. Picton Ont: H J McFarland Con- 
struction Co Ltd, installation of steam 
distribution system; Cornish Construction 
Ltd, construction of sewers & watermains; 
Van Dusen Bros Ltd, installation of steam 
distribution system. Rockcliffe Ont: Ross 
Meagher Ltd, construction of air materiel 

67040— 91 



command headquarters bldg. Gimli Man: 
Peter Leitch Construction Ltd, construc- 
tion of chapel. MacDonald Man: Malcolm 
Construction Co Ltd, construction of chapel. 
Portage la Prairie Man: Malcolm Con- 
struction Co Ltd, construction of chapels. 
Winnipeg Man: Peter Leitch Construction 
Co Ltd, construction of chapel; Claydon 
Co Ltd, construction of command supply 
depot. Dundurn Sask: Piggott Construc- 
tion Co, construction of standard ordnance 
ammunition magazioes. Moose Jaw Sask: 
Piggott Construction Co, construction of 
chapels. Saskatoon Sask: W C Wells Con- 
struction Co Ltd, construction of standard 
guard house; C M Miners Construction 
Co Lt.d, construction of chapels. Cold Lake 
Alta: Bird Construction Co Ltd, construc- 
tion of chapels. Medicine Hat Alta: O'and 
Construction Ltd, construction of target 
rifle ranges. Comox B C: Dawson & Hall 
Ltd, construction of cantilever hangar; 
Premier Construction Co Ltd, construction 
of water & sewer extensions; McKinty & 
Sons Ltd, construction of chapel; Baynes 
Manning Ltd, construction of water supply 
chlorinator house & sewage treatment 
plant. Esquimalt B C: Luney Bros & 
Hamilton Ltd, construction of Pacific naval 
laboratory. Upper Whitehorse Y T: 
Marwell Construction Co Ltd, construction 
of underground steam distribution system. 

123 



(Building & 

Dartmouth N S: R R Power Ltd, instal- 
lation of chain link & barbed wire fence, 
RCN air station, HMCS "Shearwater". 
Halifax N S: Walker & Hall Ltd, renewal 
& restoration of floors & platforms. Mont- 
real P Q: Alphonse Gratton Inc, re-roofing 
of drill hall, rifle range & annex, Jacques 
Cartier Barracks. Angus Ont: F D Howie 
Construction Ltd, rehabilitation & cubicling 
of barrack block. Hamilton (Mount Hope) 
Ont: Frank Vickers, replacement of heating 
system in building, RCAF Station; James 
Kemp Construction, permanent sub-floor 
replacement and cubicling of building; 
Kingston Ont: J R Douglas Ltd, re-roofing 
of various buildings, RMC. Point Petre 



Maintenance) 

Ont : H J McFarland Construction Co Ltd, 
road improvements at CARDE. Gimli 
Man: Peter Leitch Construction Ltd, 
permanent sub-floor replacement and 
cubicling of barrack blocks. MacDonald 
Man: Pearson Construction Co Ltd, per- 
manent sub-floor replacement & interior 
rehabilitation of bldgs, RCAF Station. 
Calgary Alta: Barr & Anderson (Interior) 
Ltd, application of built-up roofs on 
hangars. Patricia Bay B C: Universal 
Sheet Metal Works, roof replacement on 
hangar, RCAF Station. Whitehorse Y T: 
Marwell Construction Co Ltd, addition to 
radio station. 



National Harbours Board 

Chicoutimi Harbour P Q : Beaudet & Fils, Bros & Wilson Ltd, reconstruction shed 
redecking and repairs to west end wooden No 1; Westeel Products Ltd, renewal of 
wharf. Vancouver Harbour B C: Smith roofing, No 2 elevator. 



Department of 

Amherst N S: Rodney Contractors Ltd, 
repairs, painting, etc. Cap Rouge N S: 
J A MacDonald, W MacDonald, A R 
MacDonald & A MacDonald, repairs to 
breakwater-wharf. Coffin's Island N S: 
Mosher & Rawding Ltd, extension to 
shore protection. Cribbin's Point N S: 
F W Digdon & Sons Ltd, wharf 
repairs. Hampton N S: Kenney Con- 
struction Co Ltd, breakwater - wharf 
reconstruction. Park's Creek (LaHave 
River) N S: Mosher & Rawding Ltd, wharf 
reconstruction. Sandford N S: L G & M H 
Smith Ltd, breakwater repairs. Andover 
N B: Armstrong Bros, construction of 
customs & immigration bldgs & site ' 
development. Pointe du Chene N B: 
J W & J Anderson Ltd, wharf repairs. 
St Edward N B: J W & J Anderson Ltd, 
construction of breakwater. C ap-aux-M eules 
P Q: Gulf Maritime Construction Co, con- 
struction of breakwater wharf. Lacolle 
P Q: J J Shea Ltd, alterations to bus 
terminal & examining warehouse. Lanoraie 
P Q: Lucien Lachapelle, construction of 
concrete icebreaker. Fort William Ont: 



Public Works 

Canadian Dredge & Dock Co Ltd, harbour 
improvements (rubble mound breakwater). 
Ottawa Ont: Edgar Dagenais, partitions, 
electrical work, etc, Labelle & Monument 
National Bldgs; James More & Sons Ltd, 
construction of an explosives laboratory, 
Uplands Airport; Modern Decoration 
Moderne, interior painting, No 8 Temporary 
Bldg ; Taggart Construction Ltd, alterations 
& improvements, No 7 Temporary Bldg. 
Sand Point Lake Ont: John Reid & Co 
Ltd, construction of wharves. Wheatley 
Ont: Dean Construction Co Ltd, harbour 
improvements. Dodge Cove (Digby 
Island) B C: Osland Logging & Contract- 
ing Co., wharf repairs. Inverness Passage 
(Skeena River) B C: British Columbia 
Bridge & Dredging Co * dredging. Lillooet 
B C: Sardis Builders, construction of 
nursing station for Indian Health Service. 
Ocean Falls B C: Victoria Pile Driving Co 
Ltd, construction of floats. Prince Rupert 
B C: Skeena Pile Driving Co Ltd, log 
breakwater extension. Squamish B C: 
West Coast Dredging Co Ltd* dredging. 



Department 

Port aux Basques Nfid: Robb Engineering 
Works Ltd, construction of transit shed. 
Moncton N B: Modern Construction Ltd, 
construction of access road to air terminal 
bldg. Dorval P Q: Bedard-Girard Ltd, 
installation of airport lighting facilities. 
Maniwaki P Q: Rodolphe Alie, construc- 
tion of rawinsonde tower, office bldgs, 



of Transport 

hydrogen generator bldg & dwellings. 
Seven Islands P Q: Tower Co Ltd, instal- 
lation of field lighting. Kenora Ont: P A 
Chop, addition to radio-meteorological bldg. 
Edmonton Alta: S H Parsons, construction 
of rawinsonde tower, office bldg, generator 
bldg. Alert Bay B C: McGinnis Bros, 
erection of dwellings. 



124 



Wages, Hours and 
Wor kin g Condi lions 



Municipal Government Service 

Wage increases and tendency towards shorter work week for municipal 
employees indicated by October 1952, survey of 71 Canadian centres 



An analysis of returns received from 71 
Canadian municipalities in the October 
1952 survey of wages and salaries indi- 
cates wage increases in the majority of 
centres and evidence of a shortening 
standard work week. In the accompany- 
ing table, the most recent information on 
wages and hours is shown for policemen, 
firefighters, and labourers employed in 
works, sanitation and engineering services. 

Wage Rates and Salaries 

The table shows the maximum basic 
salaries* for police constables and fire- 
fighters and hourly wage rates for civic 
labourers as well as standard hours per 
week in 71 cities, immediately prior to 
October 1, 1951 and 1952. Police con- 
constables in 58 of these cities received 
salary increases ranging from $60 per year 
in Fort William to $598 in Trois Rivieres. 
The average increase for the 58 cities was 
$307. Salaries reported ranged from $2,160 
per year in Charlottetown to $3,816 in 
Vancouver, with the majority of the 
municipalities reporting between $2,800 and 
$3,500 per year. 

In Fredericton and Brandon, firefighters 
were receiving $2,400 per year in October 
1952, while in Vancouver they received 
$3,816. The largest number of salaries 
reported was in the range $2,600-$3,500 
with 35 of the municipalities reporting over 
$3,000. There was considerable variation 
in the size of the increases, the lowest 
being $39 and the highest $632 ; the average 
in those cities showing increases was $311 
per year. Sixteen cities paid their firemen 
the same annual salaries as police 
constables. 



* The "maximum basic salary" for police 
constables and firefighters is the salary paid 
after the probationary and training period 
has been completed, frequently from three 
to five years, but before long-term service 
increases are obtained. It includes cost-of- 
living bonuses, wherever paid, but does not 
include allowances for uniforms, boots, 
transportation, etc. In almost every instance, 
the salaries listed are those received by 
the majority of the police constables or 
firefighters in each of the communities. 



Each year, the Economics and 
Research Branch of the Department 
of Labour surveys some 16,000 
industrial establishments requesting 
information on Wages and working 
conditions. This year, the survey is 
divided into two parts, with infor- 
mation on wages and hours being 
obtained in October and information 
for certain aspects of working con- 
ditions in April. 

The present article is the first of 
a series based on results of the 
October 1952, survey. Succeeding 
issues of the Labour Gazette will 
contain similar articles on other 
industries. 



The hourly wage rates shown for 
labourers apply to Works Department 
employees. In some cases where ranges of 
rates are given, the lower figure represents 
the starting wage rate and the higher one 
the maximum rate paid to labourers, 
generally to those engaged in more arduous 
or difficult work or to those who have 
received a length-of-service increment. The 
hourly wage rates paid in October 1952, 
to civic labourers varied from 70 cents an 
hour, the basic rate in Charlottetown and 
Quebec to $1.50 in Prince Rupert. The 
size of the hourly increases ranged from 
one cent per hour in Nelson to 22 cents 
in Montreal and Calgary. For the 56 
centres in which increases were given, the 
average was 11 cents an hour. 

Hours of Work 

A tendency towards a shorter standard 
work week for police departments is 
revealed by the most recent survey. In 
October 1952, the predominant work week 
for policemen was still 48 hours, although 
there was a substantial increase over 1951 
in the number of localities whose police 
departments were on a 44-hour week. 



125 



WAGE RATES AND HOURS OF LABOUR IN 

Note: — The rates shown below are preliminary but little or no change is expected in the final figures. 



Municipality 


Police Constable 


Firefighter 


Maximum Basic 

Salary 

per Year 


Standard 

Hours 
Per Week 


Maximum Basic 

Salary 

Per Year 


Standard 

Hours 
per Week 


Newfoundland — 

Bell Island 


1951 

$ 


1952 


1951 


1952 


1951 

$ 


1952 


1951 


1952 






































Prince Edward Island — 


2,184 

2,768 
2,400 
2,580 

2,331 
2,640 
2,529 

2,288 
3,224 
2,521 

2,657 
3,439 
2,937 
2,464 
2,496 
2,600 
2,642 
2,600 
2,314 
3,438 
3,350 

2,830 
3,240 
2,675 
2,860 
2,600 
3,217 
2,900 
2,786 
3,274 
2,850 
2,832 
2,881 
3,043 
2,991 
3,305 
3,090 
3,111 
2,769 
2,850 
2,940 
2,724 
3,915 
2,775 
3,240 
2,800 
3,253 
2,904 
3,453 
2,900 
3,230 
2,600 

2,340 
2,562 
3.146 

2,977 
2,916 
3,072 
2,760 

2,869 
3,080 
2,520 
2,598 


2,160 

2,035 

2,880 
2,820 

2,580 
3,036 

2,845 

2,600 
3,328 
2,521 

2,889 
3,503 
2,704 
2,464 
2,704 
2,600 

"2,'600 

2,912 
3,501 
3,350 

3,080 
3,196 
2,925 
3,260 
2,950 
3,277 
3,140 
3,300 
3,274 
3,025 

"*3*28i" 

3,480 
3,400 
3,600 
3,150 
3,461 
3,202 
2,850 
3,240 
3,250 

' '3,'300 

3,480 
3,100 
3,545 
3,240 
3,775 
3,300 
3,500 
3.000 

2,460 
2,995 
3,290 

3,182 
2,940 
3,372 
3,174 

3,356 
3,200 
3,060 
3,120 


48 

54 
50 

48 

48 
48 
48 

48 
56 
48 

60 
48 
48 
60 
60 
56 
48 
56 
56 
48 
48 

48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
44 
48 
48 
48 
44 
48 
48 
48 
44 
48 
44 
48 
48 
48 
48 
40 
48 
48 
48 
40 
48 
40 
48 

48 
48 
44 

44 
44 
42 
48 

40 
40 
40 
40 


48 

52 
50 

48 

48 
44 
40 

56 
56 
48 

60 
48 
48 
60 
60 
56 

"'56' 
56 
48 
48 

48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
44 
48 
48 
44 
48 

"'48' 
44 
48 
48 
44 
44 
48 
44 
44 
44 

"'48' 
40 
48 
44 
48 
40 
48 
40 
48 

48 
48 
44 

44 
44 
42 
42 

40 
40 
40 
42 










Nova Scotia — 










Halifax 


2,580 

2,520 

( l ) 

2,400 

2,600 

2,529 

2,288 


2,880 

2,400 
3,016 
2,845 

2,600 


76 
72 

84 
78 
82 

48 


72 






New Brunswick — 


84 




84 




68 


Quebec — 


56 






Hull 


2,390 




72 














3,439 
2,397 
2,464 


3,503 

2,592 
2,464 


63 

72 
60 


63 




72 




60 








2,600 
2,746 
2,600 
2,314 
3,438 
3,450 

2,730 
3,240 
2,675 
2,931 
2,450 
2,760 
2,425 
2,650 
3,189 
2,500 
2,772 
2,900 
2,964 
2,889 
2,896 
2,865 
3,143 
2,650 
2,800 
2,460 
3,003 
2,907 
2,825 
3,240 
2,725 
3,173 
2,940 
3,522 


2,600 
3,141 
2.600 
2,912 
3,501 
3,450 

"3,'240' 
2,900 
3,093 
2,900 
3,120 
2,625 
2,900 
3,189 
2,825 
3,201 
3,250 
3,271 
3,275 
3,225 
3,150 
3,052 
2,650 
3,248 
3,081 
3,307 
3,007 
3,300 

"3,025" 
3,545 
3,216 
3,782 


56 

72 
56 
56 
72 

72 

72 
56 
72 
56 
60 
48 
56 
56 
48 
56 
56 
56 
56 
60 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
48 
56 
56 
56 
48 
56 
56 
48 
56 


56 




72 




56 




56 




63 




72 


Belleville 






56 




56 




56 




60 


Fort William 


48 


Gait 


56 




56 




48 




56 




56 




56 




56 




56 




56 




56 




56 




56 




56 




48 




48 




56 




56 








56 




56 




48 




56 


Welland .. 






3,230 
2,350 

2,114 

2,526 
2,964 

2,616 

2,772 
2,718 
2,766 

2,869 
2,942 
2,565 
2,586 

2,760 
3,057 
3,264 
3,264 
3,060 
3,372 
3,143 


3,500 
2,750 

2,400 
2,679 
2,964 

2,736 
2,772 
3,018 
2,766 

3,356 

2,981 
2,872 
2,812 

3,180 
3,102 
3,684 
3,684 
3,360 
3,816 
3,775 


56 

56 

56 

48 
44 

56 
60 
48 
48 

48 
48 
48 
48 

48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
48 


56 




56 




56 




48 




44 




56 




60 




48 




48 


Alberta — 


48 




48 




48 




48 


British Columbia — 


48 




2,772 
3,264 


3,000 
3,672 


48 
40 


48 
40 


48 




48 




48 


Trail 










48 




3,372 
3.004 


3,816 
3,583 


40 

40 


40 
40 


48 


Victoria 


48 



(!) Drivers of apparatus only; others on call. 

( 2 ) Both police and firefighting duties performed by 



126 



MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT, OCTOBER, 1952 

Note: — The rates shown below are preliminary but little or no change is expected in the final figures. 



Municipality 


Labourer 


Wage 

Rate 

per Hour 


Standard 

Hours 
per Week 


Newfoundland — 

Bell Island 


1951 
$ 


1952 

* 


1951 


1952 






















Prince Edward Island — 


.60 — 

.99 J 
.95 - 
.99 

.75 — 
.88 

.87 

.70 
.70 — 

.85 

.95 
.84 and 
.84 — 
.70 — 
.70 and 
.75 — 
.85 — 
.75 — 

.70 
.79 and 
.80 and 
.92 

.86 
1.11 
.75 and 
1.02 — 
.90 
1.00 and 
.99 
.93 and 
1.05 
.85 
.85 - 
1.02 
1.00* 
.98 — 
1.17 
1.04 - 
.80 and 
.82 — 
.95 — 


.83 

1.06 

.94 

•85 

.94 
.94 
.71 
.75 
1.00 
.95 
.86 

.81 
.83 

.90 
1.15 

1.04 

.98 

1.07 

1.03 

1.13 

.85 

.96 

1.25 


.70 — 1.05 

1.10 

1.00 — 1.11 

1.09* 

.80 — .93 
1.02 
1.20 

.75 

.70 — .85 

.85 

.95 

.93 and .97 

1.03 — 1.18* 

.70 — .81 

.77 and .82 

.75 — 1.05 

.95 
.85 — 1.02 
.75 and .85 
.79 and .81 
1.00 — 1.05 
.95 and 1.00 

.95 

1.24 

.90 and .98 

1.14 — 1.27 

95 
1.06* and 1.10* 

99 

1.03 and 1.08 

1.12* 


48 

48 
44 
48 

48 
44 
48 

48 
48 
48 
48 

48 

48 and 54 

54 
44 
48 
48 
48 
45 
50 

44 

44 
48 
44 
44 
44 
44 
44 
42 and 44 
44 
48 
44 
45 
48 
44 
44 
44 
47 
44 


43 and 48 


Nova Scotia- 


48 




44 




48 


New Brunswick — 


48 




44 




40 


Quebec; — 


48 




48 


Hull 


47 








48 








45 








54 


Shawinigan Falls ( 2 ) 


44 




48 


Sorel (*) 


48 




48 




45 


Westmount 


50 




44 




4o 




48 




44 




44 


Fort William 


44 


Gait 


45 




44 




40 and 42 








1.01 — 1.16 

1.15* 

1.11 
1.11 — 1.14 
1.17 and 1.22 


48 




44 




45 




48 


North Bay 


44 














.82 — .96 


47 












St. Catharines 


1.13 

1.09 and 

1.04 — 

1.15 

1.04 

1.08 

.95 — 

1.15 and 


1.15 
1.16 

1.13 
1.25 


1.15 and 1.20 
1.20 and 1.24 

1.27 

1.36 

1.14 

1.14 
.95 — 1.15 

1.37* 


48 
44 
48 
48 
44 
44 
44 
40 


48 




44 


Sarnia 


44 




47 


Stratford 


40 




44 


Timmins 


44 




40 


Welland 




Windsor , 


1.37 J 
.90 

.76* 
.75 - 
.94 and 

.91 

.98 — 
.80 — 
.92 — 

1.00 — 

1.00* — 

.90 

.91* - 

1.09 and 

1.08 and 

1.24 

1.29 

1.12 

1.24 — 

1 1.15 — 


1.10 
1.00 

1.13 

.95 

1.04 

1.08* 
1.14 

1.09 

1.19 
1.18 

1 34 


1.37* and 1.43 
1.00 and 1.05 

.94 

.90 — 1.10 

1.02 and 1.07 

1.00 
.90 — 1.10 
.92 — 1.25 
.90 — 1.06 

1.22 — 1.29* 


40 
44 

44 
40 
44 

44 
44 
44 
44 

40 
40 
40 
40 

40 
44 
40 
40 
44 
40 
40 


40 


Woodstock 


44 


Brandon 


40 


St. Boniface 


40 


Winnipeg 


44 


Moose Jaw 


42* 




44 


Regina 


40 


Saskatoon 


44 


Alberta- 


40 


Edmonton 










Medicine Hat 


.95* — 1.15 

1 32 
1.00 — 1.28 

1.40 

1.50 

1.30 
1 36 — 1.46 


40 


British Columbia — 

Nanaimo 


40 




44 


New Westminster 


40 




40 


Trail 


44 




40 


Victoria 


1.19* 


1.31 and 1.35 


40 



127 



Consistent with the prevalence of the 
48-hour schedule is the predominance of 
the six-day week, with police departments 
in more than half the centres operating 
on this basis; 13 centres, seven of which 
were in Alberta and British Columbia and 
three in Ontario, reported a five-day week, 
usually of 40 hours, and 13 others, a week 
of 5^ days. 

Firefighters in most centres in Eastern 
Canada operate on the "two platoon" 
system — 10 hours by day and 14 by night, 
with 56 hours being the predominant work 
week. In a typical fire department, these 
shifts are arranged over six-week cycles in 
such a manner as to average 56 hours. 
Under this system, all work weeks are not 
of uniform length, but vary between 40 and 
80 hours. In the western provinces, where 



the "three platoon" system is used, the 
48-hour week is more common. 

The five-day week was found to be more 
prevalent in the fire departments than 
among police. Of 29 centres reporting a 
standard week of 56 hours for firefighters, 
20 reported an arrangement of working 
time averaging five days a week. The 
48-hour schedules reported were usually 
spread over either four or six days, in most 
cases the latter. 

In the works, sanitation and engineering 
departments, the 44-hour week was pre- 
dominant, as was the 5^-day schedule. 
Next in frequency was the 48-hour and 
then the 40-hour week. Very few changes 
in standard weekly hours took place since 
the 1951 survey. The five-day week was 
in effect for employees of this branch of 
municipal service in 20 centres. 



Prices and the Cost of Living 



Consumer Price Index, December 1, 1952 

Dropping to the lowest point reached in 
1952, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 
consumer price index decreased 0-26 per 
cent from 116-1 to 115-8 between November 
1 and December 1. The decline came at the 
end of a six-month period during which the 
index remained almost unchanged. 

Foods were the only group to register a 
substantial change, the food index dropping 
from 115-7 to 114-1 as the result of a 
larger-than-seasonal drop in the price of 
eggs and slightly lower prices for canned 
fruits and vegetables, grapefruit, potatoes 
and pork. Somewhat higher prices were 
quoted for other fresh fruits and vegetables, 
cheese, butter and some cuts of beef. 

These price changes were in combination 
with seasonally lower consumption of 
bananas, fresh tomatoes and pre-cooked 
meats and higher seasonal consumption of 
fats, canned pears and lamb. 

The clothing index declined fractionally 
from 109-8 to 109-7. Slight decreases in 
men's and children's wear were partially 
offset by a small advance in the footwear 
index. 

Within the household operation group, 
lower prices for household textiles, supplies 
and services were overbalanced by increases 
in the price of anthracite coal. The group 
index increased from 115-9 to 116-1. 



'See Tables F-l to F-6 at end of book. 



The index of other commodities and ser- 
vices remained unchanged at 116-6. 

The shelter index advanced from 121-4 
to 122-2 under the influence of a 0-9-per- 
cent increase in the rent component and 
a 0-3-per-cent advance in the home-owner- 
ship series. 

The consumer price index at December 1, 
1951, was 118-1; the group indexes were: 
food, 122-5; shelter, 118-2; clothing, 115-2; 
household operation, 116-4; and other 
commodities and services, 115-0. 

Cost-of-Living Index, December 1, 1952 

The cost-of-living index decreased 0-32 
per cent, from 184-8 to 184-2, between 
November 1 and December 1, 1952. At 
December 1, 1951, it stood at 191-1. 

The food index dropped from 229-0 to 
226-1; a year ago it was 249-3. The rent 
index increased from 148-9 to 149-9; at 
December 1, 1951, it stood at 144-8. The 
fuel and light index advanced from 151-1 
to 152-7; a year earlier it was 150-8. The 
clothing index dropped a fraction, from 
205-5 to 205-4; at the same date a year 
ago it was 215-5. The home furnishings 
and services index declined fractionally 
from 195-5 to 195-3; a year earlier it was 
200-6. The miscellaneous index remained 
unchanged at 148-8, up from the December 
1, 1951, level of 144-9. 



128 



COST OF LIVING IN CANADA FROM JANUARY 1946 




City Cost-of-Living Indexes, November 1, 1952 

Cost-of-living indexes for six of the nine 
regional centres declined between October 
1 and November 1 while three advanced. 
Mixed changes in food prices were recorded 
in all centres. Higher prices for eggs and 
butter and lower prices for beef and lamb 
were general. 

Clothing indexes moved down in eight 
cities, mainly because of decreases in men's 
overcoats and women's hosiery prices. Fuel 
,and light indexes were unchanged in six 
cities. Coal prices were higher in Montreal 
and Saint John. Decreases in rugs, sheets 
and brooms were recorded in the home 
furnishings indexes in most centres. Sub- 
stantial increases in towel prices were 
reported in Montreal and Toronto. 

In the miscellaneous group, small decreases 
in toilet soap were noted in a few cities. 
Increases in barbers' fees were registered 
in both Halifax and Edmonton, while 
theatre admissions rose slightly in Saint 
John and Montreal. Rents were not 
surveyed between October 1 and November 
1 and the indexes remained unchanged. 

Composite city cost-of-living index point 
changes between October 1 and November 
1 were as follows: Halifax, +0-7 to 174-7; 
Saskatoon, +0-6 to 182-1; Vancouver, 
+0-3 to 187-6; St. John's -0-5 to 102-5; 
Toronto, —0-4 to 181-4; Winnipeg, —0-3 



to 177-2; Edmonton, —0-3 to 176-7; Saint 
John, —0-2 to 181-4; Montreal, —0-2 to 
189-6. 

Wholesale Prices, November 1952 

Wholesale prices were slightly firmer in 
November. The general wholesale price 
index rose from 221-0 for October to 221-9 
for November. Changes in the major 
group indexes were only fractional; six 
advanced, two declined. 

Animal products moved up from 233-1 
to 235-4, reflecting strength in livestock, 
notably steers, meats, butter, cheese and 
hides, which outweighed decreases in eggs 
and fishery products. Firmer prices for 
newsprint and woodpulp, which reflected 
declining strength in the Canadian dollar, 
coupled with an increase in furniture 
prices, moved the index for wood, wood 
products and paper from 290-8 to 293-4. 

Higher prices for vegetable oils, grains, 
tea and canned fruits overbalanced 
decreases in raw leaf tobacco, automobile 
tires and milled feeds. Chemicals and 
allied products moved from 175-9 to 176-4 
as a result of firmer quotations for 
glycerine and tanning materials, which 
overbalanced weakness in paint materials. 
Iron and its products changed from 221-1 
to 221-2, following higher quotations for 
hardware and wire, while advances in 



129 



building stone and sulphur were reflected 
in an increase in non-metallic minerals 
from 173.4 to 173-5. 

In fibres, textiles and textile products, 
lower prices for raw cotton and cotton 
fabrics outweighed strength in raw wool 
and wool cloth to reduce the group index 
from 245-6 to 244-8. The group index 
for non-ferrous metals declined from 168-1 
to 167-6, because of continuing declines in 
lead and zinc. Quotations for gold, silver 
and tin were firmer in this section. 

Canadian farm product prices at terminal 
markets moved up from 221-3 to 222-9, 
because of strength in animal products. 



The index for this latter series registered 
a gain from 263-0 to 266*5, reflecting a 
firmer tone for livestock prices, fowl and 
raw wool, which overbalanced weakness in 
eggs. Field products declined from 179-7 
to 179-2, mainly because of lower prices 
for raw leaf tobacco. 

The index for residential building 
materials declined from 284-3 to 283-9 
between October and November, largely 
reflecting lower prices in the paint and 
glass and plumbing and heating sections. 
In the "other materials" group, an increase 
in wire nails advanced the index from 
227-4 to 228-8. 



Strikes and Lockouts 



Canada, November, 1952* 

Strike idleness, which declined sharply 
during November, was the lowest recorded 
for any month this year. Work stoppages 
causing the greatest amount of time loss 
were: copper refiners at Montreal, Que.; 
rayon factory workers at Louiseville, Que.; 
and cotton factory workers at Hamilton, 
Ont. 

Wage increases and related questions were 
the central issues in 15 of the 22 stoppages 
in existence during the month, causing more 
than half the total idleness. Two stop- 
pages arose over causes affecting working 
conditions, two over union questions, one 
over dismissal of a worker, and two were 
inter-union disputes. 

Preliminary figures for November 1952, 
show 22 strikes and lockouts in existence, 
involving 5,084 workers, with a time loss 
of 44,176 man-working days, compared with 
38 strikes and lockouts in October 1952, 
with 13,322 workers involved and a loss 
of 165,009 days. In November 1951, there 
were 22 strikes and lockouts, with 13,074 
workers involved and a loss of 38,810 days. 

For the first 11 months of 1952 prelim- 
inary figures show 205 strikes and lockouts 
involving 117,021 workers, with a time loss 
of 2,822,308 days. In the same period in 
1951 there were 245 strikes and lockouts, 
with 91,234 workers involved and a loss 
of 785,904 days. 



*See Tables G-l and G-2 at end of book. 



Based on the number of non-agricultural 
wage and salary workers in Canada, the 
time lost in November 1952, was 0-05 per 
cent of the estimated working time; 0-18 
per cent in October 1952; 0-04 per cent 
in November 1951; 0-28 per cent for the 
first 11 months of 1952; and 0-08 per cent 
for the first 11 months of 1951. 

Of the 22 stoppages in existence in 
November 1952, one was settled in favour 
of the workers, two in favour of the 
employers, six were compromise settle- 
ments, and three were indefinite in result, 
work being resumed pending final settle- 
ment. At the end of the month 10 stop- 
pages were recorded as unterminated. 

(The record does not include minor strikes 
such as are defined in another paragraph 
nor does it include strikes and lockouts about 
which information has been received indi- 
cating that employment conditions are no 
longer affected but which the unions con- 
cerned have not declared terminated. Strikes 
and lockouts of this nature still in progress 
are: compositors, etc., at Winnipeg, Man., 
which began on November 8, 1945, and at 
Ottawa and Hamilton, Ont., and Edmonton, 
Alta., on May 30, 1946; jewellery factory 
workers at Toronto, Ont., on December 3, 
1951; handbag factory workers at Montreal, 
Que., on August 31, 1951; furniture factory 
workers at Nicolet, Que., on September 27, 
1951; truck drivers and warehousemen at 
Ottawa, Ont., on January 21, 1952; stamp 
and stencil factory workers at Hamilton, 
Ont., on May 20, 1952; and waitresses at 
Timmins, Ont., on May 23, 1952.) 



130 



Great Britain and Other Countries 



(The latest available information as to 
strikes and lockouts in various countries is 
given in the Labour Gazette from month 
to month. Statistics given in the annual 
review issued as a supplement to the Labour 
Gazette and in this article are taken, as 
far as possible, from the government publica- 
tions of the countries concerned or from the 
International Labour Office Year Book of 
Labour Statistics.) 

Great Britain and Northern Ireland 

(The British Ministry of Labour Gazette 
publishes statistics dealing with disputes 
involving stoppages of work and gives some 
details of the more important ones.) 

The number of work stoppages beginning 
in September 1952, was 155 and 23 were 
still in progress from the previous month, 
making a total of 178 during the month. 
In all stoppages of work in progress, 28,800 
workers were involved and a time loss of 
106,000 working days caused. 

Of the 155 disputes leading to stoppages 
of work which began in September, 11, 
directly involving 1,300 workers, arose over 
demands for advances in wages, and 49, 



directly involving 4,400 workers, over 
other wage questions; six, directly involving 
1,500 workers, over questions as to work- 
ing hours: 19, directly involving 4,300 
workers, over questions respecting the 
employment of particular classes or per- 
sons; 67, directly involving 4,200 workers, 
over other questions respecting working 
arrangements; two, directly involving 100 
workers, over questions of trade union 
principle; and one, directly involving 300 
workers, was in support of workers in- 
volved in another dispute. 

United States 

Preliminary figures for October 1952, 
show 425 work stoppages resulting from 
labour-management disputes beginning in 
the month in which 470,000 workers were 
involved. The time loss for all strikes and 
lockouts in progress during the month was 
3,500,000 man-days. Corresponding figures 
for September 1952, are 475 work stoppages 
involving 230,000 workers and a time loss 
of 3,200,000 days. 



Selected Publications Received 

in Department of Labour Library 



The publications listed below are not 
for sale by the Department of Labour. 
Persons wishing to purchase them should 
communicate with the publishers. Publica- 
tions listed may be borrowed, on inter- 
Library loan, free of charge, by making 
application to the Librarian, Department 
of Labour, Ottawa. Applications for loans 
should give the number (numeral) of the 
publication desired and the month in 
which it was listed in the Labour Gazette. 

List No. 54. 

Accident Prevention 

1. Industrial Accident Prevention Asso- 
ciations, Toronto. Report of the 1951 
Conference and Annual Meeting, held in 
the Royal York Hotel, Toronto, 23rd and 
24th April, 1951. Toronto, 1951. Pp. 115. 

2. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Injuries and Accident Causes in Plumbing 
Operations. A detailed Analysis of Acci- 
dents experienced by Plumbers during 1948 
and 1949. Washington, G.P.O., 1952. 
Pp. 34. 



Canada — Politics and Government 

3. Canada. Bureau of Current Affairs. 

The Canadian Constitution, by W. J. 
Lawson. Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 1952. 
Pp. 39. 

4. Canada. Bureau of Current Affairs. 

How Parliament works, by E. R. Hopkins. 
Ottawa, 1952. Pp. 31. 

5. Canada. Bureau of Current Affairs. 

Local Government, by Wilfrid Eggleston. 
Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 1952. Pp. 29. 



Disabled — Rehabilitation 

6. New York (State) Employment Ser- 
vice. Division of the Handicapped. How 

Physically Handicapped People find Work, 
A Manual of Placement Procedure. Albany, 
1935. Pp. 29. 

7. U.S. President's Committee on 
Employment of the Physically Handi- 
capped. NEPH Week. Annual Meeting 
. . . Minutes of the Meeting, Departmental 



131 



Auditorium, Washington, D.C, September 
4, 1952. Washington, U.S. Bureau of Labor 
Standards, 1952. Pp. 22. 

8. U.S. President's Committee on 
Employment of the Physically Handi- 
capped. NEPH Week. Spring Meeting, 
the President's Committee on Employment 
of the Physically Handicapped. Minutes of 
the Meeting, Departmental Auditorium, 
Washington, D.C., April 18, 1952. Wash- 
ington, 1952. Pp. 79. 

Discrimination in Employment 

9. Age, Discrimination in Employment ; 
an FEPC Misfit (In The Yale Law 
Review. April 1952. V. 61, No. 4, Pp. 

574-584). 

10. Berger, Morroe. Equality by 
Statute; Legal Controls over Group Dis- 
crimination. With a Foreword by Robert 
M. Maclvor. New York, Columbia 
University Press, 1952. Pp. 238. 

Economic Conditions 

11. Brookings Institution, Washington, 

D.C. America's Wealth: The Last 
Hundred Years and the Next; The 
Illustrated Story of a Dynamic Economy. 
Washington, D.C, 1952. Pp. 48. 

12. Congress of Industrial Organiza- 
tions. Department of Education and 
Research. CIO Says: The Odds are up 
to You. Washington, 1952. This Pamphlet 
is about Economic Conditions in the 
Modern World. Pp. 29. 

13. National Forum of Labor, Agricul- 
ture and Industry. The Road Ahead. 
Annual Proceedings of the Sixth National 
Forum of Labor, Agriculture and Industry, 
Laramie, Wyoming, July 31, August 1, 2, 
1950. Laramie, Wyo., University of 
Wyoming, 1951? Pp. 154. 

14. Triantis, Stephen G. Backward 
Lands; The Other Front. Toronto, Cana- 
dian Institute of International Affairs, 
1952. Pp. 16. 

15. U.S. President's Materials Policy 

Commission. Resources for Freedom; A 
Report to the President. Washington, 
G.P.O., 1952. 5 Volumes. 

Employees — Training 

16. Johnson & Johnson, Inc. Standard 
Procedure for Training of New Employees. 
Rev. ed. New York, 1951. Pp. 13. 

17. New York (State) Civil Service 
Commission. Training Division. Train- 
ing Program for State Employees; 
Instructor's Manual in Fundamentals of 
Supervision. Albany, 1952. Pp. 105. 



Employment Management 

18. Bureau of National Affairs, Wash- 
ington, D.C. Supervisory Merit-Rating. 
Washington, 1952. Pp. 29. 

19. Chamber of Commerce of the 
United States of America. Economic 
Education thru Employee Meetings. Wash- 
ington, n.d. Pp. 36. 

20. Illinois. University. Institute of 
Labor and Industrial Relations. Workers 
on the Move: Labor Turnover in the 
Defense Economy, by Kenneth Lehmann 
and C. Edward Weber. Urbana, 1952. 
Pp. 23. 

21. Institute of Personnel Management. 
Annual Report, 1950-51. London, 1951. 
Pp. 16. 

22. Institute of Personnel Management. 
Annual Report, 1951-52. London, 1952. 
Pp. 16. 

23. Institute of Personnel Management. 
Report of the Council for the Year 1949-50, 
made to the Annual General Meeting . . . 
on 14 October 1950. London, 1950. Pp. 22. 

24. Wilhelm, Donald. An Employee 
Suggestion System for the Small Plant . . . 
Revised by C. W. Ufford. Washington, 
G.P.O., 1952. Pp. 19. 

Free Enterprise 

25. Chamber of Commerce of the 
United States of America. Re-Privatizing 
Public Enterprise. Washington, 1952. 
Pp. 38. 

26. Labour Party (Great Britain). The 
Future of Private Industry, by Joan 
Mitchell. London, 1952. Pp. 32. 

Fringe Benefits 

27. Chamber of Commerce of the 
United States of America. Economic 
Research Department. Fringe Benefits, 
1951 ; the Non-Wage Labor Costs of Doing 
Business . . . Washington, 1952. Pp. 32. 

28. Employers' Association of Chicago. 
Hourly and Supervisory Wage Survey 
Report and Fringe Benefit Report, Chicago 
and Cook County, Illinois, July, 1951. 
Chicago, 1951. Pp. 35. 

Industrial Disputes 

29. Great Britain. Court of Inquiry 
into a Dispute Between D. C. Thomson 
and Company Limited and Certain Work- 
people, Members of the National Society 
of Operative Printers and Assistants. 
Report. London, H.M.S.O., 1952. Pp. 46. 

30. Knowles, K. G. J. C. Strikes, A 
Study in Industrial Conflict; with Special 
Reference to British Experience between 
1911 and 1947. Oxford, Basil Blackwell, 
1952. Pp. 330. 



132 



Industrial Relations 

31. McGill University, Montreal. Indus- 
trial Relations Centre. Third Annual 
Conference, April 26 and 27, 1951. Mont- 
real, 1951? Pp. 34. 

32. National Industrial Conference 
Board. 85th Annual Report of the Con- 
ference Board, 1951. New York, 1951. 
Pp. 154. 

33. National Industrial Relations Con- 
ference, Pittsburgh, 1952. Transcript of 
Proceedings . . . held at William Penn 
Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. February 12, 1952. 
Washington, 1952. Pp. 70. 

Insurance, Unemployment 

34. Great Britain. National Insurance 
Advisory Committee. National Insurance 
Act, 1946. The Entertainment Industry, 
Report ... in accordance with Section 41 
of the National Insurance Act, 1946, on 
the Classification of Actors, Variety Artists, 
and Other Persons in the Entertainment 
Industry. London, H.M.S.O., 1952. Pp. 20. 

35. Great Britain. National Insurance 
Advisory Committee. National Insurance 
Act, 1946. Seasonal Workers. Report . . . 
in accordance with Section 41 of the 
National Insurance Act, 1946, on the 
Review of the National Insurance (Seasonal 
Workers) Regulations, 1950. London, 
H.M.S.O., 1952. Pp. 24. 

International Agencies 

36. Friedmann, Wolfgang G. NATO, 
Shield of Freedom. Toronto, Canadian 
Institute of International Affairs, 1952. 
Pp. 16. 

37. United Nations. Secretariat. Depart- 
ment of Public Information. United 
Nations Work and Programs for Technical 
Assistance. 2d ed. New York, 1952. 
Pp. 30. 

Labour Bureaus 

38. Great Britain. Ministry of Labour 
and National Service. Annual Report . . . 
for 1951. London, H.M.S.O., 1952. Pp. 174. 

39. International Labour Office. Canada 
Branch, Ottawa. Memorandum on the 
Organization and Working of the Federal 
Labour Department and Other Branches of 
Government Engaging in Labour Admin- 
istration in Canada, Together with Sug- 
gested Scope of Report following an Inter- 
national Survey of the Organization and 
Working of Labour Departments. Ottawa, 
1951. Pp. 13. 

Labour Laws and Legislation 

40. Industrial Welfare Society. Legal 
Problems of Employment. London, 1951. 
Pp. 84. 



41. New York (State) Department of 
Labor. Division of Research and 
Statistics. New York State Labor Legisla- 
tion, 1952. Albany, 1952. Pp. 12. 

42. Spector, John Jacob. Essays on 
Labour Law in the Province of Quebec. 
Montreal, The Author? 1952. Pp. 54. 

Labour Organization 

43. Amalgamated Clothing Workers of 
America. General Executive Board Report 
and Proceedings, 18th, Biennial Conven- 
tion, Atlantic City, 1952. New York, 1952. 
Pp. 395. 

44. Canadian Congress of Labour. 
Research Department. The Case for Union 
Security and the Check-off. 2d ed. Ottawa, 

1951. Pp. 43. 

45. International Union of Electrical, 
Radio and Machine Workers, CIO. Pro- 
ceedings ; Organizational Convention; 
Broadwood Hotel, Philadelphia, Pa., 
November 28th through December 1st, 1949. 
Washington, 1950. Pp. 204. 

46. United Packinghouse Workers of 
America. Seventh Constitutional Conven- 
tion . . . Nicollet Hotel, Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, May 25, 26, 27 and 28, 1950. 
Chicago, 1950. Pp. 253. 

47. International Union of Electrical, 
Radio and Machine Workers — CIO. Pro- 
ceedings; Third Annual Convention; 
Buffalo, N.Y., September 17-21, 1951. 
Washington, 1951. Pp. 412. 

48. Trades Union Congress. Report of 
Proceedings at the 84th Annual Trades 
Congress held at the Winter Gardens, 
Margate, September 1 to 5, 1952. London, 

1952. Pp. 599. 

49. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Case Studies in Union Leadership Training, 
1951-1952. Washington, G.P.O., 1952. Pp.23. 

50. United Textile Workers of America. 
Twelfth Biennial Convention . . . April 21- 
24, 1952, Miami Beach, Florida. New York, 
1952. Pp. 111. 

51. Zweig, Ferdynand. Productivity and 
Trade Unions. Oxford, Basil Blackwood, 
1951. Pp. 240. 

Labour Party (Great Britain) 

52. Labour Party (Great Britain). 

Facing the Facts; an Interim Statement of 
Labour's Home Policy. London, 1952. 
Pp. 12. 

53. Labour Party (Great Britain). 
The Real Nature of Conservatism, by 
Peter Shore; foreword by Morgan Phillips. 
London, 1952. Pp. 42. 

54. Labour Party (Great Britain). 
The Welfare State. London, 1952. Pp. 30. 



133 



Labour Supply 

55. Canada. Department of Labour. 
Economics and Research Branch. Seasonal 
Variations in Employment by Areas for 
Eight Leading Industries and for Various 
Canadian Industries. Ottawa, 1952? Pp. 9. 

56. Long, Clarence Dickinson. Man- 
power needs and the Labor Supply. New 
York, American Enterprise Association, 

1951. Pp. 34. 

57. National Manpower Council. Student 
Deferment and National Manpower Policy ; 
A Statement of Policy by the Council, with 
Facts and Issues prepared by the Research 
Staff. New York, Columbia University 
Press, 1952. Pp. 102. 

Labouring Classes 

58. Galenson, Walter, ed. The Scandi- 
navian Labor Movement. Berkeley, 
University of California, 1952. Pp. 104-172. 

59. Histadrut [i.e. General Federation 
of Jewish Labour in Israel]. Survey of 
Histadrut Activities. Tel-Aviv, 1948. 
Pp. 88. 

60. International Labour Office. "Immi- 
gration into Brazil from Western Europe". 
Second Report submitted by V. C. Phelan, 
Special Representative of the International 
Labour Office to Brazil. Prepared for 
Presentation to the Government of Brazil 
and the Director General of the Interna- 
tional Labour Office, Geneva. Rio de 
Janeiro, 1952. Pp. 28. 

61. New Zealand. Royal Commission 
of Inquiry into the Waterfront Industry. 

Report. Wellington, Government Printer, 

1952. Pp. 217. 

62. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

Developments in Consumers' Cooperatives 
in 1951. Washington, G.P.O., 1952. Pp. 29. 

63. U.S. Congress. House. Committee 
on Education and Labor. Right to Work. 
Hearings before the Committee on Educa- 
tion and Labor, House of Representatives, 
Eightieth Congress, Second Session, Pur- 
suant to H. Res. Ill . . . Hearings held at 
Washington, D.C., May 11 and 12, 1948. 
Washington, G.P.O., 1948. Pp. 72. 

64. U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee 
on Labor and Public Welfare. Migratory 
Labor. Hearings before the Subcommittee 
on Labor and Labor-Management Rela- 
tions of the Committee on Labor and 
Public Welfare, United States Senate, 
Eighty-Second Congress, Second Session . . . 
Washington, G.P.O, 1952. Pp. 1089. 

Management 

65. Donham, Wallace Brett. Admin- 
istration and Blind Spots; the Biography 



of an Adventurous Idea. Boston, Harvard 
University, Graduate School of Business 
Administration, 1952. Pp. 95. 

66. Industrial Management Institute, 
University of Illinois. Management, the 
Art of Control. Proceedings of the Fourth 
Industrial Management Institute held at 
Robert Allerton Park, Monticello, Illinois, 
November 7-8, 1951, Conducted by College 
of Commerce and Business Administration, 
with the Cooperation of Illinois Manufac- 
turers' Association. Urbana, 1950. Pp. 81. 

Occupations 

67. Larkin, William. Tendances Occu- 
pationnelles au Canada, par William Larkin 
et Patrick Allen. Montreal, 1951. Pp. 54. 

68. Nebraska. University. Look at 
Your Career; a Guide Prepared for You. 
Lincoln, 1951. Pp. 191. 

69. United Steelworkers of America. 
Job Classification; the Steelworkers' Pro- 
gram to eliminate Wage Inequalities in 
Canada, by Pen Baskin. Toronto, 1952. 
Pp. 5. 

Older Workers 

70. Fox, Harland. Utilization of Older 
Manpower. Boston, Harvard Business 
Review, 1951. Pp. 40-54. 

71. National Metal Trades Association. 
Company Practices regarding Older Workers 
and Retirement; Report of a survey of 
Members. Chicago, 1952. Pp. 13. 

Pensions 

72. American Federation of Labor. 

Pension Plans under Collective Bargaining ; 
a Reference Guide for Trade Unions. 
Washington, 1952. Pp. 105. 

73. Myers, Robert J. Railroad Retire- 
ment Act Amendments of 1951. Wash- 
ington, U.S. Federal Security Agency, 1952. 
Pp. 16. 

74. New York (State) School of Indus- 
trial and Labor Relations, Ithaca. Pen- 
sion Plan Policies and Practices; Recent 
Experience of Eleven Pension Plans, by 
Michael Puchek. Ithaca, 1952. Pp. 62. 

75. O'Callaghan, Donal. Problems in 
Modern Pension Planning. (In Boston 
University Law Review.) April, 1952. Pp. 
189-214. 

Prices 

76. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

Retail Prices of Food, 1950, including 
Historical Tables of Item Indexes, 1939-50. 
Washington, G.P.O., 1952. Pp. 37. 

77. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

A Short Description of the Consumers' 
Price Index. Washington, G.P.O., 1952. 
Pp. 8. 



134 



Rubber Industry and Trade 

78. Canada. Combines Investigation 

Commission. Rubber Products; investiga- 
tion into alleged Combines in the Manufac- 
ture, Distribution and Sale of Mechanical 
Rubber Goods, Tires and Tubes, Acces- 
sories and Repair Materials, Rubber Foot- 
wear, Heels and Soles, Vulcanized Rubber 
Clothing. Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 1952. 
Pp. 710. 

79. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Rubber Mills and Calenders; a Comparison 
of State Safety Codes and Standards with 
ASA CODE B28. 1-1949. Washington, 1952. 
Pp. 20. 

Wages and Hours 

80. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

Occupational Wage Survey, Los Angeles, 
California, January 1952. Washington, 
G.P.O., 1952. Pp. 46. 

81. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

Occupational Wage Survey, New York, New 
York, January 1952. Washington, G.P.O., 
1952. Pp. 44. 

82. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Union Wages and Hours: Printing Industry, 
July 1, 1951. Washington, G.P.O., 1952. 
Pp. 43. 

83. U.S. Congress. House. Committee 
on Education and Labor. Investigation 
oj the Wage Stabilization Board. Report of 
the Committee on Education and Labor 
to the House of Representatives, Eighty- 
second Congress, Second Session, Pursuant 
to H. Res. 532, a Resolution directing the 
Committee on Education and Labor to 
conduct a Full and Complete Investigation 
and Study of the Wage Stabilization Board, 
with Minority Report appended. Washing- 
ton, G.P.O., 1952. Pp. 28. 

tVomen — Employment 

84. Women's Industrial Council. In- 
vestigation Committee. Home Industries 



oj Women in London, 1897. Report of an 
Inquiry into Thirty-five Trades. London, 
1897. Pp. 87. 

85. Zweig, Ferdynand. Women's Life 
and Labour. London, Gollancz, 1952. 
Pp. 190. 

Miscellaneous 

86. Beloff, Nora. Troubled France. 
Toronto, Canadian Institute of Interna- 
tional Affairs, 1952. Pp. 16. 

87. Committee for Economic Develop- 
ment. The Threat to our National 
Security; A Statement on National Policy 
by The Research and Policy Committee 
of the Committee for Economic Develop- 
ment. New York, 1952. Pp. 41. This 
pamphlet is about the foreign policy of 
the U.S. 

88. Great Britain. Department of 
Scientific and Industrial Research. The 

Laying of Linoleum upon Concrete Floors, 
by C. M. Watkins. London, H.M.S.O., 
1948. Pp. 8. 

89. National Industrial Conference 
Board. New Product Development. 
Research and Engineering, by Elliott F. 
Higgins. New York, 1952. Pp. 52. 

90. U.S. Congress. House. Committee 

on Armed Services. Universal Military 
Training; An Analysis of the Universal 
Military Training and Service Act (Public 
Law 51, 82d Congress) in so far as it 
pertains to Universal Military Training, 
together with an Analysis of the First 
Report to the Congress by the National 
Security Training Commission. Washing- 
ton, G.P.O., 1952. Pp. 15. 

91. U.S. Department of Commerce. 
Office of Domestic Commerce. Tung Oil, 
a New American Industry, by Edmund C. 
Wood. Washington, G.P.O., 1949. Pp. 67. 



1952 Edition of Provincial Labour Standards Now Available 

Changes in the standards set by provincial labour laws are noted in each annual 
edition of the Department of Labour publication Provincial Labour Standards, the 
1952 edition of which is now available. A reduction in maximum working hours 
and an increase in minimum wage rates in Edmonton, Calgary, Lethbridge and 
Medicine Hat; higher general minimum rates in Manitoba, New Brunswick and 
Quebec; and an upward revision of benefits under the Workmen's Compensation 
Acts of seven provinces are recorded in the new edition. 

The bulletin sets out, in a form which permits easy comparison, the standards 
set by provincial law with regard to the school-leaving age, minimum age for 
employment, annual and public holidays, maximum daily and weekly hours of 
work, minimum wages for boh experienced workers and learners, workmen's com- 
pensation benefits payable in case of death or disability, and the provision made 
for a weekly rest-day. Workplaces dealt with in the tables are mines, factories, 
shops, offices, hotels and restaurants. 

Copies of this mimeographed bulletin may be obtained from the Legislation 
Branch, Department of Labour. 

135 



Labour Statistics 



Page 
Table 1 — Statistics Reflecting Industrial Conditions in Canada 137 

A— Labour Force 

Immigration Branch, Department of Citizenship and Immigration 

Table A-l — Distribution of Immigrants as Adult Males, Adult Females and Children 138 

Table A-2 — Distribution of All Immigrants by Region 1 38 

Table A-3 — Distribution of Immigrants by Occupation 139 

B— Labour Income 

Dominion Bureau of Statistics Monthly Estimates of Labour Income 
Table B-l— Estimates of Labour Income 1 39 

C— Employment, Hours and Earnings 

Dominion Bureau of Statistics: Employment and Payrolls 

Table C-l — Employment Index Numbers by Provinces 140 

Table C-2 — Employment, Payrolls and Weekly Wages and Salaries 140 

Table C-3 — Summary of Employment, Payrolls and Average Weekly Wages and Salaries 141 

Dominion Bureau of Statistics: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings 

Table C-4 — Hours and Earnings in Manufacturing 142 

Table C-5 — Hours and Earnings in Manufacturing by Provinces and Cities 142 

Table C-6 — Hours and Earnings by Industry 143 

Economics and Research Branch, Department of Labour 
Table C-7 — Real Earnings in Manufacturing 144 

D— Employment Service Statistics 

Dominion Bureau of Statistics 

Table D-l — Unfilled Vacancies and Unplaced Applicants as at First of Month 145 

Table D-2 — Unfilled Vacancies by Industry and by Sex 146 

Table D-3 — Unfilled Vacancies and Unplaced Applicants by Occupation and by Sex 147 

Table D-4 — Activities of National Employment Service Offices 148 

Table D-5 — Applications and Placements Since 1942 153 

E — Unemployment Insurance 

Unemployment Insurance Commission and Dominion Bureau of Statistics 
Report on the Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act 

Table E-l — Number Receiving Benefit with Amount Paid 154 

Table E-2 — Persons Signing the Live Unemployment Register by Number of Days Continu- 
ously on the Register 154 

Table E-3 — Claims for Benefit by Provinces and Disposal of Claims 155 

Table E^ — Claimants Not Entitled to Benefit with Reasons for Non-Entitlement 155 

Table E-5 — Estimates of the Insured Population 1 55 

Table E-6 — Unemployment Insurance Fund 156 

F— Prices 

Dominion Bureau of Statistics 

Table F-l — Index Numbers of the Cost of Living in Canada 157 

Table F-la — Consumer Price Index Numbers, Canada 158 

Table F-2 — Index Numbers of the Cost of Living for Nine Cities of Canada 159 

Table F-3 — Index Numbers of Staple Food Items 159 

Table F-4— Retail Prices of Staple Foods and Coal by Cities 160 

Table F-5 — Index Numbers of the Cost of Living in Canada and Other Countries 164 

Table F-6 — Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices in Canada 165 

G— Strikes and Lockouts 

Economics and Research Branch, Department of Labour 

Table G-l — Strikes and Lockouts in Canada by Month 166 

Table G-2 — Strikes and Lockouts in Canada During November 167 

H— Industrial Accidents 

Economics and Research Branch, Department of Labour 

Table H-l — Fatal Industrial Accidents by Industries and Causes 170 

Table H-2 — Fatal Industrial Accidents by Provinces and Industries 170 

136 



TABLE 1.— STATISTICS REFLECTING INDUSTRIAL CONDITIONS IN CANADA 



Items 



Total Population* 000 

Labour Force- 
Civilian labour force H) 000 

Persons with jobs 000 

Male 000 

Female 000 

Paid workers 000 

Without jobs and seeking work 000 

Index of employment (1939 = 100) 

Immigration No. 

Adult males No. 

Earnings and Hours- 
Total labour income 1000, 000 

Per capita weekly earnings S 

Average hourly earnings, mfg c 

Average hours worked per week, mfg 

Real weekly earnings, mfg. ( 2 ) 

National Employment Service- 
Live Applications for employment 

(1st of month) (3) 000 

Unfilled vacancies (1st of month) ( ! ) 000 

Placements, weekly average 000 

Unemployment insurance- 
Ordinary live claims (1st of month ) 000 

Balance in fund WOO, 000 

Price Indeies— 

General wholesale ( 4 ) 

Cost-of-living index ( 4 ) 

Residential building materials ( 4 ) 

Consumer Price index (1949 = 100) 

Production- 
Industrial production index ( 4 ) 

Mineral production index ( 4 ) 

Manufacturing index ( 4 ) 

Pig iron 000 tons 

Steel ingots and castings 000 tons 

Inspected slaughtering, cattle 000 

hogs 000 

Flour production 000,000 bbls 

Newsprint ( 3 ) 000 tons 

Cement producers' shipments 000,000 bbls 

Automobiles and trucks 000 

Gold 000 fine oz 

Copper 000 tons 

Lead 000 tons 

Nickel 000 tons 

Zinc 000 tons 

Coal 000 tons 

Crude petroleum 000,000 bbls 

Electric power 000,000 k.w.h 

Construction — 

Contracts awarded $000, 000 

Dwelling units started 000 

completed 000 

under construction 000 

Distribution- 
Wholesale sales index, unadjusted ( 4 ) 

' Retail trade $000, 000 

Imports, excluding gold $000,000 

Exports, excluding gold $000, 000 

Railways- 
Revenue freight, ton miles 000,000 

cars loaded 000 

Banking and Finance- 
Common stocks, index ( 4 ) 

Preferred stocks, index ( 4 ) 

Bond yields, Dominion, index ( 4 ) 

Cheques cashed, individual accounts $000,000 

Bank loans, current public $000, COO 

Money supply $000,000 

Circulating median in hands of public $000, 000 

Deposits $000, 000 



1952 



Nov. 



148- 

41- 



127-6 



167-3 
il7 : 8 



Oct. 



14,430 

5,419 
5,333 
4,166 
1,167 
3,947 
86 
192-0 
10,940 
3,273 



55.03 
129-9 
42-1 
1130 



142-8 
49-7 
22-8 

(?) 92-6 
844-2 

221-0 

185-0 
284-3 
116-0 



140-6 
583-0 
2-30 
502-8 



11-7 
1,781 



5,419 

191-1 

9-8 

9-5 

59-3 



377-7 
372-4 



391-7 

163-6 
161-2 
118-6 
11,279 
3,096 
5,143 
1,379 
3,764 



1951 



Oct. 



14,009 

5,343 

5,266 

4,136 

1,130 

3,798 

77 

186-5 

22,588 

11,433 

855 

51.59 

121-9 

41-9 

104-6 



131-0 
68-6 
18-3 

83-1 
751-5 

239-6 
190-4 
290-8 
117-1 

212-6 

172-5 

219-4 

224-5 

309-4 

116-2 

459-8 

1-93 

492-5 

1-65 

32-5 

380-8 

21-0 

15-1 

11-8 

300 

1,877 

4,882 

4,921 

139-1 

5-0 

8-2 

55-2 

383-7 
898-6 
344-1 
371-0 

5,744 
389-8 

183-3 
164-2 
105-7 
10,619 
2,893 
4,795 
1,256 
3,539 



1950 
Oct. 



13,921 

5,324 
5,221 
4,107 
1,114 
3,639 
103 
177-1 
5,771 
2,378 

736 

45.88 

105-3 

42-- 9 

102-3 



133-1 
64-8 
18-2 

79-3 
625-8 

220-0 
170-7 
260-4 
105-9 

210-7 

158-8 

221-7 

205-8 

293-9 

119-3 

397-8 

2-11 

456-4 

1-56 

35-6 

376-3 

22-2 

18-6 

10-4 

26-6 

1,816 

2,980 

4,395 

251-3 

9-8 

9-5 

70-0 

t 
830-4 
320-6 
315-2 

5.542 
385-3 

145-4 
161-1 
92-0 
9,391 
2.449 
4,925 
1,187 
3,738 



1944 
Oct. 



11,975 

t 
t 
t 
t 
t 
t 
t 
2,216 
257 

t 
t 
t 
t 
t 



62-4 
201-2 

t 

5-7 
235-7 

t 
118-6 

t 
t 

193-7 

98-7 

214-8 

154-1 

275-5 

132-8 

609-1 

2-05 

258-3 

0-88 

13-2 

230-7 

21-0 

9-2 

10-9 

21-5 

1,532 

878 

3,482 

25-9 



160-1 
314-0 

6,212 
331-0 

86-2 

126-7 

97-0 

4,932 

954 

(5)3,153 

972 

( 6 ) 2,163 



1939 



Oct. 



11,267 



( 6 ) 



318 



t 
t 
t 

t 
t 

t 
103-5 

t 
t 

117-8 
120-8 
117-7 

85-8 
149-9 

98-7 
425-9 

2-09 
281-0 

0-68 

11 
433 

25 

17 



3 

1 

5 

6 

9-4 

14-9 

1,799 

815 

2,590 

14-2 
t 
t 

t 

t 

t 

79-1 
90-4 

4,049 
270-3 



107-4 
111-9 
2,899 

952 
1,370 

281 
1,089 



Note— Latest figures subject to revision. Many of the statistical data in this table are included in the Canadian 
Statistical Review issued by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 

* Population figures given are as at June 1, for 1952, 1951; Sept. 1, for 1950; and June 1, for 1944, 1939. 

t Comparable statistics are not available. 

0) Labour Force Survey figures given are as at August 16, 1952, August 18, 1951 and August 19, 1950. Estimates 
are based on 1951 census. Detailed figures will be found in tables A 4— A 7 of the December issue of the Labour Gazette. 

( 2 ) Real earnings computed by dividing the Consumer Price Index into the average weekly earnings index base: 
average 1949 = 100. 

( 3 ) Newfoundland is included after April 1, 1949. 

( 4 ) Average 1935-39 = 100. 

( 5 ) Year end figures. 

(«) Figures for 1939-44 are production data rather than shipments. 

( 7 ) Effective August 1, 1952, claimants on temporaty mass lay-offs excluded from total of claimants. 



137 



A — Labour Force 



TABLE A-l.— DISTRIBUTION OF IMMIGRANTS AS ADULT MALES, ADULT FEMALES 

AND CHILDREN 

Source: Immigration Branch, Department of Citizenship and Immigration 



Date 



Adult 



Adult 
Females 



Children 
Under 18 



Total 



Annual Average, 1920-24 
Annual Average, 1925-29 
Annual Average, 1930-34 
Annual Average, 1935-39 
Annual Average, 1940-44 
Annual Average, 1945-49 

Total, 1950. 
Total, 1951 . 

1951— 

October 

November 

December 

1952— 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 



55,416 
74,447 
12,695 
3,564 
3,767 
26,701 

30,700 
95,818 



11,433 
11,725 
9,434 



6,453 
4,666 
8,751 
9,097 
8,819 
6,398 
6,124 
4,313 
3,190 
3,273 



34,803 
37,345 
12,145 
5,834 
6,674 
31,075 

24,172 
53,239 



6,161 
5,983 

5,787 



3,958 
3,306 
5,307 
5,554 
5,639 
5,028 
5,522 
3,935 
3,373 
4,462 



20,315 
30,517 
11,117 
5,054 
4,010 
18,064 

19,040 
45,334 



4,994 
4,534 
4,455 



2,720 
2,997 
4,585 
4,846 
5,390 
4,543 
5,041 
3,037 
2,704 
3,205 



110,534 
142,309 
35,957 
14,452 
14,451 
75,840 

73,912 
194,391 



22,588 
22,242 
19,676 



13,131 
10,969 
18,643 
19,497 
19,848 
15,969 
16,687 
11,285 
9,267 
10,940 



TABLE A-2.— DISTRIBUTION OF ALL IMMIGRANTS BY REGION 

Source: Immigration Branch, Department of Citizenship and Immigration 



Month 


Atlantic 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairies 


B.C. 

Yukon 
N.W.T. 


Total 


1946— Total 


8,656 
3,765 

4,558 
2,777 
2,198 
3,928 

348 

447 
381 

353 
259 
406 
526 
521 
564 
527 
280 
263 
272 


9,712 
8,272 
24,687 
18,005 
13,575 
46,033 

6,553 

5,885 
6,071 

3,660 
2,120 
4,209 
4,140 
4,044 
2,990 
3,029 
2,683 
1,999 
2,614 


29,604 
35,543 
61,621 
48,607 
39,041 
104,842 

11,438 
11,662 
9,697 

6,701 

6,110 

10,338 

10,584 

10,537 

8,202 

8,746 

5,298 

4,415 

5,459 


15,097 
7,909 
22,552 
17,904 
12.975 
25,165 

2,650 
2,355 
2,266 

1,334 
1,523 
2,257 
2,540 
3,019 
2,670 
2,689 
2,001 
1,609 
1,432 


8,650 
8,638 

11,996 
7,924 
6,123 

14,423 

1,599 

1,893 
1,261 

1,083 
957 
1,433 
1,707 
1,727 
1,543 
1,696 
1,023 
981 
1,163 


71,719 


1947— Total 


64,127 


1948— Total 


125,414 


1949— Total 


95,217 


1950— Total 


73,912 


1951— Total 


194,391 


1951 — 

October 


22,588 
22,242 




19,676 


952— 


13,131 




10,969 


March 


18,643 


April 

May 


19,497 
19,848 




15,969 


July 


16,687 




11,285 




9,267 


October 


10,940 



138 



TABLE A-3.— DISTRIBUTION OF WORKERS ENTERING CANADA BY OCCUPATIONS 

Source: Immigration Branch, Department of Citizenship and Immigration 



Month 


Farming 
Class 


Unskilled 
and Semi- 
skilled 


Skilled 
Workers 


Clerical 


Profes- 
sional 


Trading 


Female 

Do- 
mestics 


Others 


Total 
Workers 


1951 — 

October 

November 

December 

1952- 
January 


2,317 
2,019 
1,710 

1,164 

1,239 
2,240 
2,318 
2,611 
1,979 
2,131 
1,729 
592 
315 


3,977 
3,878 
3,922 

2,572 

1,540 

2,928 

2,904 

2,635 

1,602 

1,476 

761 

748 

870 


4,728 
5,209 
3,369 

2,135 

1.552 
3,120 
3,313 
2,789 
2,086 
1,871 
1,090 
1.021 
1.244 


569 
632 

478 

473 
390 
657 
768 
795 
707 
763 
459 
480 
617 


444 
424 
310 

501 
385 
527 
612 
660 
630 
656 
669 
686 
746 


274 
311 

217 

245 
192 
309 
352 
409 
347 
324 
247 
260 
302 


805 

748 

1,004 

732 
383 
606 
634 
577 
566 
751 
798 
470 
764 


545 
515 
613 

112 

96 

165 

228 

192 

126 

161 

78 

83 

116 


13,659 
13,736 
11,623 

7,934 


February 

March 


5,777 
10,552 
11,129 




10,668 




8,043 


July 


8,133 




5,831 


September 

October 


4,340 

4.974 



B — Labour Income 



TABLE B-l.— ESTIMATES OF LABOUR INCOME 

($ Millions) 
Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics 



— 


Agricul- 
ture, 
Forestry, 
Fishing, 
Trapping, 
Mining 


Manu- 
facturing 


Construc- 
tion 


Utilities, 
Transport- 
ation, 
Communi- 
cation, 
Storage 
Trade 


Finance, 
Services, 
(including 
Govern- 
ment) 


Supple- 
mentary 
Labour 
Income 


Total 


1938— Average 


21 
23 
26 
29 
30 
32 
33 
35 
41 
42 
49 
49 
59 

59 
59 
55 
55 
61 
67 
66 
68 
70 
74 
76 
73 

71 
74 
70 
60 
65 
65 
65 
72 
73 


59 
62 
78 
106 
142 
168 
171 
156 
147 
177 
203 
217 
241 

252 
254 
260 
266 
269 
276 
276 
279 
284 
283 
283 
268 

281 
287 
292 
294 
295 
294 
297 
307 
314 


9 

8 
11 
16 
18 
21 
17 
19 
25 
34 
41 
54 
58 

47 
46 
46 
53 
59 
64 
68 
71 
74 
73 
71 
55 

59 
59 

61 
66 
72 
79' 
87 
87 
87 


56 
58 
63 
73 
80 
86 
95 
100 
114 
134 
154 
173 
186 

187 
188 
191 
196 
202 
208 
209 
211 
214 
216 
219 
225 

212 
212 
214 
218 
222 
227 
229 
230 
232 


58 
59 
60 
66 
71 
78 
83 
90 
103 
114 
131 
149 
159 

160 
162 
168 
166 
174 
179 
178 
176 
178 
180 
179 
188 

181 
186 
187 
187 
193 
198 
197 
196 
196 


5 
5 

6 
8 

10 
14 
13 
13 
14 
17 
19 
22 
25 

25 
24 
25 
27 
27 
27 
30 
28 
28 
29 
29 
28 

29 
28 
28 
29 
29 
29 
30 
30 
30 


208 


1939— Average 


215 




244 




298 




353 




399 




412 




413 


1946 — Average 

1947 — Average 


444 
518 
597 


1949— September 

1950— September 

•1951— January 


664 

728 

730 
733 


March 


745 


April 


763 


May 


792 




821 


July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

•1952— January 


827 
833 
848 
855 
857 
837 

833 




846 




852 


April 

May 


854 
876 




892 


July 


905 




922 




932 







Includes Newfoundland. 



revised. 



139 



C — Employment, Hours and Earnings 

TABLE C-l.— EMPLOYMENT INDEX NUMBERS BY PROVINCES 

(Average calendar year 1939 = 100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 
Source: Employment and Payrolls, D.B.S. 
Tables C-l to C-3 are based on reports from employers having 15 or more employees— At October 1, employers 
In the principal non-agricultural industries reported a total employment of 2,503,233. 



Year and Month 


C 
c3 

Q 


ill 




I 8 


J4 
a 


o 

3 


$ 
a 
O 


'2 


c<3 
% 

u 
e3 

M 

CO 

03 
CO 


c3 
<P 

.a 
< 


c3 

*1 
'■J3 3 

'Co 

WO 


1947— A vet 
1948— A vei 
1949_Avei 




158-3 
165-0 
165-5 
168-0 
180-2 
175-3 
173-3 
175-6 
180-3 
183-6 
184-3 
185-4 
186-5 
186-4 
186-6 
181-0 
177-8 
178-0 
177-9 
177-4 
182-5 
185-5 
188-8 
190-6 
192-0 


146-5 
161-0 
157-0 
173-1 
176-8 
184-2 
152-0 
161-8 
178-1 
186-9 
188-7 
192-4 
188-6 
182-6 
181-0 
175-2 
183-4 
160-6 
213-4 
175-6 
191-7 
199-4 
207-9 
209-2 
205-4 


137-2 
148-4 
149-0 
142-5 
149-4 

149-1 
140-3 
140-3 
149-4 
149-6 
155-3 
157-8 
158-6 
158-4 
156-2 
149-2 
150-9 
146-7 
148-9 
146-2 
151-5 
160-6 
160-4 
163-8 
163-2 


172-7 
174-2 
165-6 
169-9 
180-5 
187-5 
177-1 
171-7 
171-6 
174-9 
179-9 
182-3 
183-6 
186-2 
192-3 
190-7 
186-3 
185-3 
192-4 
167-4 
174-6 
178-6 
172-3 
183-5 
185-4 


150-9 
156-2 
154-3 
155-0 
168-5 
162-3 
160-3 
163-3 
167-9 
171-0 
171-6 
173-2 
175-3 
178-0 
178-6 
171-7 
169-0 
169-6 
166-4 
164-2 
170-9 
177-3 
183-5 
179-3 
181-2 


163-9 
171-2 
173-1 
177-7 
191-0 
186-9 
187-3 
188-5 
191-9 
194-7 
193-5 
194-1 
195-4 
193-9 
194-7 
190-3 
187-6 
187-5 
187-6 
188-3 
191-6 
196-5 
195-9 
198-3 
200-3 


156-0 
162-0 
166-7 
168-0 
173-2 
171-2 
165-2 
167-5 
172-6 
177-6 
179-7 
180-4 
178-6 
178-4 
177-5 
173-0 
169-1 
167-8 
168-8 
170-9 
176-6 
179-2 
•182-7 
182-7 
182-7 


135-8 
139-0 
139-7 
140-8 
148-1 
144-4 
135-3 
137-9 
149-8 
154-6 
157-5 
157-8 
156-9 
157-7 
156-5 
152-1 
142-4 
141-7 
142-0 
147-3 
158-5 
162-3 
166-1 
164-2 
162-1 


158-9 
168-9 
180-3 
188-5 
202-6 
193-7 
187-0 
192-9 
202-5 
208-9 
218-0 
219-0 
214-0 
211-3 
210-9 
206-0 
201-7 
201-8 
201-6 
207-0 
214-1 
222-4 
231-5 
235-3 
230-8 


174-1 




181-6 




179-3 


1950—Avei 




180-7 


1951— Avei 




190-3 




, 1951 . . 


180-4 


Apr. 1 


1951 


181-0 


1951 


187-2 




1951 


192-3 


July 1 
Aug. 1 
Sept. 1 
Oct. 1 


, 1951 . . 


197-4 


1951 


198-1 


, 1951.. . 


198-9 


, 1951 


201-0 




, 1951 


197-9 


Dec. 1 


, 1951 


195-1 




, 1952 


186-4 


Feb. 1 


, 1952 


179-9 




, 1952 


183-9 




, 1952 


188-6 




, 1952 


192-7 




, 1952 


195-1 


July 1 


, 1952 


171-2 


Aug. 1 
Sept. 1 
Oct. 1 


, 1952 


183-9 
201-9 


, 1952 


204-7 








Percentage Distribution of Employees of Re- 
porting Establishments at October 1, 1952. 


100-0 


0-2 


3-7 


2-6 


29-3 


425 


5-2 


2-3 


4-9 


9-3 



Note:— The percentage distribution given above shows the proportion of employees in the indicated province, to the 
total number of employees reported in Canada by the firms making returns at the latest date. 

TABLE C-2.— EMPLOYMENT, PAYROLLS AND WEEKLY WAGES AND SALARIES 

(1939 = 100). (The latest figures are subject to revision) 
Source: Employment and Payrolls, D.B.S. 



Year and Month 



Industrial Composite 1 



Index Numbers 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
Weekly 
Payrolls 



Average 

Wages and 

Salaries 



Average 

Wages and 

Salaries 



Manufacturing 



Index Numbers 



Employ- 
ment 



Aggregate 
Weekly 
Payrolls 



Average 

Wages and 

Salaries 



Average 

Wages and 

Salaries 



1939— Average. 
1947 — Average. 
1948 — Average. 
1949 — Average. 
1950 — Average. 
1951 — Average. 



Jan. 

Apr. 

May 

June 

July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Fev. 

Mar. 

Apr. 

May 

June 

July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 



1951. 
1951. 
1951. 
1951. 
1951. 
1951. 
1951. 
1951. 
1951. 
1951. 

1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 



100-0 
158-3 
165-0 
165-5 
168-0 
180-2 

175-3 
173-3 
175-6 
180-3 
183-6 
184-3 
185-4 
186-5 
186-4 
186-6 

181-0 
177-8 
178-0 
177-9 
177-4 
182-5 
185-5 
188-8 
190-6 
192-0 



100-0 
245-2 
282-9 
303-7 
321-8 
381-3 

338-2 
357-8 
367-9 
379-0 
392-5 
394-0 
400-2 
4100 
413-4 
416-7 

388-8 
402-9 
409-0 
411-5 
410-6 
420-2 
426-3 
433-3 
442-7 
449-9 



100-0 
154-4 
170-9 
183-3 
191-3 
211-6 

193-1 

206-6 
209-8 
210-5 
214-0 
214-0 
216-1 
220-1 
222-1 
223-6 

215-1 
226-9 
230-2 
231-7 
231-8 
230-7 
230-2 
229-9 
232-7 
234-8 



$ 
23.44 
36.19 
40.06 
42.96 
44.84 
49.61 

45.27 
48.43 
49.17 
49.34 
50.17 
50.16 
50.66 
51.59 
52.05 
52.41 



1000 
171-0 
176-0 
175-9 
177-5 
190-0 

182-4 

188-8 
189-9 
192-0 
193-9 
194-0 
194-1 
194-2 
190-8 
189-1 

183-6 

185-2 
187-3 
188-3 
188-7 
190-9 
191-4 
194-1 
198-5 
200-2 



100-0 
272-7 
314-1 
339-2 
360-2 
427-6 

373-1 
414-6 
423-7 
429-0 
440-0 
440-1 
446-1 
454-4 
451-4 
451-8 

417-8 
449-9 
458-0 
467-2 
468-4 
470-1 
470-1 
474-6 
490-9 
501-4 



100-0 
159-5 
178-5 
192-9 
202-8 
224-9 

204-5 
219-5 
223-1 
223-3 
226-9 
226-8 
229-8 
233-9 
236-5 
238-9 

227-4 
242-9 
244-5 
248-1 
248-1 
246-2 
245-5 
244-4 
247-3 
250-3 



$ 

22.79 

36.34 

40.67 

43.97 

46.21 

51.25 

46.60 
50.03 
50.84 
50.90 
51.70 
51.68 
52.37 
53.31 
53.89 
54.44 

51.82 
55.36 
55.73 
56.55 
56.55 
56.10 
55.95 
55.71 
56.36 
57.05 



'Includes (1) Forestry (chiefly logging), (2) Mining (including milling), quarrying and oil wells, (3) Manufacturing, 
(4) Construction, (5) Transportation, storage and communication, (6) Public utility operation, (7) Trade, (8) Finance, 
insurance and real estate and (9) Service, (mainly hotels, restaurants, laundries, dry cleaning plants, business and 
recreational service). 

140 



TABLE C-3.— AEEA AND INDUSTRY SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT, PAYROLLS 
AND AVERAGE_WEEKLY WAGES AND SALARIES 

(1939 = 100) 

Source: Employment and Payrolls, D.B.S. 



Area and Industry 



(Index Numbers 1939 = 100) 



Employment 



Oct. 1 Sept. 1 
1952 1952 



Oct. 1 
1951 



Payrolls 



Oct. 1 
1952 



Sept. 1 
1952 



Oct. 1 
1951 



Average Weekly 
Wages and Salaries 



Oct. 1 
1952 



Sept. 1 
1952 



Oct. 1 

1951 



(a) Provinces 

Prince Edward Island 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British Columbia 

CANADA 

(b) Metropolitan Areas 

Sydney... , 

Halifax 

Saint John 

Quebec 

Sherbrooke 

Three Rivers 

Drummondville 

Montreal 

Ottawa— Hull 

Peterborough 

Oshawa : 

Niagara Falls 

St. Catharines 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

Brantford 

Gait 

Kitchener 

Sudbury 

London 

Sarnia 

Windsor 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Ft. William— Pt. Arthur 

Winnipeg 

Regina 

Saskatoon 

Edmonton 

Calgary 

Vancouver 

Victoria 

t (c) Industries 

Forestry (chiefly logging) 

Mining 

Manufacturing 

Durable Goods 1 

Non-Durable Goods 

Construction 

Transportation, storage, communi 

cation 

Public utility operation 

Trade 

Finance, insurance and real estate. . . 
Service 2 

Industrial composite 



205-4 
163-2 
185-4 
181-2 
200-3 
182-7 
162-1 
230-8 
204-7 

192 



114-4 
221-1 
173-7 
167-9 
173-3 
178-0 
176-1 
186-0 
191-6 
196-0 
282-7 
330-8 
251-1 
204-5 
207-0 
211-6 
160-8 
179-6 
183-6 
200-5 
341-5 
232-0 
251-8 
245-6 
179-1 
178-7 
206-5 
297-1 
234-2 
205-6 



183-1 
125-9 
200-2 
254-1 
165-5 
221-1 

190-5 
201-3 
181-5 
181-1 
192-7 

192-0 



209- 
163- 
183' 
179' 
198- 
182- 
164- 
235' 
201' 



190-6 



114-8 
219-8 
179-5 
157-6 
173-2 
176-7 
173-3 
184-0 
192-7 
196-6 
274-1 
318-2 
250-7 
202-0 
203-0 
212-7 
158-0 
176-1 
184-0 
199-6 
328-4 
232-8 
248-5 
236-4 
178-0 
176-8 
206-2 
301-1 
236-2 
205-8 
221-0 



151-1 
127-2 
198-5 
251-2 
164-5 
224-7 

192-5 
204-7 
177-5 
180-5 
197-8 

190-6 



188-6 
158-6 
183-6 
175-3 
195-4 
178-6 
156-9 
214-0 
201-0 

186 5 



109-7 
212-3 
173-3 
158-6 
171-6 
187-7 
208-5 
178-0 
192-4 
207-5 
255-9 
293-6 
245-9 
197-3 
206-9 
209-8 
151-9 
180-5 
177-4 
194-2 
288-9 
211-8 
228-3 
234-4 
173-9 
170-7 
195-8 
264-7 
223-2 
207-3 
229-8 



214-6 
120-1 
194-2 
240-2 
164-4 
206-1 

186-7 
191-8 
175-5 
173-3 
187-9 

186-5 



427-6 

351 

421 

445' 

468' 

372 

348 

508 

481 



449 9 



300-8 
420-8 
354-2 
412-9 
409-1 
451-6 
461-9 
433-9 
407-4 
543-0 
813-5 
866-4 
666-6 
468-1 
514-5 
570-2 
411-3 
457-1 
424-2 
450-9 
845-8 
532-7 
616-0 
554-0 
365-7 
386-6 
446-6 
690-9 
486-0 
469-4 
518-7 



591-6 
293-6 
501-4 
646-4 
397-2 
670-9 

381-2 
424-9 
386-5 
307-2 
399-6 

449-9 



431-3 
352-2 
409-8 
436-5 
459-2 
373-2 
351-9 
516-4 



442.7 



299-5 
415-8 
358-5 
375-6 
400-9 
455-4 
442-1 
424-4 
408-9 
537-3 
779-5 
842-5 
648-8 
456-1 
497-4 
570-6 
403-3 
442-9 
417-7 
443-2 
807-3 
537-6 
589-0 
528-0 
361-8 
386-8 
443-0 
698-6 
492-5 
463-4 
497-5 



491-4 
292-0 
490-9 
631-9 
389-7 
670-0 

384-7 
429-6 
378-6 
307-2 
401-3 



362-9 
323-1 
407-3 
406-5 
428-5 
348-5 
312-8 
446-2 
426-1 

410-0 



265-2 

376-5 
338-9 



361- 
385- 
477- 
531- 



442-7 



2 
1 
7 
7 

386-5 
390-7 
544-4 
678-3 
698-4 
627-4 
425-7 
477-0 
535-3 
359-4 
416-8 
375-3 
414-1 
614-8 
439-9 
511-9 
527-3 
335-2 
342-6 
385-6 
570-1 
426-8 
435-2 
473-4 



630-2 
263-0 
454-4 
567-5 
372-6 
570-8 

359-2 
375-8 
354-4 
280-9 
367-0 

410-0 



41.43 
46.21 
46.25 
52.29 
57.31 
52.39 
52.06 
56.07 
61.13 

55.03 



58.78 
44.56 
43.69 
45.81 
45.82 
50.75 
50.22 
53.34 
49.25 
58.46 
68.04 
63.16 
65.14 
57.83 
60.14 
55.95 
52.47 
53.96 
69.38 
53.23 
68.66 
63.99 
64.90 
57.47 
49.83 
48.98 
47.92 
54.67 
53.43 
57.25 
54.14 



55.92 
67.29 
57.05 
61.80 
52.35 
57.04 

57.24 
62.16 
46.53 
49.36 
34.66 

55.03 



41.04 
46.07 
45.44 
51.83 
56.74 
52.54 
51.91 
55.81 
60.50 

54.55 



58.33 
44.31 
42.79 
44.42 
44.93 
51.57 
48.84 
52.73 
49.15 
57.66 
67.24 
63.85 
63.49 
57.05 
59.26 
55.71 
52.37 
53.33 
68.18 
52.55 
68.15 
64.37 
62.88 
56.91 
49.59 
49.55 
47.60 
54.55 
53.67 
56.45 
53.97 



56.31 
66.22 
56.36 
61.11 
51.67 
56.05 

57.15 
61.80 
46.61 
49.51 
33.92 

54.55 



38.29 
43.67 
44.97 
49.33 
53.73 
50.17 
48.32 
52.77 
55.12 

51.59 



54.04 
41.54 
41.95 
42.41 
43.55 
50.93 
48.74 
49.60 
47.09 
55.27 
62.72 
57.30 
62.55 
54.21 
55.89 
53.03 
48.43 
49.06 
63.68 
50.53 
68.53 
57.91 
59.65 
57.19 
46.97 
45.46 
43.70 
50.63 
49.36 
52.59 
49.44 



50.83 
63.01 
53.31 
57.40 
49.42 
51.95 

55.06 
57.79 
44.17 
47.11 
32.07 

51.59 



1 Includes wood products, iron and steel products, transportation equipment, non-ferrous metal products, electrical 
apparatus and supplies and non-metallic mineral products. The non-durable group includes the remaining manufacturing 
industries. 

2 Mainly hotels, restaurants, laundries, dry cleaning plants and business and recreational services. 



141 



TABLE C-4.— HOURS AND EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING 

(Hourly-Rated Wage-Earners) Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings. D.B.S. 

Tables C-4 to C-6 are based on reports from a somewhat smaller number of firms than Tables C-l to C-3. 
They relate only to wage-earners for whom statistics of hours of work are also available, whereas Tables C-l 
to C-3 relate to salaried employees as well as to all wage-earners of the co-operative firms. 



Year and Month 



All Manufactures 



Average 
Hours 



Average 
Hourly 
Earnings 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 



Durable Goods 



Average 
Hours 



Average 
Hourly 
Earnings 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 



Non-Durable Goods 



Average 
Hours 



Average 
Hourly 
Earnings 



Average 
Weekly 
Wages 



1945 — Average. 
1946— Average. 
1947— Average. 
1948 — Average. 
1949 — Average. 
1950— Average. 
1951 — Average. 



Oct. 

Nov. 
Dec. 

♦Jan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Apr. 
May 
June 
July 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 



1951. 

, 1951. 

, 1951. 

, 1952. 

, 1952. 

, 1952. 

, 1952. 

, 1952. 

, 1952. 

, 1952. 

, 1952. 

, 1952. 

, 1952. 



No. 

44-3 
42-7 
42-5 
42-2 
42-3 
42-3 
41-8 
41-9 
41-8 



41-6 
41-7 
42-1 
41-9 
41-3 
41-3 
41-1 
41-6 
42-1 



cts. 



70 



91- 

98- 
103- 
116-8 
121-9 
123-5 
124-5 

127-1 
127-1 
127-8 
129-0 
129-4 
129-7 
128-6 
128-9 
129-5 
129-9 



30.74 
29.87 
34.13 
38.53 
41.71 
43-82 
48.82 
51.08 
51.62 
52.17 

48.43 
52.87 
53.29 
54.31 
54.22 
53.57 
53.11 
52.98 
53.87 
54.69 



No. 



44-7 
42-8 



cts. 

76-7 
76-4 
87-2 
98-4 
106-5 
112-0 
125-8 
132-1 
133-3 
134-6 



38-3 
41-9 
41-8 
42-3 
42-1 
41-4 
41-4 
41-1 
41-8 
42-2 



136' 
137< 
138 • 
139' 
139' 
139< 
138< 
139' 
141- 
141- 



34.28 
32.70 
37.23 
41.62 
45.26 
47.60 
52.84 
55.48 
56.12 
56.80 

52.24 
57.61 
57.85 
59.05 
58.73 
57.79 
57.26 
57.29 
59.02 
59.80 



No. 

43.7 
42-6 
42-3 
42-0 
42-0 
42-2 
41-7 
41-8 
41-5 
41.6 

37 9 
41-2 
41-5 
41-8 
41-6 
41-3 
41-2 
41-1 
41-4 
42-0 



cts. 

60-7 
63-8 
73-4 
84-0 
90-6 
95-2 
107-2 
111-2 
113-0 
113-5 

116-8 
115-7 
116-0 
116-9 
117-8 
118-4 
117-9 
117-5 
116-8 
117-1 



26.53 
27.18 
31.05 
35.28 
38.05 
40.17 
44.70 
46.48 
46.90 
47.22 

44.27 
47.67 
48.14 
48.86 
49.00 
48.90 
48.57 
48.29 
48.36 
49.18 



' The averages at these dates were affected by loss of working time at the year-end holidays in the case of January 



TABLE C-5.— HOURS AND EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING BY PROVINCES AND 

CITIES 

(Hourly- Rated Wage-Earners) Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, D.B.S. 





Average Hours Worked 


Average Hourly Earnings 
(in cents) 




Oct. 1, 

1952 


Sept. 1, 
1952 


Oct. 1, 
1951 


Oct. 1, 

1952 


Sept. 1, 
1952 


Oct. 1, 

1951 




44-7 
41-3 
43-2 
43-8 
41-6 
40-6 
41-0 
39-5 
33-7 

42-5 
41-3 
40-4 
39-1 
40-4 
38-3 


43-4 
42-4 
43-1 
43-2 
41-0 
41-0 
41-0 
40-6 
38-7 

42-0 
40-5 
40-0 
40-1 
40-4 
38-1 


44-2 
41-6 
44-6 
43-6 
41-5 
40-8 
40-9 
40-2 
37-6 

42-2 
41-0 
39-5 
38-2 
40-3 
37-3 


123-0 
113-6 
113-4 
116-1 
137-5 
124-6 
131-9 
132-0 
158-5 

121-9 
137-3 
151-7 
160-8 
122-8 
156-3 


121-2 
113-9 
111-1 
115-9 
137-0 
123-9 
131-5 
130-9 
157-3 

122-0 
136-3 
149-7 
160-5 
122-4 
156-2 


118-3 




104-9 




110-2 




109-6 




128-3 




118-6 




123-0 


Alberta 


122-1 




149-0 




114-1 




128-4 




142-6 




144-2 


Winnipeg 


117-2 




148-2 







142 



TABLE C-6.— HOURS AND EARNINGS BY INDUSTRY 

(Hourly-Rated Wage-Earners) 

Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, D.B.S. 

(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



Industry 



Mining 

Metal mining 

Gold 

Other metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables 

Grain mill products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled and malt liquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Rayon, nylon and silk textiles 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Men's clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

*Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries 

•Iron and steel products 

Agricultural implements 

Fabricated and structural steel 

Hardware and tools 

Heating and cooking appliances 

Iron castings 

Machinery mfg 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

•Transportation equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicles parts and accessories 

, Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

•Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

•Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery and equipment. . , 
•Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products 

Glass and glass products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations . 

Acids, alkalis and salts 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Durable goods 

Non-durable goods 

Construction 

Buildings and structures 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Sei vice 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laundries and dry cleaning plants 



Average Hours 



Oct. 1 Sept.l Oct. 1 
1952 1952 1951 



Average Hourly 
Earnings 



Oct. 1 Sept.] 
1952 1952 



cte. 
148 
160 

130 
162 
152 
150 

159 
136 

129 
107 
137 

80 
122 
99 
140 
128 
130 
92 
89 
104 
105 
98 
107 
92 
89 
97 
93 
117 
125 
105 
100 
141 
149 
114 
150 
146 
160 
156 
131 
127 
143 
136 
158 
140 
149 
148 
166 
152 
142 
142 
149 
138 
136 
163 
140 
164 
128 
121 
124 
173 
132 
107 
150 
103 
141 
116 
130 
143 
102 
131 
72 
71 
71 



Oct. 1 
1951 



Average Weekly 
Wages 



Oct. 1 Sept.! Oct. 1 
1952 1952 1951 



$ 
64 82 

67.35 
59.64 
71.92 
62.29 
60.26 
70.04 
59.74 
54.69 
45.62 
57.11 
38.45 
53.78 
44.19 
57.88 
52.08 
56.06 
38.48 
36.59 
44.79 
43.43 
43.96 
48.17 
36.82 
36.12 
36.44 
38.66 
50.94 
53.47 
47.06 
45.29 
64.04 
68.78 
49.64 
60.14 
62.01 
60.39 
67.72 
56.97 
56.16 
62.33 
58.55 
66.70 
60.59 
61.79 
68.11 
66.44 
63.46 
55.63 
59.14 
62.77 
60.82 
59.36 
67.45 
59.61 
69.26 
57.15 
54.31 
56.92 
72.67 
56.28 
45.07 
64.02 
43.24 
59.80 
49.18 
57.50 
62.14 
45.21 
59.88 
32.14 
32.50 
30.35 



$ 
63 49 

66.30 

59.38 

70.61 

60.31 

57.90 

68.87 

58.69 

53.87 

45 

55.96 

33.95 

54.55 

44.98 

59.66 

51.95 

54.45 

37.88 

36.22 

43.01 

40.38 

42.88 

47.15 

35.64 

34.55 

35.78 

37.09 

50.57 

53.55 

45 

44.30 

63.38 

68.35 

48.29 

59.56 

61.15 

63.28 

65.81 

54.63 

54.06 

60.49 

57.16 

66.29 

59.01 

61.93 

66.47 

69.39 

59.74 

56.84 

58.93 

61.70 

59.56 

57.53 

66.75 

57.28 

67.49 

56.71 

54.16 

55.62 

7. 52 

5 .78 

44.22 

61.95 

42.21 

59.02 

48.36 

55.86 

60.31 

44.53 

60.40 

31.19 

31.34 

29.58 



S 
60 67 

62.41 
58.20 
65.50 
59.19 
57.06 
67.23 
57.22 
51.08 
42.87 
53.57 
37.26 
53.01 
41.74 
50.80 
42.35 
52.79 
33.60 
31.75 
40.50 
38.33 
40.50 
44.54 
33.49 
30.78 
33.54 
36.17 
46.78 
49.37 
42.87 
41.19 
64.62 
71.25 
45.17 
54.89 
57.81 
59.56 
61.44 
52.63 
49.24 
58.59 
57.02 
61.28 
54.68 
58.17 
63.75 
59.46 
59.86 
56.24 
54.74 
57.40 
51.79 
54.52 
63.51 
54.67 
62.57 
54.43 
51.51 
52.06 
68.46 
52.78 
41.05 
61.01 
41.23 
55.48 
46.48 
51.90 
55.66 
42.29 
54.94 
30.18 
30.62 
28.13 



Durable manufactured goods industries. 



143 



TABLE C-7 -EARNINGS, HOURS AND REAL EARNINGS FOR WAGE EARNERS IN 
TABLE C 7. ^"^^NIJFACTIJRING INDUST ri E S IN CANADA 

Soxjbcb: Hours Worked and Hourly and Weekly Wages, D.B.S. Real Wages computed by the 
Economics and Research Branch, Department of Labour 



Date 



Monthly 
Monthly 
Monthly 
Monthly 
Monthly 
Monthly 
Monthly 



Average 1945. 
Average 1946. 
Average 1947. 
Average 1948. 
Average 1949. 
Average 1950. 
Average 1951. 



Week Preceding: 

October 1, 1951. 
November 1, 1951. 
December 1, 1951. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 



September, 1, 



1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 
1952. 



October 1, 1952 (i). 



Average 
Hours 

Worked 
per 
Week 



44-3 
42-7 
42-5 
42-2 
42-3 
42-5 
42-1 



41-9 
41-8 
41-9 

41-7 ! 
41-6 
41-7 
42-1 
41-7 
41-3 
41-3 
41-1 
41-6 
42-1 



Average 
Hourly 

Earnings 



69-4 
70-0 



91-3 



103-6 
116-8 



121-9 
123-5 
124-5 

127-1 
127-1 
127-8 
129-0 
129-4 
129-7 
128 6 
128-9 
129-5 
129-9 



Average 
Weekly 
Earnings 

(W.E.) 



Index Numbers (Av. 1949 = 100) 



30.71 
29.87 
34.13 
38.53 
41.71 
44.03 
49.15 



51.08 
51.62 
52.17 

53.01' 
52.87 
53.29 
54.31 
53.96 
53.57 
53.11 
52.98 
53.87 
54.69 



Average 
Weekly 
Earnings 



Consumer 
Price 
Index 



73-6 
71-6 
81-8 
92-4 
100-0 
105-6 
117-8 



122-5 
123-8 
125-1 

127-1 
126-8 
127-8 
130-2 
129-4 
128-4 
127-3 
127-0 
129-2 
131-1 



75-0 
77-5 
84-8 
97-0 
100-0 
102-9 
113-7 



117-1 
117-9 
118-1 

118-2 
117-6 
116-9 
116-8 
115-9 
116-0 
116-1 
116-0 
116-1 
116-0 



Average 

Real 
Weekly 

Earnings 



98*1 
92-4 
96-5 
95-3 
100-0 
102-6 
103-6 



104-6 
105-0 
105-9 

107-5 
107-8 
109-3 



111' 

111- 
110' 
109 
109 
111 
113 



Note: Average Real Weekly Earnings were computed by dividing the Consumer Price index into the average weekly 
earnings index. (Avergae 1949 = 100). »«.„- «is At 

* Figures adjusted for holidays. The actual figures are: January 1, 1952, 38-1 hours, $48.43. 
(0 Latest figures subject to revision. 



144 



D — National Employment Service Statistics 



Tables D-l to D-7 are based on regular 
statistical reports from local offices of the 
National Employment Service. These 
statistics are compiled from two different 
reporting forms, UIC 751: statistical report 
on employment operations by industry, and 
UIC 757: inventory of registrations and 
vacancies by occupation. The data on 
applicants and vacancies in these two 
reporting forms are not identical. 

Form UIC 751 : This form provides a 
cumulative total for each month of # all 
vacancies notified by employers, applications 
made by workers, and referrals and place- 
ments made by the National Employment 
Service. Also reported are the number of 
vacancies unfilled and applications on file 
at the beginning and end of each reporting 
period. Because the purpose of these data 
is to give an indication of the volume of 
work performed in various local National 
Employment Service offices, all vacancies and 
applications are counted, even if the 
vacancy is not to be filled until some future 
date (deferred vacancy) or the application 
is from a person who already has a job 
and wants to find a more suitable one. 

Form UIC 757: This form provides >a 
count of the number of jobs available and 
applications on file at the end of business 
on a specified day. Excluded from the data 



on unfilled vacancies are orders from 
employers not to be filled until some future 
date. The data on job applications from 
workers exclude those people known to be 
already employed, those known to be regis- 
tered at more than one local office (the 
registration is counted by the "home" office), 
and registrations from workers who will not 
be available until some specified future date. 
Claimants for unemployment insurance 
benefits who are subject to a temporary mass 
lay-off are not registered for employment, 
and thus are not included in the statistics 
reported on form UIC 751 nor in the main 
figures in form UIC 757. A temporary mass 
lay-off is defined as a lay-off either for a 
determinate or indeterminate period which 
affects 50 or more workers and where the 
workers affected, so far as is known, will be 
returning to work with the same employer. 
Commencing 15 days after the date of such 
a lay-off, claimants still on the live insur- 
ance register are registered for employment 
on their next visit to the office and hence- 
forth are counted in both statistical report- 
ing forms. Persons losing several days' 
work each week and consequently claiming 
short-time unemployment insurance benefits 
are not included in either statistical report- 
ing forms unless they specifically ask to be 
registered for employment. 



TABLE D-l.— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND LIVE APPLICATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT 

(Source: Form UIC 757) 



J 


kfonth 


Unfilled Vacancies* 


Live Applications for Employment 




Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Date nearest: 


1946 


69,390 
35,947 
16,179 
10,400 

32,081 

29,933 

21,192 
14,957 
15,129 
18,252 
25,778 
26,915 
22,772 
23,413 
26,178 
29,058 
23,846 
19,544 


38,707 
22,325 
15,993 
12,085 

11,039 

9,094 

8,218 
8,736 
10,209 
13,100 
16,332 
18,253 
17,679 
17,212 
20,870 
20,685 
18,092 
15,738 


108,097 
58,272 
32,172 

22,485 

43,120 

39,027 

29,410 
23,693 
25,338 
31,352 
42,110 
45,168 
40,451 
40,625 
47,048 
49,743 
41,938 
35,282 


110,465 
82,990 
102,638 
164,345 

124,850 

138,946 

216,839 
275,814 
285,454 
304,941 
241,885 
163,530 
134,394 
118,318 
105,169 
93,699 
99,383 
142,708 


29,003 
33,584 
37,641 
56,439 

61,456 

69,071 

73,400 
87,011 
85,487 
80,067 
68,351 
61,295 
61,866 
57,396 
51,121 
49,140 
49,258 
51,805 


139,468 




1947 


116,574 


December 1 , 


1948 


140,279 




1949 


220,784 




1950 


186.306 




1951 


208,017 


January 1 , 


1952 


290,239 




1952 


362,825 


March 1 , 


1952 


370,941 


April 1, 


1952 


385,008 


May 1, 


1952 


310,236 


June 1 , 


1952... 


224,825 


July 1, 


1952 


196,260 


August 1 , 


1952 


175,714 


September 1 , 


1952 


156,290 


October 1 , 


1952 


142,839 


November 1, 


1952 (i) 


148,641 


December 1 , 


1952 (i) 


194,513 









(*) Current vacancies only. Deferred vacancies are excluded. 
C 1 ) Latest figures subject to revision. 



67040—10 



145 



TABLE D-2.-UNFILLED VACANCIES BY INDUSTRY AND BY SEX AS AT 

OCTOBER 31, 19520) 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 751) 





Male 


Female 


Total 


Change From 


Industry 


September 
30, 1952 


November 
1, 1951 




630 

5,594 

5,331 

206 

57 

594 

221 

92 
86 
28 
71 
96 

5,340 

640 

478 

483 

263 

159 

25 

36 

156 

103 

582 

171 

598 

350 

1,296 

3,575 

778 

467 

2,683 

831 

1,852 

736 

3,235 

1,211 

117 

1,125 

782 


206 

12 

5 

7 


836 

5,606 

5,336 
213 
57 

618 

223 

98 

88 
28 
77 
104 

9,773 

1,055 

3,131 

570 

482 

261 

38 

59 

428 

147 

639 

269 

652 

534 

1,508 

3,641 

903 

672 

6,496 

1,316 
5,180 

1,391 

11,402 

1,632 
3,683 
4,895 
1,192 


+ 
+ 

+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 

+ 
+ 


1,327 

1,736 

1,909 
173 


515 

33 

68 
80 
168 
146 
20 

2,224 

191 

1,161 

278 

262 

74 

5 

9 

92 

92 

85 

196 

123 

31 

57 

3,252 

525 

256 

505 

365 
140 

207 

1,904 

97 

437 

1,219 

345 


+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 

+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 

+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 

+ 

+ 

+ 
+ 

+ 


289 


Logging 


19,369 




16,459 




2,854 




56 


Mining 


24 

2 

6 
2 


864 


Coal 


336 


Metallic ores — 


26 


Gold 


330 




136 


Other metallic ores and non-metallic minerals 


6 

8 

4,433 

415 

2,653 

87 

219 

102 

13 

23 

272 

44 

57 

98 

54 

184 

212 

66 

125 

205 

3,813 

485 
3,328 

655 

8,167 

421 
3,566 
3,770 

410 


50 

14 




2,318 




224 




2,100 




476 




135 




31 




21 




21 




270 




43 




445 




55 




9 




287 


Transportation equipment and other manufacturing 

Construction 


423 
765 


Transportation and storage 


476 


Communications, and other public utilities 


238 




2470 




368 




2,102 




111 


Service 


2,276 


Public 


59 




804 




1,295 




236 






All Industries 


23,632 


17,706 


41,338 


- 


8,467 


- 


14,350 







(!) Preliminary — subject to revision. 

( 2 ) Current Vacancies only. Deferred Vacancies are excluded. 



146 



TABLE D-3.— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND LIVE APPLICATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT, 
BY OCCUPATION AND BY SEX AS AT OCTOBER 30, 19520) 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 757) 



Occupational Group 



Professional and managerial workers. . 

Clerical workers 

Sales workers 

Personal and domestic service workers 

Seamen 

Agriculture and fishing 

Skilled and semiskilled workers 

Food and kindred products 

(inc. tobacco) 

Textiles, clothing, etc 

Lumber and wood products 

Pulp, paper (inc. printing) 

Leather and leather products 

Stone, clay and glass products 

Metal working 

Electrical 

Transportation equipment 

Mining 

Construction 

Transportation (ex cept seamen ). . . 
Communication and public utility. 

Trade and service 

Other skilled and semiskilled 

Foremen 

Apprentices 

Unskilled workers 

Food and tobacco 

Lumber and lumber products 

Metalworking 

Construction 

Other unskilled workers 

Total 



Unfilled Vacancies ( 2 ) 



Male 



1,546 

2,043 

1,592 

933 

45 

787 

13,167 

119 

244 

5,486 

47 

110 

19 

1,688 

238 

53 

259 

1,962 

1,036 

65 

209 

1,407 

58 

167 

3,733 

295 

251 

115 

1,015 

2,057 



23,846 



Female 



749 

3,637 

2,272 

6,652 

1 

51 

3,043 

107 

2,272 

3 

18 

182 

1 

36 

66 



20 



173 

112 

5 



1,687 

322 

25 



1,296 



18,092 



Total 



2,295 

5,680 

3,864 

7,585 

46 

838 

16,210 

226 

2,516 

5,489 

65 

292 

20 

1,724 

304 

53 

259 

1,962 

1,056 

65 

382 

1,519 

63 

215 

5,420 

617 

276 

159 

1,015 

3,353 



41,938 



Live Applications for Employment 



Male 



2,843 

5,456 

2,644 

11,682 

980 

883 

35,444 

573 

1,376 

3,469 

623 

533 

149 

4,673 

572 

389 

429 

8,522 

5,460 

197 

1,041 

5,132 

974 

1,332 

39,451 

909 

1,928 

1,981 

5,683 

28,950 



99, 



Female 



1,035 

13,860 

6,328 

9,422 

9 

174 

9,237 

491 

5,073 

47 

350 

606 

25 

404 

294 

116 

1 

1 

32 

3 

805 

809 

141 

39 

9, 193 



166 
314 



6,795 



49,258 



Total 



3,878 
19,316 

8,972 

21,104 

989 

1,057 

44,681 

1,064 

6,449 

3,516 

973 

1,139 

174 

5,077 

866 

505 

430 

8,523 

5,492 

200 

1,846 

5,941 

1,115 

1,371 



2,827 
2,094 
2,295 
5.683 
35,745 



148,641 



0) Preliminary — subject to revision. 

( 2 ) Current vacancies only. Deferred vacancies are excluded. 



67040— 10i 



147 









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TABLE D-5.— APPLICATIONS RECEIVED AND PLACEMENTS EFFECTED BY 

EMPLOYMENT OFFICES 

(Source: Form U.I.C. 751) 

(1942—1952) 



Year 


Applications 


Placements 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


1942 


1,044,610 
1,681,411 
1,583,010 
1,855,036 
1,464,533 
1,189,646 
1,197,295 
1,295,690 
1,500,763 
1,541,208 
1,395,514 


499,519 
1,008,211 
902,273 
661,948 
494,164 
439,577 
459,332 
494,956 
575,813 
623,467 
544,579 


1,544,129 
2,689,622 
2,485,283 
2,516,984 
1,958,697 
1,629,223 
1,656,627 
1,790,646 
2,076,576 
2,164,675 
1,940,093 


597,161 

1,239,900 

1,101,854 

1,095,641 

624,052 

549,376 

497,916 

464,363 

559,882 

655,933 

584,033 


298,460 
704,126 
638,063 
397,940 
235,360 
220,473 
214,424 
219,816 
230,920 
262,305 
252, 678 


895,621 


1943... 


1,944,026 


1944 


1,739,917 


1945 


1,493,581 


1946 


859,412 


1947 


769,849 


1948 


712,340 


1949 


684,179 


1950 


790,802 


1951 


918,238 


1952 (44 wks) 


836,711 







153 



E — Unemployment Insurance 



TABLE E-l.— PERSONS RECEIVING BENEFIT, NUMBER OF DAYS BENEFIT PAID, 

AND AMOUNT PAID 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 





Number 
Receiving 
Benefit 
in Last 
Week of the 
Month* 


Month of October, 


1952 


Province 


Number 

Com- 
mencing 
Benefit 


Number 

of Days 

Benefit 

Paid 


Amount of 

Benefit 

Paid 




909 

322 

5,100 

3,853 

25,533 

25,365 

3,711 

924 

1,886 

11,803 


594 

172 

3,890 

2,366 

16,578 

15,907 

1,897 

464 

1,338 

7,642 


23,388 
8,622 

107,006 
90,531 

624,293 

636,800 
87,874 
23,804 
51,755 

278,921 


74,340 




22,589 




324,273 




276,463 




1,763,219 




1,904,843 




248,656 




66,480 




155,956 




873,921 






Total, Canada, October, 1952 


79,406 


50,848 


1,932,994 


5,710,740 






Total, Canada, September, 1952 


74,309 


43,167 


1,933,547 


5,710,886 






Total, Canada, October, 1951 


72,267 


46,102 


1,567,172 


3,901,854 







Week containing last day of the month 



TABLE E-2.— PERSONS ON THE LIVE UNEMPLOYMENT REGISTER, BY NUMBER OF 
DAYS CONTINUOUSLY ON THE REGISTER, AS OF OCTOBER, 1952 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



Province and Sex 


Total 


6 days 
and 
under 


7-12 
days 


13-24 
days 


25-48 
days 


49-72 
days 


73 days 
and 
over 




1,880 

1,737 

143 

481 
336 
145 

8,583 
7,482 
1,101 

6,642 
5,386 
1,256 

40,352 
26,758 
13,594 

42,528 
30, 665 
11,863 

5,197 
3,224 
1,973 

1,398 
849 
549 

4,068 

3,094 

974 

16,734 
12,341 
4,393 


576 
545 
31 

132 
98 
34 

2,530 

2,292 

238 

1,980 

1,623 

357 

12,248 
8,709 
3,539 

17,158 
14,003 
3,155 

1,641 

1,077 

564 

399 

283 
116 

2,071 

1,757 

314 

5,056 
3,958 
1,098 


131 
123 

8 

41 
33 

8 

1,412 
1,314 

98 

708 
567 
141 

4,728 
3,282 
1,446 

3,949 
2,908 
1,041 

511 
341 
170 

129 
75 
54 

250 
152 

98 

1,645 

1,187 

458 


252 

238 

14 

75 
51 
24 

1,436 

1,247 

189 

1,082 
898 
184 

5,768 
3,913 
1,855 

5,514 
3,757 
1,757 

626 
350 
276 

191 
104 

87 

355 

227 
128 

2,541 

1,879 
662 


399 

372 
27 

88 
63 
25 

1,443 

1,214 

229 

1,213 

1,019 

194 

6,612 
4,394 
2,218 

4,973 
3,118 
1,855 

725 
398 
327 

210 
101 
109 

458 
273 
185 

2,915 

2,119 

796 


260 

240 

20 

47 
31 
16 

662 
550 
112 

648 
540 
108 

3,635 
2,293 
1,342 

2,865 
1,607 
1,258 

436 
253 
183 

109 
57 
52 

242 
156 

86 

1,587 

1,114 

473 


262 




219 




43 




98 




60 




38 




1,100 




865 




235 




1,011 




739 




272 




7,361 




4,167 




3,194 




8,069 


Male 


5,272 




2,797 




1,258 


Male 


805 




453 




360 




229 




131 




692 


Male 


529 




163 




2,990 


Male 


2,084 




906 






Total 


127,863 
91,872 
35,991 


43,791 

34,345 

9,446 


13,504 
9,982 
3,522 


17,840 
12,664 
5,176 


19,036 
13,071 
5,965 


10,491 

6,841 
3,650 


23,201 




14,969 




8,232 







154 



TABLE E-3.— INITIAL AND RENEWAL CLAIMS FOR BENEFIT BY PROVINCES, 

OCTOBER, 1952 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 





Claims filed at Local Offices 


Disposal of Claims (including; claims 
pending from previous months) 


Province 


Total 


Initial 


Renewal 


Total 

Disposed 

of 


Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Not 
Entitled 
to Benefit 


Pending 




1,219 
268 

5,995 

3,892 
26,569 
32,512 

3,422 
900 

2,144 
11,063 


980 
197 
3,727 
2,303 
15,870 
17,552 
2,129 
631 
1,603 
6,341 


239 
71 

2,268 

1,589 

10,699 

14,960 

1,293 

269 

541 

4,695 


1,083 
246 

6,288 

3,509 
25,283 
30,203 

3,177 
799 

1,996 
10,834 


682 

173 

5,362 

2,783 

19,373 

24,706 

2,318 

501 

1,397 

8,024 


401 

73 

926 

726 

5,910 

5,407 

859 

298 

599 

2,810 


406 




77 




1,375 




1,115 




6,928 




6,156 




535 




202 




426 




2,574 






Total Canada, October, 1952 


87,957* 


51,333 


36,624 


83,418t 


65,409 


18,009 


19,794 


Total Canada, September, 1952 


64,703 
82,902 


36,720 


27,983 


63,062 


48,920 


14,142 


15,255 


Total Canada, October, 1951 


53,104 


29,798 


77,358 


61,172 


16,186 


21,090 







* In addition, revised claims received numbered 11,774. t In addition, 11,957 revised claims were disposed of 
Of these. 855 were special requests not granted, and 1,308 were appeals by claimants. There were 1,601 revised claims 
pending at the end of the month. 

TABLE E-L— REGULAR AND SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFIT CLAIMS DISALLOWED 
AND CLAIMANTS DISQUALIFIED 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



Chief Reasons for Non-Entitlement 


Month of 

October, 

1952 


Month of 

September, 

1952 


Month of 

October, 

1951 




7,725 


5,527 


6,653 


Claimants Disqualified* — 






2,714 
1,262 
1,452 
1,729 
1,124 
1,329 
633 
4,913 
1,116 
1,135 


2,048 

923 

1,125 

1,761 

903 

1,356 

551 

4,476 

1,021 

1,108 


3,499 












1,044 




375 


Refused offer of work and neglected opportunity to work 


859 


Discharged for misconduct 


561 


Voluntarily left employment without just cause 

Failure to fulfill additional conditions imposed upon certain married women . . 


3,880 
1,046 
1,218 






Total 


22,418 


18,751 


19,135 







* Includes 4,409 revised claims, disqualified. 

t These include: Claims not made in prescribed manner; failure to carry out written directions; claimants being 
inmates of prisons, etc. 



TABLE E-5.— ESTIMATES OF THE INSURED POPULATION UNDER THE 
UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



At Beginning of Month of 


Total 


Employed 


Claimants* 


1951— September 


3,071,000 
3,094,000 
3,106,000 
3,170,000 

3,183,000 
3,195,000 
3,191,000 
3,195,000 
3,086,000 
3,089,000 
3,108,000 
3,147,000 
3,169,000 


2,990,100 
3,010,900 
3,006,200 
3,016,300 

2,935,900 
2,876,500 
2,874,600 
2,874,700 
2,867,900 
2,945,500 
2,985,300 
3,034,400 
3,067,000 


80 900 


October 


83,100 


November 


99,800 


December 


153,700 


1952 — January 


247, 100t 




318,5001 


March 


316,400f 


April 


320, 300 t 


May 


218,100 


June 


143,500 


July 


122,700 


August 


112,600 


September 


102,000 







* Ordinary claimants on the live unemployment register on the last working day of the preceding month, 
t Includes supplementary benefit claimants. 



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